Tag Archives: studer

Evertz Acquires Studer from Harman

Evertz acquires StuderBurlington, Ontario, Canada (January 13, 2021)—Canadian broadcast equipment company Evertz Technologies Limited is purchasing the legacy recording/broadcast studio gear brand Studer from Harman Professional Solutions. The deal, arranged for an undisclosed amount, sees the brand and all related assets and technology move to Evertz.

Studer has played a vital role in the development of recording technology over the years. First formed in Zürich, Switzerland by namesake Willi Studer in 1948, the company quickly gained notoriety for its tape machines, which went on to be used around the world in countless recording studios during the analog tape era.

Studer sold his company in 1990 to Motor-Columbus AG, which in turn sold the various Studer brands to Harman International in 1994. In the years that followed, Studer began producing broadcast consoles, including the long-running Vista line, and Harman eventually merged many of Studer’s operations with its other console brand, Soundcraft. While the heart of the Studer brand remained in Switzerland for decades, Harman ultimately shuttered the brand’s Swiss-based R&D and management offices in 2018 as part of the global restructuring of Harman Pro brands around international centers of excellence. That move came after Harman itself was acquired by Samsung in 2016.

Evertz says it plans to invest in Studer, aiding the brand’s development of “next-generation products” with an eye towards building synergies between its current product suite and the Studer product line.

In a statement, Brian Campbell, EVP Business Development at Evertz, noted, “We’re pleased to welcome this iconic audio brand to our Evertz family of products and solutions that has been serving the broadcast market for more than 50 years. We also welcome the many valued Studer customers who depend on Studer technology and reliability to deliver the best audio to their audience.”

Evertz • www.evertz.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Studio Showcase: Fever Recording Runs Hot

Fever Recording underwent a remodel to give it more of a boutique hotel vibe, according to owner Eric Milos.
Fever Recording underwent a remodel to give it more of a boutique hotel vibe, according to owner Eric Milos. Sven Doornkaat

North Hollywood, CA (November 3, 2020—Fever Recording owner Eric Milos recently swapped out the aging Solid State Logic 4048G console for an SSL Duality Delta Pro-Station desk in the facility’s main control room. “It sounds great, it looks great and the functionality, with Pro Tools control on the surface and the marriage of the console automation with the Pro Tools automation system, really gives you the best of both worlds,” he says.

Milos acquired Fever Recording, formerly owned and operated by multi-Grammy-winning producer and songwriter Warryn Campbell, at the tail end of 2016. The main studio, with its own tracking room, lounge and kitchen, is separate from the rest of the building, the other half of which houses three production rooms, rented to long-term clients, with shared amenities.

“There’s a gated back parking lot where you can pull in and walk straight into the studio. We’ve had a number of artists in who appreciate that privacy,” he says.

Milos, originally from Ohio, graduated from Berklee College of Music in 2010 and cut his engineering teeth at Henson Recording Studios in Hollywood. He subsequently hired on as an engineer at Clear Lake Recording, which chief audio engineer Brian Levi established in 1987. In 2012, Milos purchased the Clear Lake facility and much of the equipment in it.

Clear Lake’s Studio A was designed by George Augspurger. “It’s got a really great Trident 80B console. It has been a great tracking room for all of its life, with a wonderful sounding drum room and a great grand piano. We do everything—every style, every type of session,” says Milos, from large ensembles to solo vocals.

Studio Showcase: L.A. Studio Follows Its Muse

Pro Tools Ultimate and a Studer A827 tape machine are both available. Outboard, there is a Neve sidecar and various pieces of vintage Pultec, Eventide and Lexicon gear alongside some of the newer studio standard gear, plus classic Neumann, Sony and other tube mics. “There’s also a nice smattering of modern mics. We’ve never not had enough microphones for a session,” he says.

“When I took over, probably half the cool vintage equipment there. I could never dream of spending the money you would have to pay for it now.”

Fever Recording's control room is centered around a SSL Duality console
Fever Recording’s control room is centered around a SSL Duality console. Sven Doornkaat

Milos built a B room in 2016 to handle overdubs, vocals, tracking and mixing. “It’s got an Avid D-Command and a basic set of outboard. We do a lot of vocal overdubs in there, for all genres of music, and we do a little bit of 5.1 mixing and some ADR.”

Two small production rooms, designated C and D, are leased out on a monthly basis. “In one room, we have a composer who has been with us for three or four years,” he says.

Fever Recording, located a couple of miles west along Burbank Blvd., underwent a bit of a remodel along with the Duality desk upgrade, says Milos, to give it more of a boutique hotel vibe. “We also got a few pieces of outboard gear, like the SSL Fusion, which everybody has been loving. The price-to-fun ratio has been excellent.”

The control room door barely cleared the old short-loaded 64-frame 4000G desk. “It was too big for the room. This Duality fits, and it looks like a spaceship,” says Milos, who bought the console, formerly at a N. Hollywood recording school, through Vintage King.

“I’ve done a couple of mixes on it; it’s so much fun and clients have been loving the Duality. I couldn’t be happier.”

Nestled in the control room is a well-appointed credenza of outboard gear.
Nestled in the control room is a well-appointed
credenza of outboard gear. Sven Doornkaat

The Duality behaves more like an SSL 9000 series desk, he says. “We can push it a little bit harder than a 4k. There have been occasions where we were getting a little bit of distortion on the master buss of the 4k, because we didn’t have the headroom for a massive 808.”

On the subject of headroom and 808 kick drums, Milos has also bolstered the Bryston-powered Augspurger main monitor system at Fever. “I added some dual-18 Meyer Sound subwoofers that I saw on Craigslist. It’s a great full-range system when you switch up to the mains. For the most part, people are up on the mains when they’re doing production and getting a feel for the song. Then they switch to the ATC25A nearfields for tracking and mixing, for more detail.” There is also a pair of Yamaha NS-10s.

“Anybody familiar with the 4k pretty much gets the Duality right away. In that studio, we do a lot of hip-hop and top-40 stuff, so there’s a lot of production—keyboards and that kind of stuff—and not a lot of full tracking. The Duality is nice for the situation where there are 20 people in the control room, and everything is interfaced, and being able to control Pro Tools.”

Fever Recording • www.feverrecording.com

Clear Lake Recording • www.clearlakerecordingstudios.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Doshi Audio EVO Series Tape Head Preamplifier | Review

I had a fantastic time putting the most excellent Doshi Audio Tape Head Preamplifier through its paces. This latest version, labeled the EVO series, has some improvements over the previous Tape Head Preamplifier 3.0 series, but permit me to reminisce a bit first… A Long Time Ago In A Recording Studio Far, Far Away Sitting behind an enormous API console as I peered through the glass to watch the musicians in the tracking room, I heard the last bit of decay from the final chord and cymbal crash fade to silence. I hit stop, then the rewind button on the MCI JH-110 2” 24 track machine. I mashed the talkback button and asked the band to come in and hear the take. When all were gathered in the control room, I hit play. It was a big sonic letdown. In different situations, the disappointment was sometimes extreme, sometimes minimal and on a few very special occasions, I felt the playback actually had an enhanced quality. But it was NEVER the same as the input. Sure, the music and performances were many times excellent and captivating, but why wouldn’t the tape deck serve up all that goodness that I heard going to the [...]

Original Resource is Part-Time Audiophile