Tag Archives: Studio Showcase

Studio Spotlight: Noise Nest Invests in the Future

Noise NestHollywood, CA (January 20, 2021)—Nick Gross, drummer, producer and entrepreneur, is a busy man, recording and performing with a variety of bands while also overseeing Gross Labs, his growing entertainment, media and investment company. Amidst all that action, Gross found the time over the past year to expand his Noise Nest production complex in Hollywood.

Now spanning an entire block in the heart of Hollywood’s media district, Noise Nest began more modestly under another name about eight years ago. “We leased the smaller space for the first three years for a production team that I had at the time; we used it as a songwriting facility,” says Gross. “We later built it out to be more of a recording studio facility where other managers, publishers and labels could use the space.”

When his neighbor’s larger building became available, Gross snapped it up, gutting the structure and calling in Peter Grueneisen’s nonzero\architecture to design a three-room complex with lounges, kitchen and other amenities. He then had designer and acoustician Chris Owens of F.C. Owens revamp the two production rooms in the original, smaller building.

Noise Nest's Studio A is centered around a split API 1608 console and a Slate Raven system.
Noise Nest’s Studio A is centered around a split API 1608 console and a Slate Raven system.

“It started as this sort of punk-rock, grungy little studio and it’s turned into a multi-purpose, multi-use content factory,” Gross says. His vision for Noise Nest was inspired by pro skateboarder Rob Dyrdek’s now-defunct Fantasy Factory in downtown L.A., which he calls “a cool and creative way to think outside of the box.”

The initial two rooms catered to outside clients while Gross was growing his business, but Noise Nest now focuses on in-house content creation. “I host a lot of our internal publishing and label clients; they each get to use the space for free,” he says. “We’re doing all kinds of things: music production, live streaming, gaming. It’s an epic live event space; we built two basketball courts.”

The Gross Labs umbrella company, launched in 2018, encompasses record label and music publisher Big Noise Music Group, Noise Nest Animation, e-sports organization Team Rogue, and philanthropic education and self-discovery platform Find Your Grind. Gross co-founded Big Noise with Vagrant Records co-founders Jon Cohen and John “Feldy” Feldmann, the man behind SoCal ska-punk band Goldfinger; signings include The Used, Ashley Tisdale and The Wrecks. Gross still sometimes plays with Goldfinger, as well as his own bands, Half the Animal and girlfriends. His many investments range from consumer products to new tech ventures.

Studio B sports an SSL Nucleus.
Studio B sports an SSL Nucleus.

A common thread throughout Noise Nest is PMC speakers. “The choice of PMC was a no-brainer,” says Gross, who first heard the monitors at the studios of his friend, producer and songwriter Dr. Luke. “They’re incredible. We’re super stoked to have them.” Studio A features PMC’s flagship QB1-A in-wall main monitors, while various IB1S-A, twotwo.6 and twotwo.8 models provide near field coverage there and in the other rooms.

There is a consistent aesthetic between rooms. The largest space, A, is dominated by a massive console supporting a split analog API 1608, with the main desk to the left and 16 more channels to the right, plus a Slate Raven system. “It’s a one-of-a-kind desk that I wanted to build out with a cool mixture of analog and digital. The outboard gear that sits behind it is pretty special as well,” he says, and includes SSL and Neve mic preamps.

The live room in Studio A has ample space for artists.
The live room in Studio A has ample space for artists.

The tracking space is just the right size, he says: “It gets the job done. We wanted to be smart with the space and be as effective as we could, knowing that we wanted to build three studios in a 4,500-square-foot building,” he says.

Studio Showcase: Asheville’s Vinyl Answer

The B room, equipped with an SSL Matrix2 and soffited Genelec 1238A SAM main monitors, transforms into an indoor/outdoor space. “People can be playing basketball outside and see what’s going on inside the room at the same time,” he says. The console in Studio C, the smallest room, overlooks a small booth and houses an industry-standard vocal chain—Neve 1073 preamp and Tube-Tech CL 1B compressor—with ATC SCM25A Pro monitors and a rack of additional outboard gear.

Studio C adjoins a small vocal booth
Studio C adjoins a small vocal booth

“All three studios have their own vibe. I wanted to take the feeling of old recording studios, whether that was old brick or old wood or analog gear, and give it that high-end, digital, 2020s modern vibe. So we have white brick everywhere and polished concrete for all the floors,” says Gross. “It’s just a fun hang and a good vibe. You don’t want to leave.”

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Studio Showcase: Asheville’s Vinyl Answer

Musician, composer, producer and label owner Gar Ragland founded Citizen Vinyl, which includes a recording studio centered around a Rupert Neve Designs 5088 console.
Musician, composer, producer and label owner Gar Ragland founded Citizen Vinyl, which includes a recording studio centered around a Rupert Neve Designs 5088 console. David J. Simchock

Asheville, NC (November 30, 2020)—Vinyl record sales have been steadily rising over recent years, a fact that did not go unnoticed by 30-year music industry veteran Gar Ragland. Following a visit to musician Jack White’s pressing plant in Detroit several years ago, he decided to open his own vinyl facility in the mountains of North Carolina.

The Citizen Vinyl facility includes a recording studio, record pressing plant, café/bar, record store/art gallery and performance space.
The Citizen Vinyl facility includes a recording studio, record pressing plant, café/bar, record store/art gallery and performance space. Stephan Pruitt Photography

“It was seeing what Third Man Pressing are doing that really helped affirm my gut instinct that a similar concept would do well in Asheville,” says Ragland. “Not only because of our homegrown love of music and history of craft here in North Carolina, but also because we have 12 million tourists coming through town, many of whom are seeking a cultural adventure.”

Ragland’s Citizen Vinyl plant, on the first floor of the historic three-story Asheville Citizen-Times newspaper building, has plenty to appeal to tourists. The pressing plant, operated under the guidance of German native Peter Schaper, is behind glass and open to view. Ragland’s business concept has evolved to include a collective of local craftspeople.

“Under one business entity, we have vinyl pressing along with a vinyl record-themed cocktail bar, a farm-to-table café, and a store, Coda, that features new vinyl records and an art gallery featuring local visual artists. We call it analog sound and art,” he says. Staff curate Daily Sides, an in-store vinyl playlist that’s posted on Instagram and soon will be streamed on Citizen Vinyl’s website.

The newspaper built broadcast studios for its WWNC-AM radio station on the third floor in 1939, introducing a national listening audience to bluegrass music. “Hundreds of acts would play in Studio A, including Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass Boys,” says Ragland.

Having rented a room for years at the nearby Echo Mountain Recording facility, Ragland, a musician, composer, producer and owner of the New-Song Music label, saw an opportunity to open his own studio. The building’s owner was days from turning WWNC’s studios into office space when Ragland took a tour: “I pleaded with him to put the sledgehammers down and give us some time to figure out how we could save this piece of Asheville and American roots music history.”

The new recording facility, created out of the former broadcast studios of WWNC-AM, has an emphatically analog mindset.
The new recording facility, created out of the former broadcast studios of WWNC-AM, has an emphatically analog mindset. Stephan Pruitt Photography

The Citizen Studios are in WWNC’s former Studio A, with 32 tielines to the high-ceilinged Studio B, now a multipurpose live and event space. “We’ve tracked a few projects in there and are still figuring out what the room’s strengths and weaknesses are,” he says.

“We hired David Rochester of Technical Audio Services to work on our restoration and treatment. He’s also a dealer for Rupert Neve Designs, so I worked with him to get a 5088 console in here and he helped with the wiring and installation. He’s been a great member of the Citizen Vinyl team.”

Ragland, a Rupert Neve fan, says, “What I love about this console is that it’s a new, warrantied piece of equipment, but it has all the mojo and vibe of the classic Neve sound. It’s got a lot of depth and breadth and horsepower, but it’s also simple and elegant in its design, which I find empowering.”

He has since added some Shelford modules in the desk’s penthouse. “Those sound so good—the EQs are amazing. Over time, and as our needs grow, I can pick up more.”

Ragland’s moved in his collection of gear and added some new pieces, including pairs of ATC SCM25A Pro and Yamaha NS-10M nearfield monitors. “I’m really into analog sound and trying to do as much out of the box as I can,” says Ragland. “I find it’s a much more enjoyable workflow and a more creative way to put mixes together.”

Studio Showcase: Fever Recording Runs Hot

Studio Showcase: L.A. Studio Follows Its Muse

Ragland intends to continue taking projects to Echo Mountain. “We have no aspirations of being a commercial recording studio. In addition to my own workload, there are a couple of younger producers and engineers coming in a few days a month, but we’re not advertising day rates.”

Mastering engineer Ryan Schilling of American Vinyl Company has now moved his Neumann VMS 66 lathe into WWNC’s former control room. “We’re going to be able to offer vinyl mastering services on site for our pressing clients,” says Ragland. He plans to engage Schilling’s services to offer local and touring artists and their fans limited-edition vinyl keepsakes of in-store performances in the first-floor space.

“It’s not the ideal time to be starting a business,” Ragland admits, “but vinyl sales are up 17 percent from last year. It’s one of these industries that’s grown—not despite the pandemic but because of it.”

Citizen Vinyl • www.citizenvinyl.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Studio Showcase: Fever Recording Runs Hot

Fever Recording underwent a remodel to give it more of a boutique hotel vibe, according to owner Eric Milos.
Fever Recording underwent a remodel to give it more of a boutique hotel vibe, according to owner Eric Milos. Sven Doornkaat

North Hollywood, CA (November 3, 2020—Fever Recording owner Eric Milos recently swapped out the aging Solid State Logic 4048G console for an SSL Duality Delta Pro-Station desk in the facility’s main control room. “It sounds great, it looks great and the functionality, with Pro Tools control on the surface and the marriage of the console automation with the Pro Tools automation system, really gives you the best of both worlds,” he says.

Milos acquired Fever Recording, formerly owned and operated by multi-Grammy-winning producer and songwriter Warryn Campbell, at the tail end of 2016. The main studio, with its own tracking room, lounge and kitchen, is separate from the rest of the building, the other half of which houses three production rooms, rented to long-term clients, with shared amenities.

“There’s a gated back parking lot where you can pull in and walk straight into the studio. We’ve had a number of artists in who appreciate that privacy,” he says.

Milos, originally from Ohio, graduated from Berklee College of Music in 2010 and cut his engineering teeth at Henson Recording Studios in Hollywood. He subsequently hired on as an engineer at Clear Lake Recording, which chief audio engineer Brian Levi established in 1987. In 2012, Milos purchased the Clear Lake facility and much of the equipment in it.

Clear Lake’s Studio A was designed by George Augspurger. “It’s got a really great Trident 80B console. It has been a great tracking room for all of its life, with a wonderful sounding drum room and a great grand piano. We do everything—every style, every type of session,” says Milos, from large ensembles to solo vocals.

Studio Showcase: L.A. Studio Follows Its Muse

Pro Tools Ultimate and a Studer A827 tape machine are both available. Outboard, there is a Neve sidecar and various pieces of vintage Pultec, Eventide and Lexicon gear alongside some of the newer studio standard gear, plus classic Neumann, Sony and other tube mics. “There’s also a nice smattering of modern mics. We’ve never not had enough microphones for a session,” he says.

“When I took over, probably half the cool vintage equipment there. I could never dream of spending the money you would have to pay for it now.”

Fever Recording's control room is centered around a SSL Duality console
Fever Recording’s control room is centered around a SSL Duality console. Sven Doornkaat

Milos built a B room in 2016 to handle overdubs, vocals, tracking and mixing. “It’s got an Avid D-Command and a basic set of outboard. We do a lot of vocal overdubs in there, for all genres of music, and we do a little bit of 5.1 mixing and some ADR.”

Two small production rooms, designated C and D, are leased out on a monthly basis. “In one room, we have a composer who has been with us for three or four years,” he says.

Fever Recording, located a couple of miles west along Burbank Blvd., underwent a bit of a remodel along with the Duality desk upgrade, says Milos, to give it more of a boutique hotel vibe. “We also got a few pieces of outboard gear, like the SSL Fusion, which everybody has been loving. The price-to-fun ratio has been excellent.”

The control room door barely cleared the old short-loaded 64-frame 4000G desk. “It was too big for the room. This Duality fits, and it looks like a spaceship,” says Milos, who bought the console, formerly at a N. Hollywood recording school, through Vintage King.

“I’ve done a couple of mixes on it; it’s so much fun and clients have been loving the Duality. I couldn’t be happier.”

Nestled in the control room is a well-appointed credenza of outboard gear.
Nestled in the control room is a well-appointed
credenza of outboard gear. Sven Doornkaat

The Duality behaves more like an SSL 9000 series desk, he says. “We can push it a little bit harder than a 4k. There have been occasions where we were getting a little bit of distortion on the master buss of the 4k, because we didn’t have the headroom for a massive 808.”

On the subject of headroom and 808 kick drums, Milos has also bolstered the Bryston-powered Augspurger main monitor system at Fever. “I added some dual-18 Meyer Sound subwoofers that I saw on Craigslist. It’s a great full-range system when you switch up to the mains. For the most part, people are up on the mains when they’re doing production and getting a feel for the song. Then they switch to the ATC25A nearfields for tracking and mixing, for more detail.” There is also a pair of Yamaha NS-10s.

“Anybody familiar with the 4k pretty much gets the Duality right away. In that studio, we do a lot of hip-hop and top-40 stuff, so there’s a lot of production—keyboards and that kind of stuff—and not a lot of full tracking. The Duality is nice for the situation where there are 20 people in the control room, and everything is interfaced, and being able to control Pro Tools.”

Fever Recording • www.feverrecording.com

Clear Lake Recording • www.clearlakerecordingstudios.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Studio Showcase: L.A. Studio Follows Its Muse

The control room space in Mad Muse Studios is centered around a vintage SSL 8000 G+ desk with a pedigree, having been used to record the likes of Michael Jackson, Dr. Dre and Eminem, among others, when it resided at Ocean Way Recording.
The control room space in Mad Muse Studios is centered around a vintage SSL 8000 G+ desk with a pedigree, having been used to record the likes of Michael Jackson, Dr. Dre and Eminem, among others, when it resided at Ocean Way Recording.

Los Angeles, CA (September 30, 2020)—The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted businesses around the world, but it has also offered some new opportunities. For In Flight Music Group (IMFG) in downtown Los Angeles, the city’s lockdown order was a chance to rebrand and relaunch its recording studio and soundstage under a new name: Mad Muse Studios.

For a couple of years, clients have been confusing the company and its facility, originally named In Flight Music Studios, says Zulma Tercero, studio manager. “During COVID-19, we decided to take the time to separate the two entities.” With that in mind, IMFG is now comprised of three partners—Matt Salazar (CEO), Tercero (COO), and Lucas Flood (CMO)—and the company in turn owns the studio, making it only one of IMFG’s offerings.

Salazar and Tercero launched IMFG in 2011, initially as a music publishing and management resource for new artists. But Salazar, who had been collecting audio gear and recording bands since his teens, missed music production.

Truth be told, he’d been somewhat knocked back by the demise of an earlier venture, L.A. Sound Gallery, a studio he opened in 2008 with his brother Jason in the former Evergreen Studios facility in Burbank. “Me being a young man—I was 25—and not knowing what the hell I was doing, other than having grown up in the music business, I never thought I’d have another music studio again,” says Salazar.

But when Lucas Flood joined IMFG in a marketing role, organizing live showcases for up-and-coming songwriters under the Writer’s Block moniker, he bugged Salazar to get back behind a console. “Luke came along and said, ‘What the hell are you doing, not producing music anymore?’ I wasn’t really engaging with artists that much,” says Salazar.

Inspired by the news that Warner Bros., Spotify and others might be moving into the downtown area, the trio found a 1,000-square-foot space in which to build out a modest studio. Two years later, they had the lease yanked from under them and the tech companies had largely turned their sights on Hollywood.

CMO Lucas Flood, CEO Matt Salazar and COO Zulma Tercero recently relaunched their open-space, downtown L.A. facility as Mad Muse Studios
CMO Lucas Flood, CEO Matt Salazar and COO Zulma Tercero recently relaunched their open-space, downtown L.A. facility as Mad Muse Studios

They found a new location that offered four times the floor space near downtown Los Angeles’ Fashion District. Having visited The Church in London when it was an open-plan studio, Salazar had no intention of dividing the new space up. “I’d say 90 percent of the time when I’m working with an artist, they want to be with me in the control room,” he says, or else hidden away in an iso booth.

The idea of the traditional studio is changing, Salazar believes, so control room glass would have been an impediment. “Maybe it’s them getting used to the bedroom way of doing things. It’s the new comfortable, especially with younger artists.”

The large, open floor plan offers “a killer drum sound,” according to Flood, and has also proved attractive to film production companies and ad agencies as a soundstage. “Once we started to get film production companies in here for walk-throughs and, inevitably, sessions, the feedback was incredible and the business started to take a path of its own,” says Flood.

Tercero, formerly a makeup artist, looks after that side of the business. “I handle the film department. My guys do a really great job,” she says, noting the ample parking and crew facilities. Recent projects have included The Head and the Heart, recording for the Alzheimer’s Association, and a Wells Fargo commercial. “Recently, Vintage Trouble came in and we did a documentary,” she says.

Studio Showcase: Funk Studios, Salt Lake City
Studio Showcase: The Record House

Now as CMO, Flood has developed Writer’s Block to the point where it hosts regular songwriter and label showcases across the country. Presenting a minimum of 10 songwriters a night, Writer’s Block showcases 1,000 songwriters a year, connecting up-and-comers with Salazar and IFMG as labels, publishers and agencies send their new signings to showcase in front of receptive audiences that are fans of the Writer’s Block brand.

Salazar recalls that L.A. Sound Gallery had been working on a Michael Jackson album shortly before Jackson’s untimely death in 2009. Ocean Way Recording owner Allan Sides was helping Salazar build a second, smaller room for the singer, and they had talked about Dr. Dre moving out of Sides’ Record One facility at the end of his years-long lockout, taking the SSL 8000 G+ desk with him. That console is now at Mad Muse Studios.

“The console was in pieces in Eminem’s basement, we found out later,” says Salazar, who was alerted to the board by Vintage King’s Jeff Ehrenberg. “The tech drove it out here and we cut it down to 64 inputs. We took about a year to re-cap and re-chip it. We put an Atomic power supply on it, and we added the THD Tangerine [VCA automation Pro Tools interface]. It’s a beast. It sounds incredible.

Mad Muse has racks and racks of outboard gear and stacks of backline gear and drums. Salazar caught the collecting bug growing up in Fresno, CA, he says. “I started when eBay first started happening in the ’90s; it was the Wild West. I bought my first pair of Neve 2254s when I was 15. They were broken, so I took them to Dave Marquette [of Marquette Audio Labs] in Hayward.”

Salazar says, “It’s a hobby that bears fruit when you put up a drum and it sounds incredible and you know you got it to that point yourself, especially with the old stuff. But you need to understand it. I only know enough about electronics to get myself shocked! But I understand how the bias of a guitar amplifier will affect the tone and interact with the transformer. The artist doesn’t need to know that you know all that, but you can make the right choices as a producer. All they know is they plug in and it sounds phenomenal and we can get working.”

There’s plenty of new gear, too. “The CAPI Heider preamps are amazing. We don’t use Neves; we have 32 channels of those. I’ve always liked recording everything with the same preamp. I feel like it all comes together in a certain way,” says Salazar. “That was one thing that changed the way I record, but the sound of the facility did, too, because it’s part of everything we do.”

Mad Muse Studios • www.madmusestudios.com

IFMG • www.inflightmusicgroup.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Enviyon Grows from the Garage to the Future

Over the course of 10 years, Romel Williams (center) has grown Enviyon Entertainment from a parttime gig in his garage to a fully staffed multi-studio facility.
Over the course of 10 years, Romel Williams (center) has grown Enviyon Entertainment from a part-time gig in his garage to a fully staffed multi-studio facility.

Chicago, IL (July 29, 2020)—Since establishing a studio in his home’s garage, Enviyon Entertainment owner Romel Williams—better known simply as Will—has been sensible about building his business, only upgrading his gear and expanding his facilities as his finances have allowed. It’s been a long road, but Williams is now celebrating a decade in business with the recent addition of a podcasting studio and the introduction of Enception, a latency- beating remote recording service.

With a long history as a musician dating back to high school, Williams started out making beats in the living room of his house in Country Club Hills, a southern suburb of the Chicago metropolitan area. “It wasn’t a lot of equipment—just a MIDI keyboard, a laptop and an interface,” he said. But he moved out to the garage once he started a family because his young daughter liked to mess around with the controls.

“In the summertime, I would open the door because it would be hot in there. People from the neighborhood would walk by and ask, ‘Hey, is this a studio?’ And I’d say, ‘I guess it is!’ So it all started by accident.”

Before taking on any clients, Williams worked on his production chops. “I wasn’t so much into engineering yet because I didn’t have anybody to record, so I would practice on my own vocals,” he said.

Not only are Chicago summers very hot but winters are very cold, so as his recording clientele expanded, he decided to get out of the garage and find a commercial space. “But I knew the equipment I had would not be sufficient. People wouldn’t want to come into a commercial studio and see an old-school Mbox 1 and a laptop and be charged whatever I would have to charge because of the overhead that I had,” said Williams, who was still holding down a day job at the time.

“While I was in the first rental space, in 2012, I would buy a piece of equipment with every paycheck. I’d get a check and buy a mixer; get another paycheck and buy a mic. It took me a whole year. For that year, I paid rent, electricity, gas and insurance because I didn’t have enough equipment to open the studio. It was a long struggle, but when you have a vision, you just keep doing it—even though they tell you that you’re crazy.”

Studio B of Enviyon’s four-room facility centers around a Universal Audio Apollo 8XP interface and a 48-channel Mackie board.
Studio B of Enviyon’s four-room facility centers around a Universal Audio Apollo 8XP interface and a 48-channel Mackie board.

The commercial space, a former dental office at the end of a row of storefronts in a local strip mall, needed remodeling to work as a studio. Looking back, he said, “I didn’t realize how important construction was. You’ve got to soundproof everything.”

Fortunately, Williams is good with his hands and was able to do much of the work himself, including building studio furniture and a novel dual-computer display for his DAW. “I built it in 2013,” he recalls, before he was even aware of the Slate Raven, which it resembles. “I didn’t even realize there was a system like that,” he said. “I’m very handy so I just took some wood and made it, and it’s been that way ever since.”

Studio Showcase: The Record House

The original room, Studio A, was a success, and Williams soon found himself needing to expand. “The store next door was a clothing store, and the one next to that, they did some dance exercise, and the fourth store was a hair salon. When the opportunities arose, I would take the space. I grew from one to the next and ended up obtaining all four storefronts.”

Many of Enviyon’s clients are from the worlds of hip-hop and dance music, and over the years have come to include the likes of 147 Callboy, DramaGirl, DJ Casper, G-Herbo, Queen Key and the late Juice WRLD. But while those productions typically involve a lot of collaboration in the control room, Williams designed his next room, Studio B, in the second storefront, for versatility. The room offers several iso booths to accommodate live tracking of musicians and vocalists.

“We’re running everything through an Apollo 8XP interface,” he said of the B room. “I have a 48-channel Mackie board in there as well, but I really like the clean sound of the 8XP.”

Studio C features multiple booths for multitracking vocals, instruments and more.
Studio C features multiple booths for multitracking vocals, instruments and more.

By the time Enviyon had expanded into the fourth storefront, Williams and his staff had a different plan for Studio D, too. “When we built Studio D, we had a lot of different ideas on how we wanted it to be. I didn’t want a conventional studio; I wanted it to do more than one thing.”

As a result, Williams has added a podcast studio in Studio D, outfitted with Shure SM7B mics, that enables artists to move straight into marketing mode at the end of their project. “As soon as they’re done, they can go over to the podcast area to be interviewed,” Williams offers as an example. “We can do a livestream from there or record the audio professionally.”

The entire facility operates on Pro Tools, he added. “If I’m not available, it’s easy for another engineer to access a recording session from another studio using the network and pick up where we left off.”

With fortuitous timing, Williams introduced Enception just as the COVID-19 lockdown began. The new service flips the script on typical remote recording workflows and offers additional growth potential for the business. Devised in collaboration with several developers and similar to commercially available remote access and support software, Enception enables the Enviyon engineer to take control of the artist’s home workstation. “The artist doesn’t hear any latency because the recording is at their end,” he said. “There’s maybe a second of latency at the engineer’s end, but that’s fine. Then we can either mix it live or mix it at the studio and send them a copy.”

Most importantly, the service gives the client real-time feedback. “That’s what people want,” said Williams. “People still want to come to the studio if they can, but this is a great idea for those who can’t, or who are out of state or are overseas. That’s who we’re targeting with this program.”

Enviyon Entertainment • https://www.enviyon.com/

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com