Tag Archives: Recording

Pro Sound News’ Top 10 Stories of All-Time

PSN Top 10 Stories of 2021Here are PSN‘s Top 10 most popular stories of all-time, as ranked by Google Analytics. PSN has merged with Mix over at Mixonline.com; find us there, and also check out the revamped Mix weekday newsletter (get your free subscription at https://bit.ly/3gVh4Gf).

10. Software Tech: 96 kHz vs. 44.1 kHz—Let’s Settle This By Craig Anderton. Ever since we’ve had a choice of sample rates, there’s been controversy over whether higher sample rates sound better.

9. Bringing the Grateful Dead’s Wall of Sound Back to Life By Clive Young. Tribute act Dead On Live teams with Asbury Audio to replicate the legendary Wall of Sound concert audio system.

8. Timbaland’s VA Studio Hits the Market By Clive Young. The R&B megaproducer’s Virginia Beach studio complex is up for sale, along with its gear.

7. Monitor Engineer Michael Mule, Dead at 57 By Clive Young. Monitor engineer Michael Mule worked with everyone from Iron Maiden to Anita Baker across a nearly 40-year career that began at CBGB.

6. Seen on the Scene: 2019 NAMM Show, Day One By Clive Young. Dive into our huge photo gallery for all the new products, sights and hoopla of Day One.

5. Bose S1 Pro Multi-Position P.A. System – A Real-World Review By Jordan Kaplan. Bose’s first portable PA under $1,000 delivers considerable bang for the buck.

4. Behind the Scenes of the Grammys’ Live Sound By Steve Harvey. Providing live sound for an audience composed of the top music artists and executives is no easy task.

3. AKM Factory Fire—A Pro-Audio Industry Disaster By Clive Young. An 82-hour fire in AKM’s semiconductor factory is already hurting numerous top pro-audio manufacturers around the globe.

2. Finneas on Producing Billie Eilish’s Hit Album in his Bedroom By Steve Harvey. Finneas O’Connell—Billie Eilish’s co-writer, producer, older brother and an artist in his own right—discusses recording her sonically adventurous debut at their family home.

1. Police Photos Reveal First Look Inside Prince’s Legendary Tape Vault By Clive Young. Prince’s tape vault, rumored to contain thousands of unreleased songs, was a musical urban myth until his 2016 death, when photos taken by police investigators revealed that the rumors were true.

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Pro Sound News’ Top 5 Recording Stories of All-Time

PSN Top 5 Recording Stories of All-TimeHere are PSN‘s Top-5 most popular recording stories of all-time, as ranked by Google Analytics. PSN has merged with Mix over at Mixonline.com; find us there, and also check out the revamped Mix weekday newsletter (get your free subscription at https://bit.ly/3gVh4Gf).

5. Software Tech: 96 kHz vs. 44.1 kHz—Let’s Settle This By Craig Anderton. Ever since we’ve had a choice of sample rates, there’s been controversy over whether higher sample rates sound better.

4. Recording Studios Are Not Dying By Clive Young. USA Today says recording studios are a dying industry. That’s dead wrong—and here’s why.

3. Timbaland’s VA Studio Hits the Market By Clive Young. The R&B megaproducer’s Virginia Beach studio complex is up for sale, along with its gear.

2. Finneas on Producing Billie Eilish’s Hit Album in his Bedroom By Steve Harvey. Finneas O’Connell—Billie Eilish’s co-writer, producer, older brother and an artist in his own right—discusses recording her sonically adventurous debut at their family home.

1. Police Photos Reveal First Look Inside Prince’s Legendary Tape Vault By Clive Young. Prince’s tape vault, rumored to contain thousands of unreleased songs, was a musical urban myth until his 2016 death, when photos taken by police investigators revealed that the rumors were true.

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Pro Sound News’ Top 5 Stories of 2021 (So Far)

PSN Top 5 Stories of 2021 (so far)Here are PSN‘s Top-5 most popular articles of 2021 so far, as ranked by Google Analytics. PSN has merged with Mix over at Mixonline.com; find us there, and also check out the revamped Mix weekday newsletter (get your free subscription at https://bit.ly/3gVh4Gf).

5. From Purge to Perfection: Illangelo on Producing The Weeknd’s After Hours By Keith Nelson. After selling off his studio gear in order to leave the music business, Grammy-winning producer Illangelo returned to the fold, spending a year working on The Weeknd’s hit album After Hours.

4. The Lost Treasure of Joe Meek’s Tea Chest Tapes By Steve Harvey. Legendary UK producer Joe Meek left behind nearly 1,900 tapes when he committed suicide in the 1960s. After sitting in storage for 50-plus years, the ‘lost’ tapes are being digitized in a mammoth 18-month project, saving unheard early work by David Bowie, Ray Davies, Ritchie Blackmore, Marc Bolan, Steve Marriott, Gene Vincent and more.

3. Audacity Acquired By Muse Group By Clive Young. Audacity, the long-running open source, cross-platform audio editor, has been acquired by Muse Group.

2. Pirate Sees Self-Service Studio Market for the Taking By Steve Harvey. Having conquered the UK, Pirate aims to build 4,000 unattended, self-service studios across North America by 2024.

1. Capitol Riot Loots, Damages Live Sound Systems By Clive Young. In January, rioters at the U.S. Capitol stole and vandalized live sound equipment that Maryland Sound International had onsite for the presidential inauguration.

 

 

 

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

PRO SOUND NEWS MOVES TO MIX

Dear Pro Sound News Reader—

PSN and Mix are merging. We are combining both iconic pro-audio news brands, bringing together the best features of each under the Mix name.

Starting in July, you’ll find all the great stuff you come here for—our Real-World Reviews, our trademark live sound coverage, industry analysis and more—over at mixonline.com.

To be clear, PRO SOUND NEWS is still bringing you the latest pro-audio coverage, just over at Mix. Same staff, same crucial news, different website and magazine.

PSN subscribers will start receiving Mix with its July, 2021 issue. Since we’re cramming two magazines into one, Mix will be growing in size, giving you even more to read and discover.

Also, starting July 6, the Mix SmartBrief email newsletter will increase to FIVE days a week to add all of PSN‘s coverage. Set up your free subscription now at https://bit.ly/3gVh4Gf so you can keep up on the latest pro audio news.

We’re looking forward to bringing you more of the great content you read PSN for, so we’ll see you in the pages of Mix!

Clive Young

Content Director, Pro Sound News (and now Mix!)

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

HEAR Rethinks Remote Recording

John Harris of HEAR
John Harris of HEAR

Burlington, NJ (June 21, 2021)—Technology eventually caught up to concept for John Harris and Jody Elff, two live music event mixers with a stack of awards between them. For more than 25 years, the pair had been pondering the practicality of remote production and finally, a year ago, hastened by the pandemic, their dreams became a reality.

Way back in the day, says Elff, a Grammy-winning audio engineer, sound artist and designer, the conversation was kickstarted when the band he was touring with needed to record a show. “It really needed a remote music truck,” he says, “but nobody wanted to pay for it. I thought, if I could give someone control over the Pro Tools system next to me at front-of-house we could save ourselves a lot of hassle without adding an extra semi to the tour.”

Fast-forward a couple of decades and little had changed—the industry paradigm was still typically to move dozens of channels from the stage to a truck or control room. As producers pivoted to work-from-home workflows, “We were still trying to ship all this audio over the internet, which is really hard and unpredictable,” Elff says.

While collaborating with Solid State Logic, which was seeking to meet the WFH mixing challenge with System T, they had a eureka moment. “We need to control the mixer that’s on stage; that has to do all the work,” says Harris, who has numerous Emmys, Grammys and a Peabody Award to his name. The preamps, recorder and mixer need to sit stage-side. “And we need to accurately and dependably control and hear that system,” he says, from their remote mixing locations.

“Once we started going down that road, it was pretty straight forward,” says Harris. A couple of months into the initial 2020 lockdown, the pair launched a partnership, HEAR (Harris Elff Audio Resources), offering remote music mixing services from their respective similarly equipped facilities in New Jersey and New York.

One of HEAR’s first gigs was recording Diana: The Musical, a Broadway show closed by the lockdown the week it was to have opened. “We recorded for five days with me in my studio, John in his, handing off monitoring and mixing capabilities, and sent it to Skywalker Sound for mixing,” says Elff. The show will premiere on Netflix on Oct. 1.

Capturing a Grammy Awards Like No Other

Harris and Elff are also part of Remote Production Group, a “strategic alliance of like-minded folks,” as Harris describes it. RemotePro includes several key members based in Nashville who provide video services for remote live productions. Together, they have produced live events such as the iHeartCountry Radio festival and performances from the Anyway Café in Manhattan.

Key to the technological breakthrough that has enabled HEAR’s offering is a patent-pending IP tunneling scheme that Elff co-developed with RemotePro’s IT guru, Greg Green. “We’ve effectively moved the control of a console surface in my studio or John’s studio to a Pro Tools system next to the stage,” says Elff. Any number of surfaces can log on and off via the tunnel, offering failsafe redundancy.

With no need to move dozens of audio channels across the internet, HEAR can generate a broadcast mix at any resolution up to 24-bit/192 kHz. Control data passes between the stage and remote studios, but only monitoring audio is transported to the mixers.

Using Unity Connect, a 64-channel high-resolution audio streaming solution developed by Chuck Downs, “We’re sending back our monitoring audio—which can be a stereo or 5.1 mix plus PFL—and whatever else we need that’s independent of what goes to broadcast,” says Elff. “It’s fast, very good quality and it’s a very secure network.”

For any event, the pair ship a couple of racks equipped with up to 128 channels of Millennia mic preamps and a Pro Tools Ultimate primary computer plus an independent backup recording computer, all Dante-networked using Focusrite interfaces, to the location. For smaller productions, they offer a rig with a 16-input Dante-enabled SSL Net I/O SB i16 interface.

There are broadcast console and workstation manufacturers offering remote solutions, typically requiring duplicate surfaces and DSP at either end. “But none of them have as integrated and comprehensive a hardware-software partnership as Avid does with their consoles and their software,” says Harris.

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Music, Etc.: Russell Jamie Johnson – Finding the Path Forward

Russell Jamie Johnson
Russell Jamie Johnson

You may have seen Russell Jamie Johnson working as an archer, knife thrower and stunt double if you’ve watched Aquaman, Robin Hood (2018) or the TV series Elementary, Sneaky Pete or Orange is the New Black. But those roles just pay the bills.

Growing up in the Midwest, Johnson learned archery almost before he could walk, thanks to his father who started an archery business, hand-crafting bows and arrows, after leaving the Navy. But when his dad died in a plane crash while Johnson was still in his teens, the die was cast for him to—eventually—pursue a career in music.

Johnson, 27, who played in bands while at school but never expected music to be a career, is now working toward his first full-length record. To that end, he’s been dropping the occasional track, most recently releasing “Tenth and Canal.” It follows close on the heels of “Put Me Out,” about a relationship Johnson had while living in Boston, where he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in songwriting from Berklee College of Music.

Via Zoom from his home in Brooklyn, Johnson talks about his career and recording at local studio Conveyor, owned by fellow Berklee alum Andrew Sheron.

On the Path to a Music Career:

Within a year after my dad died, I was in military boarding school. Two years later, I went to Berklee. If my dad hadn’t died, I never would have gone to Culver [Military Academy]; I never would have met my music teacher, who never would have suggested Berklee College of Music; and I wouldn’t be a songwriter now. I didn’t know what I wanted to do with music. I wrote my first song after he died, and I just kept doing it. When I think about it now, it’s a powerful image in my head, that you’re the sum of every moment in your life.

My sister is a classical pianist. My mother was an old hippie that joined the Navy; I was hearing James Taylor from her. My dad loved big band. And my brother was a songwriter for a while. So I was exposed to a lot of different things. When I was 16, I wanted to be the Beatles; when I was 18, I wanted to be the Stones. But then I started getting into lyrical writers. I had the background of listening to Bob Dylan—who’s a better lyric writer than him? The stories behind the songs were what really got me. One of the albums that really inspired me was Ryan Adams’ Heartbreaker. Gillian Welch is a hell of a songwriter and I also got heavily into Jason Isbell; I love his lyrics—and he’s a hell of a guitar player.

On the Path to a Full-Length:

I’m working with my violinist, Chase Potter, and I met a British duo, the Ruen Brothers [Harry and Rupert Stansall]. They moved to Brooklyn; their first record was produced by Rick Rubin. Rupert heard one of my tracks and said, “I’d love to help you out.” When I write songs I’m more lyric-based, but Rupert has these amazing ideas. Like on “Put Me Out,” which has a very Americana vibe; it has a mellotron in the background, which I never would have thought to use.

“Tenth and Canal” started as an acoustic track, very much in the Heartbreaker vein. A friend of mine spotted a 1967 Princeton Reverb; I bought it and was so excited to use the thing. I said, “Why don’t we play it faster and make it into a rock song?” I plugged straight into the Princeton with my Strat; no pedals, just cranked the reverb and cranked the volume to get that crunch, and that was it.

I’m very blessed to know really great players. Danae [Greenfield] plays keys; she just played on John Legend’s album. The slide part is my favorite part. That’s my friend Charlie Kendall; he plays all the lead parts on my songs and gets such a great tone.

I would have loved to get a full band together and record an album in a few days in a studio; that’s the way I’m used to doing things. But with the pandemic, it became a little slower than I hoped.

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Canadore College Launches New Recording Program

Canadore College is using a new SSL Origin analog in-line mixing console to teach students.
Canadore College is using a new SSL Origin analog in-line mixing console to teach students.

North Bay, ON, Canada (June 16, 2021)—Canadore College, an applied arts and technology school 180 north of Toronto, is using a new SSL Origin analog in-line mixing console to teach students the similarities and differences between music production hardware and software.

“A lot of our students are used to using the computer and have never worked on a console; they’re not familiar with what a console is capable of,” says Ben Leggett, professor and coordinator on the new two-year Recording Engineering – Music Production program at Canadore College. Leggett is a Juno Award-nominated producer, engineer and mixer working in music production and film post production, and also has his own recording studio in North Bay.

“I wanted to get the Origin because of the EQ on each channel, and how you can shape the sound with the four bands, just like you can in the computer,” he says. “So we’re able to show students how to apply EQ manually with a physical piece of equipment. Another big thing is getting students to understand how the routing works, and how it’s very much the same in a DAW and a console, and having that lightbulb go off.”

Peek Inside Hunter Hayes’ Home Studio with this Video Tour

For a generation of students that has only ever worked on a computer, the console also enables faculty members to highlight some of the differences between analog and digital audio processing. “Sonically, you can crank the console’s EQ knob all the way and it still sounds good, as opposed to digital, which sometimes doesn’t do the same thing,” says Leggett.

Plus, he says, “The sonic quality that the console will add when you push a signal into it is different. Depending on what you’re going for, you can push the signal louder into the SSL console and it will give you a different sound than pushing it into a computer program.”

The Origin was part of a complete studio package supplied by Studio Economik in Montreal, including an SSL Fusion processor. Leggett and other faculty members at the college installed, integrated and commissioned the new music production studio shortly before the program launched in September 2020. The new control room is housed in a former television broadcast studio on the campus that the college enlarged during summer 2020 to provide space for the recording engineering program.

Solid State Logic • www.solidstatelogic.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

The Record Co. Takes Different Approach to Boston Studio Scene

Boston-based recording services provider The Record Co. (TRC) opened a new facility in January encompassing four recording studios and 15 rehearsal rooms.
Boston-based recording services provider The Record Co. (TRC) opened a new facility in January encompassing four recording studios and 15 rehearsal rooms.

Boston, MA (June 16, 2021)—Boston-based recording services provider The Record Co. (TRC) opened a new facility in January encompassing four recording studios and 15 rehearsal rooms.

Founded in 2010 by Berklee College of Music graduate Matt McArthur, TRC is a 503(c) non-profit enterprise dedicated to offering an affordable and equitable music workspace and providing space and resources to the entire spectrum of the city’s music makers. The new 12,500-square-foot space in Boston’s Newmarket Industrial District is expected to host upwards of 1,000 sessions and rehearsals per month, running 16 hours a day. The various studios and rehearsal rooms are outfitted with Focusrite preamplifiers and interfaces as well as Novation MIDI controllers.

McArthur says the concept of TRC came to him a decade earlier as he was looking for a business model that would allow the greatest number of users to access a highly flexible facility that could accommodate music producers of any genre and virtually any skill level. “It needed to be a shared resource that no one really owns, a community resource,” he says. “We would need space, gear, a good attitude, and an open mind about how the space is used and who uses it. A non-profit was the way to go.”

Focusrite plc Acquires Sequential LLC

Focusrite solutions in use at TRC include the Red 16Line 64-In / 64-Out Thunderbolt 3 and Pro Tools | HD-compatible audio interface; the ISA 428 MkII and ISA 828 MkII devices; the RedNet A16R 16-channel analogue I/O interface; and a number of interfaces from the Scarlett Range, deployed in some of the 15 rehearsal studios in the new facility.

McArthur also realized that the nature of how recording studios are utilized now had changed significantly in recent years, with the large battleship consoles of yore giving way to a plethora of software applications and digital control surfaces. “Music makers today all have their own ways of working, their own preferred software and plug-ins,” he says. “That makes RedNet and the other Focusrite technology we selected the best fit for a facility like TRC this because of its expansive interfacing options and compatibility with almost any DAW.”

In partnership with The Boston Foundation and more than 500 donors, TRC has distributed more than 750 low-barrier COVID-relief grants to local musicians, producers and engineers experiencing lost income as a result of gig cancellations due to COVID-19. To date, it has distributed more than 750 grants totaling more than $160,000

Focusrite Pro • http://pro.focusrite.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Fuse Releases VREV-666 Freebie Plug-In

Fuse VREV-666 Freebie Plug-In
Fuse VREV-666 Freebie Plug-In

Duesseldorf, Germany (June 14, 2021)—Fuse Audio Labs has released VREV-666, a new, free reverb plug-in.

VREV-666 is based on a Sixties-vintage spring reverb originally built for the BBC, serving up bouncy and unpredictable vibes in its take on an electromechanical reverb. While Fuse Audio readily suggests that the results may not always be entirely faithfully representative, stating in its notes that “VREV-666 values character above realism,” the plug-in is nonetheless intended to provide an edgy, dirty vibe to audio.

Shure Launches Axient Digital ADX5D Portable Receiver

The original hardware featured a single effect gain control, but the VREV-666 adds an Effect Mix stage, a Pre-Delay of up to 150 ms, and a Tone EQ that attenuates the resonance of the spring system in the bass range. Meanwhile, an Effect Limiter built around a light bulb helps to tame peaks.

Fuse Audio Labs CEO Reimund Dratwa notes, “While the few available hardware units remain much cherished gems inside the studios of spirited artists and producers, we’re delighted to make the original vintage character of this juicy reverb available for everybody’s DAW absolutely for free.”

The VREV-666 plug-in is offered for free to anyone who creates a free account on the Fuse Audio Labs website.

Fuse Audio Labs • www.fuseaudiolabs.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Music Collaboration Platform Groovesetter Debuts

Groovesetter is a real-time, multichannel audio collaboration platform for streaming, performing and recording over high-speed internet.
Groovesetter is a real-time, multichannel audio collaboration platform for streaming, performing and recording over high-speed internet. Groovesetter

Los Angeles, CA (June 11, 2021)—Musicians have wanted to collaborate online with no syncing issues as long as the internet been around, and the latest service looking to conquer that challenge is Groovesetter, a real-time, multichannel audio collaboration platform for streaming, performing and recording over high-speed internet.

Noting that it offers “ultra-low latency, the service allows its subscribers to connect and interact from up to eight remote locations, allowing music creators to play, stream and record together from any location and capture digital data of the music production.

Groovesetter lays out simple interactive visual routing of audio signal flow and flexible connection settings. Optional virtual channels allow for cable-free, multi-channel connection between DAWs and OBS, all in the same session. With the low latency solution, it allows users to create combined interactive experiences on platforms such as Twitch, Facebook Live, & YouTube Live. Groovesetter’s metadata module makes the capture of information for each music session possible at the source of its creation.

Producing the ‘WTF with Marc Maron’ Podcast

Rouslan Ovtcharoff, CEO and co-founder, noted, “We’ve simplified a very complex connection process to an intuitive username and password experience and built useful tools into the platform that every creator will appreciate.”

A core team from Groovesetter’s technology partner BULPROS developed the platform. “We are excited to partner with Groovesetter and bring our deep technology expertise in the software development and the cloud infrastructure field to the creation of such an amazing audio platform for the music industry. I am thrilled with the fast and wide adoption of the Groovesetter platform by professionals and enthusiasts in the music field alike,” says Ivaylo Slavov, CEO of Bulpros.

Groovesetter • https://groovesetter.com/

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com