Tag Archives: Post and Broadcast

The Cinematic Sound of the ‘Sammy the Bull’ Podcast

 

Former Mafia hitman Salvatore 'Sammy The Bull' Gravano on the set of his podcast, recording through a Shure SM93 lavaliere microphone.
Former Mafia hitman Salvatore ‘Sammy The Bull’ Gravano on the set of his podcast, recording through a Shure SM93 lavaliere microphone.

Phoenix, Arizona (March 25, 2021)—Emmy-award winning sound designer and FX editor Angelo Palazzo has worked on blockbusters such as Disney’s Frozen, Stranger Things and Bridgerton, but he hit the curveball of a lifetime last year when COVID-19 brought the world to a standstill. Palazzo was working with filmmaker Robert Rodriguez on another project when the pandemic halted production one Friday afternoon in early 2020; by the following Monday, he was on board with Our Thing with Sammy the Bull, a Mafia podcast that puts his cinematic skills to use in a new format.

Emmy-award winning sound designer and FX editor Angelo Palazzo
Emmy-award winning sound designer and FX editor Angelo Palazzo

“I’m steeped in feature films and the TV world,” says Palazzo, “[and] it’s a real fine line when you’re putting sound to narration. The music is what is emotionally leading you through the story, but the sound design and sound effects root you in the reality of it. I didn’t wanna go too deep, because if you go too deep, then it can get corny.”

Instead of relying on gimmicky, on-the-nose audio cues that closely follow the action of a story—for example, the sound of a door creaking on its hinges when the protagonist walks into a dark room—Palazzo strives to put listeners in a scene without them even noticing.

“If it’s too literal, it can backfire, so when there was a major plot point, I wanted to kinda ease you into it and set you up for the big moment,” he says. “Then, slowly fade that reality out and bring you back in with just the narration with the music. If you’re nuanced about it, before they know it, you’re out of it and there was no distraction.”

Sammy the Bull with Richard Miller
Sammy the Bull (left) with podcast producer Richard Miller, the general manager of the Sammy the Bull organization.

The protagonist of Our Thing with Sammy the Bull is Salvatore Gravano, the notorious mobster whose hit list runs 19 murders deep and who served as underboss of the Gambino crime family under John Gotti.

Palazzo works with Richard Miller, the general manager of the Sammy the Bull organization, to produce each episode of Our Thing with Sammy the Bull. Miller, whose background is in seminar production, records the narration with Gravano on a Shure SM93 lavaliere microphone (Gravano’s preference over typical podcasting models) into a Zoom H6 recorder. Miller says they’ve since moved on to the Shure MX150 lavaliere, which doesn’t pick up as much ambient sound.

After a few rounds of editing in Adobe Audition, the narration tracks and archival sound clips go to Palazzo for placement and mixing with the score, which he composes and records himself using Native Instruments and vintage synths.

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“Most everything starts with a piano idea, and as I get a certain progression or vibe, piano and strings are where I usually start,” says Palazzo. “There’s these moments where there’s a lot of flutes riffing in the background that has a real ’70s vibe to it that I liked. Also, in the beginning, I went with this beat bassline thing with a Fender Rhodes, just to set the city vibe.”

Our Thing with Sammy the BullElements of Palazzo’s original score pop up in various moments throughout the podcast, including a piece he wrote for the finale that is now the signature opening and closing music for each episode of the podcast.

“They wanted a big orchestral thing—a big, sort of swelling finale,” he says. “If someone gives me a reference, I’ll check out the reference and I’ll listen, and as soon as I get into the vibe of it, I’m almost immediately off onto my own tangent. And then it becomes its own thing, which is what happened with that.”

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Dome Productions Rolls Out Gateway OB Truck

Gateway, a new all-IP SMPTE 2110 OB truck
Gateway, a new all-IP SMPTE 2110 OB truck

Canada (March 24, 2021)—Canada-based Dome Productions has unveiled Gateway, a new all-IP SMPTE 2110 OB truck outfitted with a Calrec Apollo digital audio console that is currently being used for TSN and Rogers SportsNet on their hockey broadcasts.

“We’re excited to take advantage of optimized and new workflows in all formats — HD, 3G and UHD. Now, virtual paths can be dynamically connected to change workflows depending on the show requirements,” said Al Karloff, manager of engineering services, Dome Productions.

Dome has been using Calrec consoles for 20 years and all different generations of the consoles are still active in the company’s fleet. The Apollo was commissioned by Canada-based SC Media.

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Jean Daoust, SC Media founder and president, says, “The Apollo was the only console that met Dome’s requirements; no other model could offer a surface with 144 faders, or the mix power of over 1,000 input channels. We’re proud to be partnered with companies such as Calrec and Dome Productions. The newfound addition of Calrec to our AV portfolio has opened new doors for us in the broadcast media vertical, as well as provided incredibly innovative solutions to our already valued customers. The Gateway truck is an incredible project, and we look forward to building upon this success for all parties involved.”

Calrec • www.calrec.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Rivera Talks Collaboration for Composing ‘Queen’s Gambit’

Carlos Rafael Rivera
Composer Carlos Rafael Rivera collaborated extensively with writer and director Scott Frank for “The Queen’s Gambit.”

Miami, FL—Award-winning composer Carlos Rafael Rivera’s favorite sequence in writer and director Scott Frank’s The Queen’s Gambit has nothing to do with any music that he wrote. Rather, it was an example of the collaborative process that begins when he first reads the screenplay.

“The way I work with Scott is very unorthodox,” Rivera told the audience during a recent PMA Academy webcast. “I work with him from the screenplay. I start writing music reacting to it.

”Frank had already written Minority Report and Get Shorty when Rivera started giving him guitar lessons. Frank was studying composition at USC’s Thornton School, where he was mentored by Randy Newman. Eventually they started working together, first on 2014’s A Walk Among the Tombstones, then on Netflix’s 2017 series Godless, for which Rivera won an Emmy Award for the main titles theme music.

“I make an iMovie out of the screenplay, then I score that,” said Rivera of his creative process. “What I’ve learned in being involved with the process early on is that 30 percent of the music survives. The rest goes away, because it doesn’t work.”

"The Queen's Gambit" album art
Listen to Rivera’s score for “The Queen’s Gambit.”

His favorite sequence in The Queen’s Gambit, he said, is the end of episode 1, where the 1953 film The Robe is playing in the background. “I thought of having this movie being heard in the background, and the score in the background becomes diegetic—it informs the action. I was able to suggest something the director liked so much that he shot it with the idea of syncing it to Alfred Newman’s score.”

When writing his own scores, Rivera uses Native Instruments’ Kontakt and Komplete, he said, but he has also been using Spitfire Audio libraries such as Albion Tundra. “It helped me on Godless,” he said.

Some composers buy lots of libraries. “I get one thing—because until recently I couldn’t afford these things—and work my way through it,” said Rivera, whose day job is teaching at the Frost School of Music at the University of Miami. “I like the idea of consuming one library and then moving on to another.”

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Supervising sound editor and sound designer Wylie Stateman discusses his work on The Queen’s Gambit
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But he always incorporates a few live musicians to “sell” his demos, he said. “I record them and blend them with the libraries.” The idea is to ultimately record the score with an orchestra in Budapest, Hungary. For The Queen’s Gambit, he said, “The session dates started the day after Hungary lifted the quarantine on musicians. We were very lucky. But we were prepared to have it in-the-box.”

Carlos Rafael Rivera • www.carlosrafaelrivera.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

True Crime Sound Design on ‘Anatomy of Murder’

Dayton Cole, handles all the post-production work on Anatomy of Murder using a variety of tools, including Avid Pro Tools, a Universal Audio Apollo Twin X interface, plug-ins on an adjacent screen like Waves’ WLM Loudness Meter, and a pair of Audeze LCD-2 Classic Open-Back Over-Ear Headphones.
Dayton Cole, handles all the post-production work on Anatomy of Murder using a variety of tools, including Avid Pro Tools, a Universal Audio Apollo Twin X interface, plug-ins on an adjacent screen like Waves’ WLM Loudness Meter, and a pair of Audeze LCD-2 Classic Open-Back Over-Ear Headphones. LEAF & PINE PHOTOGRAPHY | www.leafandpine.com
Anatomy of Murder executive producer Sumit David.
Anatomy of Murder executive producer Sumit David.

Indianapolis, IN (March 18, 2021)—True-crime podcasts, by the nature of the stories they tell, tend to be underlaid with tense and ominous sounds. While each episode of the Anatomy of Murder podcast, produced by Indianapolis, IN-based Audiochuck, deals with dark themes and details, there is also plenty of room for light, says executive producer Sumit David.

“If you look at the color palettes of a Star Wars movie, they always [begin] white and bright, and as the movie progresses, it gets darker,” says David. “[We were] like, ‘That’s how we should approach the sound design of this. Let’s start not so true crime. Let’s not start very heavy. Let’s ease our audience into it.’”

Dayton Cole, who handles all the post-production work on Anatomy of Murder at podcast editing service Resonate Recordings (Lousiville, KY), likens the process to building a house, with the brooding sounds serving as the basement. Once they establish that baseline, Cole attends to the “brighter, sentimental moments,” which are his favorite to highlight. “More natural sounds, strings and piano—those kind of natural elements—rather than the synthetic, electronic pulsing and droning,” he says.

Anatomy of Murder's hosts Anna-Sigga Nicolazzi, an NYC homicide prosecutor, and Scott Weinberger, an investigative journalist.
Anatomy of Murder’s hosts Anna-Sigga Nicolazzi, an NYC homicide prosecutor, and Scott Weinberger, an investigative journalist.

David’s background as an editor on reality television programs prepared him for his role on Anatomy of Murder, which is also unscripted. Hosts Anna-Sigga Nicolazzi, an NYC homicide prosecutor, and Scott Weinberger, an investigative journalist, research the cases and keep a loose set of talking points for each episode, but otherwise the interviews and case discussions are fluid. The pair record on Blue Yeti USB microphones, while guests record locally on their own computers during video conferences with the hosts.

Before the audio files make it to Cole as an OMF, an open-source format that allows him to import David’s Adobe Premiere files into Pro Tools, David edits the interviews and compiles related archival audio collected from law enforcement sources.

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“I try and make it so that the story is all laid out, that all the bites, whether they be from Scott, Anna-Sigga, from the guests, or from archival material, are all put together in one big sequence, divided up into the four acts,” says David. “From there, it’s handed off to Dayton so he can do his magic of adding the sound design, pacing [and] music.”

David provides some creative direction, but after working together on dozens of episodes of the podcast, the pair have a largely unspoken workflow. Cole approaches each episode as a listener would, forming an outsider’s perspective on the structure and recordings David sends him. “I create blank tracks—little ‘slugs’ I call them—so I can just say, ‘This is kind of the emotion I want in this section,’” says Cole.

Many of the sounds Cole weaves into the podcast’s aural environment come from sound libraries, although he often manipulates the stems through processors like iZotope Rx to meet his needs. The main concern is to keep the music from distracting listeners away from the dialogue, so it is impactful but not overpowering. On a recent episode where he didn’t have access to stem tracks, he improvised to keep the bass and kick drum from overpowering the other instruments.

“I liked what all the other elements were doing,” so “I used the Elysia Alpha Compressor to be able to help the mids come back, and then open up the sides,” he says. “And, I was able to kind of blend that underneath so it wasn’t hitting you in the face so much.”

Transparency is key at the end of the day. Cole prefers to remain in the background and work without being detected. “My job is, don’t be noticed, but be impactful,” he says. “If people are in the story and they’re digging it and they don’t notice all the sound changes, that’s when I know I’ve done my job.”

Anatomy of Murder • https://anatomyofmurder.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Mixing X Factor Colombia

Freelance audio engineer Richard Cardenas handled live mixing duties for the show inside RCN Televisión’s studios in Bogotá.
Freelance audio engineer Richard Cardenas handled live mixing duties for X Factor Colombia inside RCN Televisión’s studios in Bogotá. EL_CHAMO

Bogotá, Columbia (March 10, 2021)—Like many TV shows, X Factor Colombia 2020 was interrupted by the pandemic last spring, part way into production. The show resumed after eight months, however, returning last October with strict precautions in place that ran throughout the rest of the season, which wrapped up at the end of the year. Throughout it all, freelance audio engineer Richard Cardenas handled live mixing duties for the show inside RCN Televisión’s studios in Bogotá.

Cardenas opted for an Allen & Heath dLive mixing system on the show, centered around a CDM48 MixRack controlled from a 36-fader S7000 surface. He managed all the contestants’ IEM mixes, plus FOH and monitor mixes for the contestants, judges and audience. The audio configuration in the studio consisted of an LR stereo matrix out, a matrix mono sub out, stereo aux mixes feeding side fills, a mono floor wedge setup and a stereo aux mix for the judges’ side-fill. For the earlier recordings, an audience PA mix was also fed to a stereo matrix. A DX012 12-output expander was employed to provide additional AES feeds to a 96 kHz loudspeaker management system. Cardenas also used a Dante 64×64 card to feed the broadcast desk using dLive’s tie lines feature, plus a superMADI card for backup recording to a Pixel Power system.

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Cardenas first encountered the system at a festival in 2019, where he mixed multiple Latin Grammy winners a few months before being approached to work on the TV show. “With dLive, I really felt like I was mixing rather than trying to figure out how to operate the desk,” he said, “so when I had the opportunity to work on X Factor Colombia, I asked RCN Television for a dLive system. We only had two weeks between delivery and rehearsals, but I had excellent support from Allen & Heath’s specialist in Colombia, Ivan Sanchez.”

All that allowed Cardenas to streamline his system for the broadcasts: “The DEEP processing emulations are excellent and sound very close to the real thing. The same goes for the FX. The EQs and preamps also sound excellent and dLive’s very low latency and 96kHz processing set it apart from the rest.”

Allen & Heath • www.allen-heath.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

After 500 Episodes, ‘Grumpy Old Geeks’ Has a Slick Audio Workflow

grumpy old geeksNew York, NY (March 4, 2021)—The first big lesson Jason DeFillippo learned about podcasting was a crucial one. When he and Brian Schulmeister started Grumpy Old Geeks tech podcast eight years ago, they were running two USB microphones on a glass desktop, in a hardwood-floored room, underneath an airport runway. It’s difficult to imagine a more unforgiving audio environment.

“If you go back and listen to the first episodes, it was right on the flight path to Santa Monica airport in Venice [Calif.],” laughs co-host and producer DeFillippo. “[In] the first 20 episodes or so, there’s a plane every five minutes.”

Jason DeFillippo, co-host and producer of Grumpy Old Geeks.

DeFillippo’s perfectionism and growing experience as a producer of professional podcasts like The Art of Charm, Foodist and The Jordan Harbinger Show helped accelerate his hobby podcast’s production values. These days, after nearly 500 episodes and millions of downloads, Grumpy Old Geeks has evolved into a force all its own.

“All of this stuff that I’m doing also translated to Grumpy Old Geeks,” he says. “Actually, a lot of times, I would experiment on Grumpy Old Geeks because nobody was listening to that show. We could get away with doing crazy experiments to see if they worked before we took them over to a show that anybody was actually listening to.”

His quest to make the podcast sound as smooth as radio coincided with the decision to begin recording remotely. After upgrading to a Universal Audio Apollo Twin interface, Electro-Voice RE27N/D broadcasting mic and Rode PSA-1 boom, now he carries a pack with him all over the U.S. and maintains consistent audio quality with an Electro-Voice RE20 dynamic microphone, Sound Devices MixPre-6 preamp audio recorder and his secret weapon: a PreSonus Studio 192 interface.

“You can do all sorts of crazy cable routing with it, and I still use it to this day,” he says. “It’s sitting on my desk in a [double rack unit] with a Furman power conditioner so I can pick it up and take it anywhere in the world, like a little briefcase. I’ve actually got two of them because if one ever broke, I’d be out of business.”

While DeFillippo previously used Skype to connect with Schulmeister and guests—through a three-computer setup of one iMac and two Mac Minis, one for each Skype feed—he switched to the Zencastr platform. “Once Zencastr came out and it got somewhat decent, we switched over to that full-time and got rid of Skype altogether,” he says. “I haven’t used Skype for a podcast in years at this point.”

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In their latest pivot, Grumpy Old Geeks has begun using Squadcast as well as Riverside to record audio for the podcast. The latter platform also records 4k video, which DeFillippo’s other podcast clients use to publish content to YouTube. “Riverside and Squadcast are so great because everybody’s got a browser, everybody’s got a laptop nowadays,” he says. “If you have headphones and a MacBook Pro, I can make that sound like you’re in a studio.”

There is another key benefit, particularly for DeFillippo’s outside clients: Riverside has a Co-Producer mode that allows him to set up clients and then login as a non-participating attendee. He can be “in the room” and communicate with the host and guests, but not be seen or recorded.

Still, one area remains off-limits in DeFillippo’s dedication to high-quality production values: Phone audio is not allowed.

“We’ll just reschedule the show if we have to go to a phone,” he says. “It’s just one of the conditions of any of the shows I work on: We don’t use phones. We want everything to sound like it’s in a studio. If we have to send you a mic, we’ll send you a mic and headphones. The people I usually work with, they want the best quality that you can get.”

Grumpy Old Geekshttps://gog.show

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Cinema Audio Society Announces Award Nominations

Cinema Audio SocietyLos Angeles, CA (March 3, 2021)—The Cinema Audio Society has announced its nominees for the 56th Annual CAS Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Sound Mixing for 2020 in seven categories, as well as the Outstanding Product Nominations.

“2020 was wrought with unprecedented challenges, yet the nominees of the 57th Annual CAS Awards display a stellar example of quality and creativity that rivals any of our previous years. This year’s celebration is a testament to the outstanding technical ingenuity and creative prowess of our sound mixing community,” said CAS president Karol Urban.

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The nominations for the 57th CAS Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Sound Mixing for 2020 are:

 

Motion Pictures – Live Action

Greyhound

Production Mixer – David Wyman CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Michael Minkler CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Christian Minkler CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Richard Kitting

Re-Recording Mixer – Beau Borders CAS

Scoring Mixer – Greg Hayes

Foley Mixer – George A. Lara CAS

 

Mank

Production Mixer – Drew Kunin

Re-Recording Mixer – Ren Klyce

Re-Recording Mixer – David Parker

Re-Recording Mixer – Nathan Nance

Scoring Mixer – Alan Meyerson CAS

ADR Mixer – Charleen Richards-Steeves

Foley Mixer – Scott Curtis

 

News of the World

Production Mixer – John Patrick Pritchett CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Mike Prestwood Smith

Re-Recording Mixer – William Miller

Scoring Mixer – Shawn Murphy

ADR Mixer – Mark DeSimone CAS

Foley Mixer – Adam Fil Méndez CAS

 

Sound of Metal

Production Mixer – Phillip Bladh CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Nicolas Becker

Re-Recording Mixer – Jaime Baksht

Re-Recording Mixer – Michelle Couttolenc

ADR Mixer – Carlos Cortez Navarrette

Foley Mixer – Kari Vähäkuopus

 

The Trial of the Chicago 7

Production Mixer – Thomas Varga CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Julian Slater CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Michael Babcock CAS

Scoring Mixer – Daniel Pemberton

ADR Mixer – Justin W. Walker

Foley Mixer – Kevin Schultz

 

Motion Pictures – Animated

A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon

Dialogue & ADR Mixer – Dom Boucher

Re-Recording Mixer – Chris Burdon

Re-Recording Mixer – Gilbert Lake

Re-Recording Mixer – Adrian Rhodes

Scoring Mixer – Alan Meyerson CAS

Foley Mixer – Ant Bayman

 

Onward

Original Dialogue Mixer – Vincent Caro CAS

Original Dialogue Mixer – Doc Kane CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Michael Semanick CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Juan Peralta

Scoring Mixer – Brad Haehnel

Foley Mixer – Scott Curtis

 

Soul

Original Dialogue Mixer – Vincent Caro CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Ren Klyce

Re-Recording Mixer – David Parker

Scoring Mixer – Atticus Ross

Scoring Mixer – David Boucher CAS

ADR Mixer – Bobby Johanson CAS

Foley Mixer – Scott Curtis

 

The Croods: A New Age

Original Dialogue Mixer – Tighe Sheldon

Re-Recording Mixer – Christopher Scarabosio CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Leff Lefferts

Scoring Mixer – Alan Meyerson CAS

Foley Mixer – Richard Duarte

Foley Mixer – Scott Curtis

 

Trolls World Tour

Original Dialogue Mixer – Tighe Sheldon

Re-Recording Mixer – Scott Millan CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Paul Hackner

Scoring Mixer – Christopher Fogel CAS

Foley Mixer – Randy K. Singer CAS

 

Motion Pictures – Documentary

David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet

Re-Recording Mixer – Graham Wild

Scoring Mixer – Gareth Cousins CAS

 

My Octopus Teacher

Re-Recording Mixer – Barry Donnelly

Foley Mixer – Charl Mostert

 

The Bee Gees: How Can You Mend A Broken Heart

Re-Recording Mixer – Gary A. Rizzo CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Jeff King

 

The Social Dilemma

Production Mixer – Mark A. Crawford

Re-Recording Mixer – Scott R. Lewis

Scoring Mixer – Mark Venezia

Foley Mixer – Jason Butler

 

Zappa

Production Mixer – Monty Buckles

Re-Recording Mixer – Marty Zub CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Lon Bender

 

Non-Theatrical Motion Picture or Limited Series

American Horror Story: 1984 Ep. 9 “Final Girl”

Production Mixer – Alex Altman

Re-Recording Mixer – Joe Earle CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Doug Andham CAS

ADR Mixer – Judah Getz CAS

Foley Mixer – Jacob McNaughton

 

Fargo: Ep. 7 “East/West”

Production Mixer – J.T. Mueller CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Jeffrey Perkins

Re-Recording Mixer – Josh Eckberg

Scoring Mixer – Michael Perfitt

ADR Mixer – Matt Hovland

Foley Mixer – Randy Wilson

 

Lovecraft Country: Ep. 1 “Sundown”

Production Mixer – Amanda Beggs CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Marc Fishman CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Mathew Waters CAS

Scoring Mixer – Brad Hacknell

ADR Mixer – Miguel Araujo

Foley Mixer – Brett Voss CAS

 

The Queen’s Gambit: Ep. 4 “Middle Game”

Production Mixer – Roland Winke

Re-Recording Mixer – Eric Hoehn CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Eric Hirsch

Re-Recording Mixer – Leo Marcil

Scoring Mixer – Lawrence Manchester

 

Watchmen: Ep. 6 “This Extraordinary Being”

Production Mixer – Doug Axtell

Re-Recording Mixer – Joseph DeAngelis CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Chris Carpenter

Scoring Mixer – Atticus Ross

ADR Mixer – Judah Getz CAS

Foley Mixer – Antony Zeller CAS

 

Television Series – 1 Hour

Better Call Saul: Ep. 8 “Bagman”

Production Mixer – Phillip W. Palmer CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Larry B. Benjamin CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Kevin Valentine

ADR Mixer – Chris Navarro CAS

Foley Mixer – Stacey Michaels CAS

 

Ozark: Ep. 10 “All In”

Production Mixer – Filipe Borrero CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Larry B. Benjamin CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Kevin Valentine

Scoring Mixer – Phil McGowan CAS

ADR Mixer – Chris Navarro CAS

Foley Mixer – Amy Barber

 

The Crown: S4, Ep. 1 “Gold Stick”

Production Mixer – Chris Ashworth

Re-Recording Mixer – Lee Walpole

Re-Recording Mixer – Stuart Hilliker CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Martin Jensen

ADR Mixer – Gibran Farrah

Foley Mixer – Catherine Thomas

 

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel: S3, Ep. 8 “A Jewish Girl Walks Into the Apollo…”

Production Mixer – Mathew Price CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Ron Bochar CAS

Scoring Mixer – Stewart Lerman

ADR Mixer – David Boulton

Foley Mixer – George A. Lara CAS

 

Westworld: S3, Ep. 4 “The Mother of Exiles”

Production Mixer – Geoffrey Patterson CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Keith A. Rogers CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Benjamin L. Cook

Scoring Mixer – Ramin Djawadi

 

Television Series – 1/2 Hour

Dead to Me: Ep. 201 “You Know What You Did”

Production Mixer – Steven Michael Morantz CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Brad Sherman CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Alexander Gruzdev

ADR Mixer – Jason Oliver

 

Modern Family: Ep.1118 “Finale Part 1”

Production Mixer – Stephen A. Tibbo CAS

Production Mixer – Srdjan Popovic

Re-Recording Mixer – Dean Okrand CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Brian Harman CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Peter Bawiec

ADR MIXER – Matt Hovland

Foley Mixer – David Michael Torres CAS

 

Ted Lasso: Ep. 110 “The Hope that Kills You”

Production Mixer – David Lascelles AMPS

Re-Recording Mixer – Ryan Kennedy

Re-Recording Mixer – Sean Byrne

ADR Mixer – Brent Findley

ADR Mixer – Marilyn Morris

Scoring Mixer – George Murphy

Foley Mixer – Jordan McClain

 

The Mandalorian: Ep. 102 “Chapter 2: The Child”

Production Mixer – Shawn Holden CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Bonnie Wild

Re-Recording Mixer – Stephen Urata

Scoring Mixer – Christopher Fogel CAS

ADR Mixer – Matthew Wood

Foley Mixer – Blake Collins CAS

 

The Mandalorian: Ep. 205 “Chapter 13: The Jedi”

Production Mixer – Shawn Holden CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Stephen Urata

Re-Recording Mixer – Bonnie Wild

Scoring Mixer – Christopher Fogel CAS

ADR Mixer – Matthew Wood

Foley Mixer – Jason Butler

 

Television Non-Fiction, Variety or Music – Series or Specials

Beastie Boys Story

Production Mixer – Jacob Feinberg

Production Mixer – William Tzouris

Re-Recording Mixer – Martyn Zub CAS

 

Bruce Springsteen’s Letter to You

Production Mixer – Brad Bergbom

Re-Recording Mixer – Kevin O’Connell CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Kyle Arzt

Music Mixer – Bob Clearmountain

 

Hamilton

Production Mixer – Justin Rathbun

Re-Recording Mixer – Tony Volante

Re-Recording Mixer – Rob Fernandez

Re-Recording Mixer – Tim Latham

 

Laurel Canyon: A Place in Time Ep. 1

Re-Recording Mixer – Gary A. Rizzo CAS

Re-Recording Mixer – Stephen Urata

Re-Recording Mixer – Danielle Dupre

Re-Recording Mixer – Tony Villaflor

Scoring Mixer – Dave Lynch

 

NASA & SpaceX: Journey to The Future

Production Mixer – Erik Clabeaux

Re-Recording Mixer – Michael Keeley CAS

 

Outstanding Product Production

DPA Microphones, Inc. DPA 4097 CORE Micro Shotgun Mic

Lectrosonics, Inc. DCR822 Dual Channel Digital Audio Receiver

Shure Incorporated Axient AD3

Sound Devices, LLC CL-16 Linear Fader Control Surface for 8-Series

Sound Devices, LLC Sound Devices Noise Assist

 

Outstanding Product Post Production

Evercast, LLC. Evercast

Focusrite PLC RedNet R1

iZotope, Inc. RX8

The Cargo Cult Matchbox

Todd-AO Actors Mobile ADR

Previously announced honorees are George Clooney as CAS filmmaker and production sound mixer William B. Kaplan CAS as CAS Career Achievement Honoree. The Student Recognition Award winner will also be named.

The Awards will be presented at a sealed envelope virtual event on April 17.  On the evening of the Awards the Cinema Audio Society website will be updated in real time as the winners are announced.

Cinema Audio Society • www.cinemaaudiosociety.org

 

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Top Cinema Sound Teams Talk Up Audio Efforts

On Mank, the sound crew was tasked with reviving the feel of the Golden Age of Hollywood in the track, and came up with a process of combining old and new technologies to create a “patina” for playback.
On Mank, the sound crew was tasked with reviving the feel of the Golden Age of Hollywood in the track, and came up with a process of combining old and new technologies to create a “patina” for playback.

Hollywood, CA (March 3, 2021)—To celebrate Hollywood’s annual awards season, Mix Magazine recently hosted Mix Sound for Film & TV Awards Season, an all-day online event of panels with the sound teams behind some of 2020’s likely contenders in advance of the Oscar, Motion Picture Sound Editors and Cinema Audio Society Award nomination announcements.

Netflix’s Mank, about Citizen Kane screenwriter Herman Mankiewicz, has already picked up a handful of Golden Globe nominations, including for the score by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross. Director David Fincher’s reported wish was for his film’s soundtrack to share the sound character of Citizen Kane—and be mono. The sound crew reported that they followed a three-step process, first mixing the picture in full resolution then adding “patina”—replicating the character of Golden Age films—before playing the soundtrack on the Skywalker scoring stage, with its 3.2-second RT, and re-recording through a variety of mic setups. Sound designer Ren Klyce dubbed the final result “monorama.”

Amazon’s Sound of Metal is about a hardcore band drummer who begins to lose his hearing. Mucht of the soundtrack offers the sonic point of view of the drummer, played by Riz Ahmed, a Golden Globe nominee, which offered the team plenty of scope for creativity. For a dinnertime scene featuring other hearing loss sufferers, the character’s near-silent POV is juxtaposed with the clatter in the room. “We planted mics under tables and contact mics on surfaces. The sounds of plates and the table itself was done by the actors; we did our best to capture it,” said production sound mixer Philip Bladh.

Mix Sound For Film Event a Virtual Hit

George Clooney, who directed and stars in Netflix’s post-apocalyptic feature The Midnight Sky, mentioned to Randy Thom, the project’s director of sound design, that he was a fan of The Revenant, on which Thom also worked. There are some parallels, said Thom, “so I had that in the back of my head as I was figuring out which sounds would be appropriate and how to process them.” The team generated 27 versions, in 27 different formats, including a Dolby Atmos theatrical mix and the full complement of Netflix requirements, they reported.

“We started the week that we had to shut down for COVID,” said Rich Bologna, supervising sound editor on Judas and the Black Messiah, about the death of Black Panther Party leader Fred Hampton, “so we all worked remotely.” A key scene at which Hampton addresses a church rally of 350 people was “a testament to production sound,” he said, with a nod to the location sound work of Marlowe Taylor. “We just hammered through it and all of a sudden, it felt like you were in the room.” Veteran re-recording mixer Skip Lievsay agreed: “It was a dream scene.”

Hulu’s Golden Globe-nominated The United States vs. Billie Holiday focuses on the famed jazz singer’s run-ins with the FBI in the early days of the war on drugs. “It’s an amazing performance,” said re-recording mixer Josh Berger of singer Andra Day in her first major role. “The dialog was the action…so we really had to be careful how we added sound into those scenes,” said re-recording mixer and supervising sound editor Bob Hein. “It’s almost like seeing some kind of an action film, emotionally.”

Wonder Woman 1984, one of the rare films to have enjoyed a theatrical release this past year, presented some challenges, according to production sound mixer Peter Devlin. One scene was shot near the White House, where construction work threatened to ruin the location sound, but re-recording mixers Gary Rizzo and Gilbert Lake saved the day. “I couldn’t hear any jackhammers,” said Devlin of the final mix.

Entertainment company Deluxe presented an overview of its One Dub solution, which eliminates the need for post-editing when recording remote group ADR and walla. Every participant receives synchronized video from the audio engineer, who controls the session. Picture is overlaid with the script, which updates for everyone if there are changes. After recording, multiple subscribers can edit different dialog tracks within the session, if necessary. “It’s one of those tools that will go forward even after COVID,” said supervising sound editor Mandell Winter.

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

MPSE Announces Golden Reel Award Nominees

 

Studio City, CA (March 1, 2021)—The Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE) has named nominees for its 68th Annual MPSE Golden Reel Awards, highlighting the work of talented sound artists and their contributions in 22 categories covering feature film, television, animation, computer entertainment and student productions.

As is the case with most award events this year, the Golden Reel Awards will be presented as an international virtual event, taking place Sunday, April 16, 2021 at 6:00pm. While this year’s Career Achievement Award winner has yet to be announced, the organization will honor George Miller with its annual Filmmaker Award. Tickets to the event can be purchased at the mpse.org website.

And the nominees are…

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Feature Animation

The Croods: A New Age

DreamWorks

Supervising Sound Editors: Brian Chumney, Leff Lefferts

Sound Designer: Randy Thom, MPSE

Supervising Music Editor: Dominick Certo, MPSE

Dialogue Editor: Jonathan Greber

Sound Effects Editors: Pascal Garneau, Mac Smith

Foley Editors: Doug Winningham, Dee Selby

Foley Artists: John Roesch, MPSE; Shelley Roden, MPSE; Ronni Brown, Jana Vance

 

Onward

Disney / Pixar

Supervising Sound Editor: Shannon Mills

Sound Designer: Nia Hansen

Sound Effects Editors: Samson Neslund, Kimberly Patrick, David C. Hughes, Josh Gold

Supervising Dialogue Editor: Chris Gridley

Foley Editors: Christopher Flick, Steve Orlando

Foley Artists: John Roesch, MPSE; Shelley Roden, MPSE

Music Editor: Erich Stratmann

 

Over the Moon

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editors: Qianbaihui Yang, MPSE; Jeremy Bowker

Dialogue Editors: James Spencer, Brad Semenoff

Foley Editors: Dee Selby, Chris Frazier, Larry Oatfield, Alyssa Nevarez

Foley Artists: Ronni Brown, Jana Vance

Music Editor: Bradley Farmer

 

Soul

Disney

Supervising Sound Editor: Coya Elliott

Sound Effects Editors: Kimberly Patrick, Steve Orlando, Jonathan Stevens

Supervising Dialogue Editor: Cheryl Nardi

Sound Designer: Ren Klyce

Foley Editor Thom Brennan

Foley Artists: John Roesch, MPSE; Shelley Roden, MPSE; Dee Selby

 

Wolfwalkers

Apple Tv+

Supervising Sound Editors: Christine Seznec, Sebastien Marquilly, Bruno Seznec

Sound Effects Editors: Baptiste Bouche, Felix Davin, Alexandre Fleurant, Axel Steichen

Dialogue Editor: Anne-Lyse Haddak

Foley Editor: Stéphane Werner

Foley Artist: Florian Fabre

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Feature Documentary

Bee Gees: How Can You Mend a Broken Heart

HBO Documentary Films

Supervising Sound Editor: Jonathan Greber

Sound Effects Editor: Pascal Garneau

 

Crip Camp

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Jacob Bloomfield-Misrach

Dialogue Editor: Greg Francis

Sound Designers: Bijan Sharifi, William Sammons, James LeBrecht

 

John Lewis: Good Trouble

Magnolia Pictures

Sound Effects Editor: Richard Gould

Sound Designer: Christopher Barnett

 

My Octopus Teacher

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Barry Donnelly

Foley Artist: Charl Mostert

 

The Reason I Jump

Vulcan Productions

Sound Effects Editors: Laurence Love Greed, Alexej Mungersdorff, Jack Wensley

Dialogue Editor: Jamie McPhee

Foley Editor: Srdjan Kurpjel

 

Rebuilding Paradise

National Geographic

Sound Effects Editors: David Hughes, Richard Gould

Sound Designer: Christopher Barnett

 

The Social Dilemma

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Richard Gould

Dialogue Editor: James Spencer

Foley Artist: Andrea Gard

 

Zappa

Magnolia Pictures

Supervising Sound Editor: Lon Bender, MPSE

Dialogue Editors: Ryan Owens, George Anderson, Nick Pavey

Sound Effects Editors: Alex Nomick, P. Daniel Newman, Chris Kahwaty, MPSE

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Foreign Language Feature

Bacurau

Globo Filmes

Supervising Sound Editor: Ricardo Cutz Gaudenzi

Dialogue Editor: Victor Quintanilha

Sound Effects Editor: Matheus Miguens

Foley Editor: Rafael Faustino

Foley Artist: Pedro Coelho

 

The Eight Hundred

CMC Pictures

Supervising Sound Designer and Editor: Kang Fu

Sound Effects Editor: Steve Miller

Dialogue Editor: Ai Long Tan

Music Editor: Fei Yu

 

I’m No Longer Here

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Javier Umpierrez

Dialogue Editor: Juan Sosa Rosell

Foley Editor: Lía Perez

Foley Artist: Marisela Suárez

Music Editor: Javier Umpierrez

 

Jallikattu

Opus Penta

Supervising Sound Editor: Ranganath Ravee

Sound Effects Editors: Sreejith Sreenivasan, Boney M. Joy, Arun Rama Varma, MPSE

Foley Artists: Amandeep Singh, Mohammad Iqbal Paratwada

 

The Life Ahead

Netflix

Supervising Sound Designer and Editor: Maurizio Argentieri

Dialogue Editor: Riccardo Righini

Foley Artist: Mauro Eusepi

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Feature Underscore

The Invisible Man

Universal Pictures

Supervising Music Editor: Brett “Snacky” Pierce

Music Editor: Devaughn Watts

 

The Midnight Sky

Netflix

Supervising Music Editor: Michael Alexander

Scoring Editor: Peter Clarke, MPSE

 

News of the World

Universal Pictures

Supervising Music Editor: Arabella Winter

Music Editors: David Olson, Jim Weidman

 

Sound of Metal

Amazon

Supervising Music Editor: Carolina Santana

Scoring Editors: Nicolas Becker, Abraham Marder

 

Tenet

Warner Bros.

Supervising Music Editor: Alex Gibson

Music Editor: Nicholas Fitzgerald

 

The Trial of the Chicago 7

Netflix

Music Editor: Allegra de Souza

 

Wonder Woman 84

Warner Bros.

Supervising Music Editors: Gerard McCann, Ryan Rubin

Music Editors: Timeri Duplat, Michael Connell

Scoring Editors: Chris Barrett, Adam Miller, Alfredo Pasquel

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Feature Musical

Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of the Fire Saga

Netflix

Music Editors: Allegra De Souza, Peter Oso Snell, MPSE; Jon Mooney

 

The High Note

Focus Features

Music Editor: Louis Schultz

 

I Am Woman

Transmission Films

Supervising Music Editor: Stuart Morton, MPSE

Music Editors: Bry Jones, Michael Tan

 

The Forty-Year-Old Version

Netflix

Music Editor: Lightchild

 

Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom

Netflix

Supervising Music Editor: Todd Kasow

Music Editor: Tim Marchiafava

 

The Prom

Netflix

Music Editors: David Klotz, Nick Baxter

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Feature Dialogue / ADR

Emperor

Sobini Films

Supervising Sound Editors: Glenn Morgan, D. Chris Smith

Dialogue Editors: Robert Jackson

 

Greyhound

Apple+

Supervising Sound Editors: Michael Minkler, Warren Shaw, Will Digby, MPSE

Supervising ADR Editor: Dave McMoyler

Dialogue Editors: Michelle Pazer, David Tichauer, Paul Carden

 

Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editors: Paul Urmson, Skip Lievsay, MPSE

Supervising ADR Editor: Lidia Tamplenizza

Dialogue Editors: Michael Feuser

 

Mank

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editors: Ren Klyce, Jeremy Molod

Supervising ADR Editor: Richard Quinn

Dialogue Editors: Kim Foscato, Lisa Chino, Cameron Barker

 

News of the World

Universal Pictures

Supervising Sound Editor: Oliver Tarney, MPSE

Supervising Dialogue Editor: Rachael Tate, MPSE

Supervising ADR Editor: Anna MacKenzie

 

Nomadland

Searchlight Pictures

Supervising Sound Editors: Sergio Diaz, MPSE; Zach Seivers, MPSE

 

Sound of Metal

Amazon

Supervising Sound Editor: Nicolas Becker

Supervising ADR Editor: Carolina Santana

Dialogue Editor: Michelle Couttolenc

 

Trial of the Chicago 7

Netflix

Supervising Sound and ADR Editor: Renee Tondelli

Dialogue Editors: Michael Hertlein, MPSE; Jeena Schoenke, Jon Michaels

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Feature Effects / Foley

Cherry

Apple TV+

Supervising Sound Editor: Mark Binder, MPSE

Sound Effects Editors: Donald Flick, Michael Gilbert, Matthew Coby

 

Greyhound

Apple TV+

Supervising Sound Editors: Warren Shaw, Michael Minkler, Will Digby, MPSE

Sound Designers: Ann Scibelli, Jon Title

Sound Effects Editors: Jeff Sawyer, Richard Kitting, Odin Benitez, MPSE; Jason King

Foley Editor: Luke Gibleon

Foley Artist: Marko Costanzo

 

The Midnight Sky

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editors: Bjørn Schroeder, Randy Thom

Sound Designer: Kyrsten Mate

Sound Effects Editor: Leff Lefferts

Foley Editor: Nicholas Docter

Foley Artists: John Roesch, Shelley Roden

 

News of the World

Universal Pictures

Supervising Sound Editor: Oliver Tarney

Sound Designer: Mike Fentum

Sound Effects Editors: Kevin Penney, Dawn Gough

Foley Editor: Hugo Adams

Foley Artists: Sue Harding, Andrea King, Oliver Ferris

 

Sound of Metal

Amazon

Supervising Sound Editor: Nicolas Becker

Sound Effects Editor: Carolina Santana

Foley Editor: Pietu Korhonen

Foley Artist: Heikke Kossi

 

Tenet

Warner Bros.

Supervising Sound Editor: Richard King

Sound Effects Editors: Michael W. Mitchell, Joseph Fraioli, Mark Larry

Foley Editors: Bruce Tanis, MPSE; Angela Ang

Foley Artists: Catherine Harper, MPSE; John Roesch, MPSE; Katie Rose, Alyson Dee Moore, Chris Moriana, Shelley Roden, MPSE; Dan O’Connell, John Cucci, MPSE

 

Wonder Woman 84

Warner Bros.

Supervising Sound Editor: Richard King, Jimmy Boyle

Sound Effects Editors: Rowan Watson, Michael Babcock, Jeff Sawyer

Foley Editors: Kevin Penney, Lily Blazewicz

Foley Artists: Peter Burgess, Zoe Freed

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Live Action Under 35:00

Brooklyn 99: “Lights Out”

NBC

Supervising Sound Editor: Danika Wikke, MPSE

Dialogue Editor: Joe Schiff

Sound Effects Editor: Mark Cookson

Foley Artists: Jonathan Bespoke, Ben Parker

Foley Editor: Julia Huberman

Music Editor: Tessa Phillips

 

Dead To Me: “If You Only Knew”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Walter Newman, MPSE

Supervising ADR Editor: Darleen Stoker

Sound Effects Editor: Ron Salalses

Music Editor: Amber Funk, MPSE

 

Homecoming: “Giant”

Amazon

Supervising Sound Editor: Kevin Buchholz

Music Editor: Ben Zales

Sound Effects Editor: Dan Kremer

Sound Designer: Daniel Colman, MPSE

Dialogue Editors: Polly McKinnon, Helen Luttrell

Foley Editor: Mike Marino

Foley Artists: Dominiquie Decaudain, Pam Kahn

 

I May Destroy You: “Eyes Eyes Eyes Eyes”

Warner Bros. Television

Supervising Sound Editor: Jim Goddard

Sound Designer: Joe Beal

Dialogue Editor: Tom Deane

Foley Editor: Alex Sidiropoulos

Foley Artist: Anna Wright

 

A Parks and Recreation Special

NBC Universal

Supervising Sound Editor: J. Brent Findley, MPSE

Music Editors: Jason Tregoe Newmann, Bryant J. Fuhrmann

Dialogue Editor: Michael Jesmer

 

Servant: “2:00”

Apple+

Supervising Sound Editor: Sean Garnhart

Sound Effects Editor: Mark Filip

Dialogue Editor: Michael Feuser

Music Editor: Lesley Langs

Foley Editors: Julien Pirrie, Gareth Rhys Jones

 

Space Force: “The Launch”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editors: Bobby Mackston, Paul Hammond

Sound Effects Editor: Sean Garnhart

Music Editor: Jason Tregoe Newman

Foley Artist: Vincent Guisetti

 

Ted Lasso: “The Hope That Kills You”

Apple TV+

Supervising Sound Editor: Brent Findley, MPSE

Sound Effects Editor: Kip Smedley

Dialogue Editor: Bernard Weiser, MPSE

Music Editors: Sharyn Gersh, Richard Brown

Foley Artists: Sanaa Kelley, Matt Talib

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Episodic Short Form – Music

The Alienist: “Belly of the Beast”

TNT

Supervising Music Editor: Ali Hawkins

 

Hollywood: “Hooray for Hollywood”

Netflix

Supervising Music Editor: David Klotz

 

Selena: The Series

Netflix

Music Editor: Max Cremona

 

Snowpiercer: “Trouble Comes Sideways”

Netflix

Music Editors: Michael Baber, Alex Heller

 

The Umbrella Academy: “Valhalla”

Netflix

Music Supervisor: Jen Malone

Music Editor: Lodge Worster

 

Vikings: “The Best Laid Plans”

Amazon

Supervising Music Editors: Yuri Gorbachow, MPSE; Mikaila Simmons

Music Editor: Lise Beauchesne

 

Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist: “Pilot”

NBC

Supervising Music Editor: Jaclyn Newman Dorn

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Episodic Short Form – Dialogue/ADR

Babylon Berlin – Season 3 – Episode 12

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Frank Kruse

Supervising ADR Editor: Benjamin Hörbe

Supervising Dialogue Editor: Alexander Buck

 

The Flight Attendant “Other People’s Houses”

HBO Max

Supervising Sound Editor: Mike Marchain

Dialogue Editors: Julie Altus, Vince Tennant, Doug Mountain

 

Locke & Key: “Crown of Shadows”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Dustin Harris, MPSE

Dialogue Editors: Jill Purdy, MPSE

 

Mandalorian S2: Chapter 13: The Jedi

Disney+

Supervising Sound Editors: Matthew Wood, David Acord

Dialogue Editor: Richard Quinn

ADR Editor: James Spencer

 

Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: “What We’re Fighting For”

ABC

Supervising Sound Editor: Daniel Colman, MPSE

Supervising Dialogue Editor: Stefani Feldman, MPSE

Dialogue Editors: Fernanda Domene

 

The Right Stuff: “Flight”

Disney+

Supervising Sound Editor: Walter Newman

Supervising ADR Editor: Brian Armstrong, MPSE

Dialogue Editors: Darleen Stoker

 

Snowpiercer: “Trouble Comes Sideways”

TNT

Supervising Sound Editor: Sandra Portman, MPSE

ADR Editor: Eric Mouawad, Francisco Frial

Dialogue Editors: Eric Mouawad

 

The Umbrella Academy: “The End of Something”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: John Benson

Dialogue Editors: Jason Krane, MPSE

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Episodic Short Form – Effects / Foley

The 100: “The Final War”

The CW

Supervising Sound Editors: Norval “Charlie” Crutcher, III, MPSE; Vince Tennant

Sound Designer: Peter D. Lago, MPSE

Foley Editors: Clayton Weber, Adam DeCoster, Jacob Houchen, MPSE

Foley Artist: Sanaa Kelley

 

Hanna: “The Trial”

Amazon

Supervising Sound Editor: Joe Beal

Sound Designer: Steve Browell

Foley Editor: Philip Clements

Foley Artist: Anna Wright

 

Locke & Key: “Head Games”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: J.R. Fountain

Sound Effects Editors: Dashen Naidoo

Foley Artist: Steve Baine

 

Mandalorian S2: Chapter 13: The Jedi

Disney+

Supervising Sound Editors: David Acord, Matthew Wood

Sound Effects Editors: Benjamin A. Burtt, J.R. Grubbs

Foley Editor: Richard Gould

Foley Artists: Ronni Brown, Jana Vance

 

Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: “What We’re Fighting For”

ABC

Supervising Sound Editor: Daniel Colman, MPSE

Foley Editors: Randall Guth

Foley Artists: Pamela Kahn, Dominique Decaudain, Nancy Parker, MPSE; Mike Marino

 

The Right Stuff: “Flight”

Disney+

Supervising Sound Editor: Walter Newman, MPSE

Sound Designer: Kenneth Young

Foley Editor: Peter Reynolds

Foley Artists: Sanaa Kelley, Adam DeCoster

 

Snowpiercer: “Trouble Comes Sideways”

TNT

Supervising Sound Editor: Sandra Portman, MPSE

Sound Designer: James Fonnyadt, MPSE

Sound Effects Editor: Gregorio Gomez

Foley Editor: Dario DiSanto, MPSE

Foley Artist: Maureen Murphy, MPSE

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Episodic Long Form – Music / Musical

Better Call Saul: “Magic Man”

AMC

Music Editor: Jason Tregoe Newman

 

The Boys: “Nothing Like It in The World”

Amazon

Music Editor: Christopher Brooks

 

Bridgerton: “Shock and Delight”

Netflix

Music Editor: Brittany Dubay

 

Ozark: “Kevin Cronin Was Here”

Netflix

Music Editors: Jason Tregoe Newman, Stephen Lotwis

 

The Queen’s Gambit: “Adjournment”

Netflix

Music Editor: Tom Kramer

 

Raised By Wolves: “Pilot”

HBO Max

Music Editors: James Bladon, Lewis Morison, David Menke

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Episodic Long Form – Dialogue/ADR

Better Call Saul: “Something Unforgivable”

AMC

Supervising Sound Editor: Nick Forshager, MPSE

Supervising ADR Editor: Kathryn Madsen, MPSE

Dialogue Editor: Jane Boegel

 

Dark – “Life And Death”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Alexander Wuertz

Supervising Dialogue Editor: Thomas Kalbér

Supervising ADR Editor: Benjamin Hörbe

Dialogue Editor: Gaston Ibarroule

ADR Editor: Clemens Nürnberger

 

Fargo: “The Pretend War”

FX

Supervising Sound Editor: Nick Forshager, MPSE

Supervising ADR Editor: Tim Boggs

Supervising Dialogue Editor: Todd Niesen, MPSE

 

Ozark: “All In”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Nick Forshager, MPSE

Dialogue Editor: Todd Niesen, MPSE

ADR Editor: Steve Grubbs

 

Star Trek: Picard “The Impossible Box”

CBS All Access

Supervising Sound Editor: Matthew E. Taylor

Dialogue Editor: Sean Heissinger

 

The Crown: “Fairytale”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Lee Walpole, MPSE

Dialogue Editor: Jeff Richardson

ADR Editors: Tom Williams, Steve Little

 

The Queen’s Gambit: “End Game”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Gregg Swiatlowski

Dialogue Editor: Eric Hirsch

ADR Editors: Wylie Statemen, MPSE; Leo Marcil, Eric Hoehn

 

Westworld: “The Mother of Exiles”

HBO

Supervising Sound Editor: Sue Gamsaragan Cahill

Dialogue Editors: Jane Boegel-Koch, Tim Tuchrello

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Episodic Long Form – Effects / Foley

Better Call Saul: “Bagman”

AMC

Supervising Sound Editors: Nick Forshager, MPSE; Kathryn Madsen, MPSE

Sound Designer: Todd Toon, MPSE

Sound Effects Editor: Matt Temple

Foley Editor: Jeff Cranford

Foley Artists: Gregg Barbanell, MPSE; Alex Ulrich, MPSE

 

Devs Episode 3

FX

Supervising Sound Editors: Glenn Freemantle, MPSE; Ben Barker

Sound Designer: Glenn Freemantle, MPSE

Sound Effects Editors: Danny Freemantle, Nick Freemantle, Rob Malone, Dayo James

Foley Editor: Lilly Blazewicz

Foley Artists: Peter Burgis, Zoe Freed

 

Ozark: “All In”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Nick Forshager, MPSE

Sound Effects Editors: Matt Decker, Matt Temple, Mark Allen, MPSE

Foley Editors: Amy Barber, Jonathan Bruce, Julia Huberman

Foley Artists: Jonathan Bruce, Ben Parker

 

The Queen’s Gambit: “End Game”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Gregg Swiatlowski

Sound Designers: Eric Hoehn, Patrick Cicero

Sound Effects Editors: Eric Hirsch, James David Redding III

Dialogue Editor: Wylie Stateman, MPSE

Foley Editor: Rachel Chancey

 

Raised By Wolves: Episode 1

HBO Max

Supervising Sound Editor: Victor Ennis

Sound Designer and Effects Editor: Jamey Scott, MPSE

Foley Artists: Alicia Stevenson, Dawn Lunsford

 

Star Trek: Discovery “That Hope is You, Part 1”

CBS All Access

Supervising Sound Editor: Matthew E. Taylor

Sound Designers: Tim Farrell, Harry Cohen, MPSE

Sound Effects Editor: Michael Schapiro

Foley Editors: Clay Weber, Darrin Mann

Foley Artists: Alyson Dee Moore, Chris Moriana

 

Star Trek: Picard “Et in Arcadia Ego, Part 2”

CBS All Access

Supervising Sound Editor: Matthew E. Taylor

Sound Designers: Tim Farrell, Harry Cohen, MPSE

Sound Effects Editor: Michael Schapiro

Foley Editors: Clay Weber, Darrin Mann

Foley Artists: Alyson Dee Moore, Chris Moriana

 

Westworld: “The Mother of Exiles”

HBO

Supervising Sound Editor: Sue Gamsaragan Cahill

Sound Designer:  Benjamin Cook, MPSE

Sound Effects Editor: Shaughnessy Hare

Foley Editor:  Brendan Croxon

Foley Artist: Adrian Medhurst

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Single Presentation

A Christmas Carol

FX

Supervising Sound Editor: Lee Walpole, MPSE

Sound Effects Editors: Saoirse Christopherson, Andy Kennedy

Dialogue Editor: Ian Wilkinson

Foley Editors: Catherine Thomas, Anna Wright

Music Editor: Cecile Tournesac

 

The Comey Rule: Episode 2

Showtime

Supervising Sound Editors: Andrew DeCristofaro, MPSE; Darren “Sunny” Warkentin, MPSE

Sound Effects Editors: Mike Payne, MPSE; Hector C. Gika, MPSE

Foley Editor: Alexander Jongbloed

Music Editor: David Metzner

 

Hamilton

Disney+

Supervising Sound Editor: Tony Volante

Sound Effects Editor: Dave Paterson

Sound Designer: Nevin Steinberg

Music Editors: Dan Timmons, Derik Lee

 

Into the Dark: The Current Occupant

Hulu

Supervising Sound Editors: Roland Thai, MPSE; Justin W. Walker, MPSE

Foley Editors: Amy Barber, Julia Huberman, Richard Wills

Foley Artist: Jonathan Bruce

Music Editor: Mark Skillingberg

 

Self Made: Inspired by the Life of Madam C.J. Walker: “The Fight of the Century”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Bobbi Banks

Sound Designers: Ezra Dweck, Paul Menichini, MPSE

Dialogue Editor: Bernard Weiser, MPSE

Foley Editor: Butch Wolf

Foley Artist: Sanaa Kelley

Music Editor: Stephen Lotwis

 

Unorthodox: “Part 1”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Daniel Iribarren

ADR Editor: Toby Bilz

Sound Designers: Sebastian Morsch, Paul Rischer

Foley Artist: Victor Shcheglov

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Non-Theatrical Animation Long Form

Batman: Death in The Family

Warner Bros.

Supervising Sound Editor: Devon Bowman

Supervising ADR Editor: Mark A. Keatts

Sound Effects Editors: George Peters, Alfredo Douglas

Dialogue Editors: Kelly Foley Downs, Patrick Foley

Sound Designer: Robert Hargreaves

ADR Editor: John Reynolds

Music Editor: Christopher Drake

 

The Boss Baby: Back in Business: “Get That Baby”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Jeff Shiffman, MPSE

Sound Effects Editors: Greg Rubin, Ian Howard

Dialogue Editors: Kerry Iverson-Brody, Xinyue Yu

Foley Editor: Carol Ma

 

DuckTales: “Let’s Get Dangerous!”

Disney

Supervising Sound Editor: Jeff Shiffman, MPSE

Sound Effects Editor: Katie Maynard

Dialogue Editor: Xinyue Yu

Foley Editor: Carol Ma

 

The Epic Tales of Captain Underpants: “The Xtreme Xploits of the Xplosive Xmas”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Jeff Shiffman, MPSE

Supervising Dialogue Editor: Kerry Iverson-Brody

Sound Effects Editors: Greg Rubin, Jessey Drake, MPSE

Dialogue Editor: Xinyue Yu

Foley Editor: Carol Ma

 

The Loud House: “Schooled”

Nickelodeon

Sound Effects Editors: Brad Meyer, MPSE; Tess Fournier, MPSE; Tim Vindigni

Dialogue Editor: John Deligiannis

Foley Editor: Carol Ma

 

Mortal Kombat Legends: “Scorpion’s Revenge”

Warner Bros. Animation

Supervising Sound Editors: Rob McIntyre, MPSE; D.J. Lynch

Supervising ADR Editor: Mark A. Keatts

Sound Effects Editors: Lawrence Reyes, Roger Pallan

Dialogue Editors: Mike Garcia, Kelly Foley Downs, David M. Cowan, Patrick Foley

Sound Designers: Marc Schmidt, Evan Dockter

ADR Editors: Mark Mercado, Jon Abelardo

Foley Editors: Roberto Allegria, Derek Swanson

 

To Your Last Death

Coverage Ink / Quiver Distr.

Supervising Sound Designer and Editor: Michael Archacki

Sound Editor: Matthew Schaff, MPSE

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Non-Theatrical Documentary

Be Water

ESPN

Supervising Sound Editor: Nas Parkash

 

Beastie Boys Story

Apple TV+

Supervising Sound Editor: Martyn Zub, MPSE

Sound Effects Editors: Paul Aulicino, MPSE

 

Bruce Springsteen’s Letter to You

Apple TV+

Supervising Sound Editor: Steve Urban, MPSE

Music Editor: Brandon Duncan

 

High Score Ep.1 Boom & Bust

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Keith Hodne

 

Jeffrey Epstein: Filthy Rich: “The Island”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: R. Hollis Smith

 

The Last Dance Ep.1

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Keith Hodne

 

Laurel Canyon: A Place in Time: “Episode 1”

EPIX/Amblin

Supervising Sound Editor: Jonathan Greber

Sound Effects Editor: Lucas Miller

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Non-Theatrical Feature

Bad Education

HBO

Supervising Sound Editor: Gene Park

Sound Effects Editor: Ric Schnupp

Dialogue Editor: Craig Kyllonen

ADR Editor: Colin Alexander, MPSE

Music Editor: Shari Johanson, MPSE

 

Bliss

Amazon

Supervising Sound Editors: Steve Boeddeker, Lee Salevan

Dialogue Editor: Michael Feuser

ADR Editor: Lidia Tamplenizza

Foley Editor: Igor Nikolić

Foley Artist: Jay Peck

 

Blow the Man Down

Amazon

Supervising Sound Editor: Chris Foster

Dialogue Editors: Matt Rigby, Michael Flannery

ADR Editors: John Bowen, Nora Linde

Foley Editor: Laura Heinzinger

Music Editor: Brian McOmber

 

The Bygone

Tubi

Supervising Sound Editor: David Barber, MPSE

Sound Effects Editors: Ben Zarai, Roland Thai, MPSE; George Haddad, MPSE; Dave Eichhorn

Foley Editor: Michael Kreple

Foley Artists: Gonzalo “Bino” Espinoza, David Kitchens, MPSE

 

Christmas On the Square

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Trip Brock, MPSE

Supervising ADR Editor: Jacob Ortiz, MPSE

Sound Effects Editor: Raymond Park, MPSE

Dialogue Editors: Jackie Johnson, Bruce Stubblefield

Supervising Music Editors: Marc S. Perlman, MPSE; Michael T. Ryan, MPSE

Music Editor: Tom Ruttledge, Michael Farrow

 

Safety

Disney

Supervising Sound Editors: Christopher S. Aud, MPSE; Byron Wilson

Sound Effects Editors: Phil Barrie, Greg ten Bosch, MPSE; Aaron Glascock

Dialogue Editor: Daniel Saxlid, MPSE

Foley Editor: Terry Rodman, MPSE

Supervising Music Editor: Steve Durkee

 

Troop Zero

Amazon

Supervising Sound Editors: Erin Oakley, Sean McCormick

Sound Effects Editors: Paul Pirola, Andrew Neil, Dylan Barfield

Dialogue Editors: Robert Chen, Will Riley, MPSE

Foley Editor: Troy Mauri

Foley Artist: Adrian Medhurst

 

The Ultimate Playlist of Noise

Hulu

Supervising Sound Editor: Odin Benitez, MPSE

Supervising ADR Editor: Ryan Briley

Sound Designer: Russell Topal, MPSE

Foley Editor: Rustam Gimadlyev

Foley Artists: Bogdan Zavarzin, Natalia Syeryakova

Music Editor: Katerina Tolkishevskaya

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Computer Cinematic

Destiny 2: Beyond Light

Bungie Studios

Director of Sound Design: David Henry

Music Editors: Skye Lewin, MPSE; Michael Salvatori, Josh Mosser, Michael Sechrist

Supervising Sound Editors: Adam Boyd, MPSE; Bryen Hensley, MPSE; Evan Buehler

Dialogue De-noising: Josh Mosser

Sound Designer: Stosh Tuszynski, Katie Waters, MPSE; Nick Interlandi, John Loranger, Jon Persson

 

Ghost of Tsushima

Sony Interactive Entertainment

Supervising Sound Editor: Glen Gathard

Dialogue Lead: Kyle Richards

Sound Designers: Adam Oakley, Jimmy Boyle, Peter Hanson, Rowan Watson

Sound Editors: Dora Filipovic, Sophia Leader, George Lee, James Hayday, George Riley, Stefano Marchetti

Foley Artists: Zoe Freed, Rebecca Heathcote

Foley Editor: Jemma Riley-Tolch

 

The Last of Us Part II

Sony Interactive Entertainment

Supervising Sound Editor: Shannon Potter

Sound Effects Editors: Patrick Ginn, Kyle Bailey, Michael Finley, Chad Bedell, Eric Paulsen, Keith Bilderbeck, Jim Diaz

Foley Artists: Dawn Fintor, Alicia Stevenson

Audio Director: Robert Krekel

Sound Designers: Justin Mullens, Beau Jimenez, Neil Uchitel, Jesse Garcia, MPSE; Michael Marchisotto

Supervising Music Editors: Rob Goodson, Scott Shoemaker

Music Editors: Anthony Caruso, Tyler Crowder, Sonia Coronado, Adam Kallibjian, Adam Kallibjian, James Zolyak, Ted Kocher, Scott Bergstrom, Tao-Ping Chen

 

Ori and the Will of the Wisps: Willow Ceremony

Xbox Game Studios

Audio Director: Kristoffer Larson

Audio Lead: Guy Whitmore, Alexander Leeman Johnson

 

Spider-Man: Marvel’s Miles Morales

Sony Interactive Entertainment

Supervising Sound Editor: Emile Mika, Csaba Wagner, Samuel Justice

Sound Designers: Zack Boguki, Aaron Sanchez, Jeff Darby, Nate Bonisteel, Gary Miranda, Mark MacBride

Supervising Music Editor: Rob Goodson

Dialogue Leads: Patrick Michalak, Ryan Schaad

Audio Leads: Dwight Okahara

Dialogue Editors: Tim Schumann, Alyssa Galindo, Tyler Held, Michelangelo Muscariello, Jaime Marcello

Supervising Music Editor: Scott Shoemaker

Music Editors: Tao Ping Chen, Andrew Buresh, Ernest Johnson, Ted Kocher, Sonia Coronado, Scott Bergstrom, Tyler Crowder, Adam Kallibjian, James Zolyak

 

Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

Electronic Arts

Supervising Sound Editor: Bryan O. Watkins

Supervising Music Editor: Nick Laviers

Sound Designers: Mitchell Osias, Ben Burtt, Michael C. Schapiro, Luis Galdames, MPSE; Nick Von Kaenel, Sam Bird, Oscar Coen, Paxson Helgesen

Supervising Foley Editor: Caron Weidner

Foley Editors: Eric Lindemann, Darren Maynard, MPSE; Matthew Klimek, MPSE

Foley Artists: Chris Moriana, Alyson D. Moore

Dialogue Lead: Harrison Deutsch

Dialogue Editors: Dan P. Francis, Garrett Montgomery, MPSE; Stefan Kovatchev, Nicholas Friedemann, Harrison Deutsch

Music Editors: Nick Laviers, Kory McMaster

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Computer Interactive Game Play

Ghost of Tsushima

Sony Interactive Entertainment

Audio Director: Rev. Dr. Bradley D Meyer

Audio Lead: Adam Lidbetter

Supervising Music Editors: Peter Scaturro, Keith Leary

Music Editors: Andrew Buresh, Adam Kallibjian, Nicholas Mastroianni, Sonia Coronado, Ted Kocher

Dialogue Lead: Kyle Richards

Dialogue Editors: Heather Plunkard, Kevin McClelland, Bianca Salinas

Sound Designers: Josh Lord, Mike Niederquell, Erik Buensuceso, Safar Bake, Andres Herrera, Michelle Thomas, Michael Pitaniello, Tye Hastings, Rob Castro

 

The Last of Us Part II

Sony Interactive Entertainment

Audio Director: Robert Krekel

Supervising Sound Editor: Shannon Potter

Supervising Dialogue Editors: Maged Khalil Ragab

Supervising Music Editor: Rob Goodson, Scott Shoemaker

Sound Designers: Neil Uchitel, Beau Jimenez, Justin Mullens, Jesse Garcia, MPSE; Michael Marchisotto, Derek Brown, Jordan Denton

Dialogue Editors: Grayson Stone, Julius Kukla, Thomas Barrett, Jaime Marcelo, Erik Schmall, Duncan Brown, Cesar Marenco

Foley Editors: Eolyne Arnold, MPSE

Sound Effects Editors: Patrick Ginn, Michael Finley, Kyle Bailey

Music Editors: Anthony Caruso, Tyler Crowder, Tao-Ping Chen, Sonia Coronado, Adam Kallibjian, Samuel Marshall, James Zolyak, Ted Kocher, Scott Bergstrom

Foley Artists: Dawn Fintor, Alicia Stevenson

 

Spider-Man: Marvel’s Miles Morales

Sony Interactive Entertainment

Supervising Music Editors: Rob Goodson

Supervising Sound Editors: Emile Mika

Audio Lead: Jerry Berlongieri, Jamie McMenamy

Dialogue Lead: Patrick Michalak, Ryan Schaad

Sound Designers: Herschell Bailey, Blake Johnson, David Yingling, Brooke Yap, Tyler Cornett, Johannes Hammers, Ryan See, Zack Boguki, Aaron Sanchez, Jeff Darby, Nate Bonisteel

Dialogue Editors: Tim Schumann, Tyler Held, Michelangelo Muscariello, Jaime Marcello

Music Editors: Tao Ping Chen, Andrew Buresh, Ernest Johnson, Ted Kocher, Scott Shoemaker, Sonia Coronado, Scott Bergstrom, Tyler Crowder, Adam Kallibjian, James Zolyak

 

Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

Electronic Arts

Sound Designers: Nick Von Kaenel, Kevin Notar, Stefan Kovatchev, Oscar Coen, Paxson Helgesen, Sam Bird, Caron Weidner, Mike Schapiro, Ben Burtt, Nick Laviers, Christopher Clanin, Erick Ocampo, Jeremy Rogers, Steve Johnson

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Animation Short Form

Archer “Cold Fusion”

FX

Sound Designers: JC Richardson, Pierre Cerrato

Music Editor: JG Thirlwell

 

Baba Yaga

Amazon

Supervising Sound Editor: Scot Stafford

Sound Designer: Andrew Vernon, Jamey Scott, MPSE

Sound Effects Editor: Brendan Wolf

Music Editor: Rex Darnell

 

The Boss Baby: Back in Business: “Escape From Krinkles”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Jeff Shiffman, MPSE

Sound Effects Editors: Greg Rubin, Ian Howard

Dialogue Editors: Kerry Iverson-Brody, Xinyue Yu

Foley Editor: Carol Ma

 

Canvas

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editors: Andre Fenley, Jermaine Stegall

Sound Designer: Justin Pearson

Sound Effects Editor: Andrew Vernon

Foley Artist: Frank Aglieri-Rinella

 

Clone Wars: The Phantom Apprentice

Disney+

Supervising Sound Editors: Matthew Wood, David Acord

Sound Effects Editor: Kimberly Patrick

Foley Editor: Frank Rinella

Foley Artist: Margie O’Malley

Dialogue Editor: Tony Diaz

Music Editor: Peter Lam

 

Star Trek: Short Trek “Ephraim and Dot”

CBS All Access

Supervising Sound Editor: Matthew E. Taylor

Sound Designer: Tim Farrell, Harry Cohen, MPSE

Music Editor: Moira Marquis, Stan Jones

ADR Editor: Sean Heissinger

 

Wizards: “Spellbound”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editors: James Miller, Otis Van Osten

Foley Editor: Tommy Sarioglou, Aran Tanchum

Dialogue Editors: Carlos Sanches, Jason Oliver

Foley Artist: Vincent Guisetti

 

 

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Student Film (Verna Fields Award)

Kadalin Kural

Annapurna College of Film and Media

Supervising Sound Editor: Vandana Ramakrishna

Dialogue Editor: Vandana Ramakrishna

Supervising Music Editor: Vandana Ramakrishna

Sound Designer: Vandana Ramakrishna

Sound Effects Editor: Vandana Ramakrishna

Foley Artist: Varun Arsid

 

Lakutshon’ Ilanga (When the Sun Sets)

Dodge College of Film and Media Arts

Supervising Sound Editor: Andree Lin

Sound Designer: Andree Lin

Foley Artist: Andrew Gutierrez

 

Las Escondidas

Chapman University

Supervising Sound Editor: Karthik Mohan Vijaymohan

 

Listen to Us

SCAD

Supervising Sound Editor: Juliana Henao

Sound Effects Editor: Dominique Maio

Dialogue Editors: Juliana Henao

Music Editor: Nia R. Dawson

 

Meow or Never!

The National Film and Television School

Supervising Sound Designer and Editor: Harry J.N. Parsons

 

O Black Hole!

The National Film and Television School

Supervising Sound Designer and Editor: Ed Rousseau

 

Phantom Spectre

USC School of Cinematic Arts

Supervising Sound Editor: Paul J. Vogel, MPSE

Dialogue Editors: Ryan Vaughan, MPSE; Audrey Gu

Foley Artist: Isa Vogel, Miska Kajanus

 

The Unknown

The National Film and Television School

Supervising Sound Editor: Yin Lee

Sound Designer: Yin Lee

 

MPSE • www.mpse.org

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Repairing Spoken-Word Recordings with iZotope Rx 8 Advanced – A Real-World Review

iZotope Rx Advanced 8 offers a number of modules for cleaning up spoken-word material, including (seen here) De-plosive, Spectral Repair, Voice-De noise, Dialogue De-reverb, Breath Control and Mouth De-click.
iZotope Rx 8 Advanced offers a number of modules for cleaning up spoken-word material, including (seen here) De-plosive, Spectral Repair, Voice-De noise, Dialogue De-reverb, Breath Control and Mouth De-click.

With hosts, guests and talent comfortably seated in your purpose-built and acoustically-treated  isolation room, the discussions are easily recorded with minimal bleed, defined clarity and no intrusion or distraction from unwanted sounds and noise. Yeah right! The truth is that for most of us voice recordists producing podcasts, audio books and interviews our audio is polluted with unwanted sounds of numerous varieties that must be prevented or removed if we expect rapt attention to the content. It can be hard to stay focused on dialogue when competing voices, air conditioning, ground hums, noisy appliances, passing trucks, airplanes, sibilance, plosives, ticks, clicks and massive vortexes (actually breaths, amplified to ridiculous levels) are stealing our attention. Luckily today’s digital, analytical, often aided by machine-learning software programs (and certain hardware pieces) are capable of not only mitigating, but downright removing extraneous noise. I’ll be using iZotope Rx 8 Advanced premium software in my examples, but there a number of competing programs that accomplish the same goals, in sometimes similar manners.

Before we delve into fixes, some effort should be spent making sure we are capturing the best  audio we can before applying processing. The cleanest and purest signal possible will ensure less severe processing, more successful processing and undetectability.

 

Capturing the cleanest signal possible helps ensure better processing results later on. Start with a room that allows spacing between people, with each speaker ideally seated in a circular pattern.
Capturing the cleanest signal possible helps iZotope Rx 8 Advanced create better processing results later on. Start with a room that allows spacing between people, with each speaker ideally seated in a circular pattern. Getty Images/iStockphoto

The Room Is Key

Start with a room that allows spacing between the persons, with each speaker in the null(s) of the other’s mic(s) and seated in a circular pattern for large groups, which encourages interaction, allows more visual communication and rejects mic bleed. Make sure the room is devoid of anything that creates sound, including fridges, air purifiers, computers, cell phones or even hummy DC adaptor “wall warts”. Seal up windows, cover them with blankets, seal up doorways with weather-proofing (whether an interior or exterior door), dampen air ducts, reduce unwanted room ambience with acoustic treatments (ie. foam/fiberglass/cloth absorbent panels) and place diffusors on the closest walls to scatter sound waves and stop the dull muddiness that results from too much absorptive treatment in a small space.

All speaking talent will need closed-back headphones that don’t leak sound excessively, a pop filter on their mic to reduce plosives and enough room to back-off of the mic when needed. It is wise to have water available in glasses (plastic bottles can be noisy), a notepad (to aid memory and reduce unwanted interjections) and clean cloths (to dampen sneezing/coughing or other personal disasters).

Basic Mixing

Some basic mixing technique may be corrective enough to reduce any noise problems to the inconsequential. The big three tools here are equalization, compression/limiting and automation.

Assuming you’ve captured clean mic signal, sometimes a little filtering is all we need for high fidelity. If you used a bright condenser mic realize that too much crispy, treble-y, high-end definition can be irritating (if nearly painful). If so, employ either a high-frequency shelf somewhere around 8 kHz (reducing/attenuating three or four dB, or to taste) or engage a low-sloped low-pass filter somewhere between 12 to 18 kHz to remove the really high stuff.

Conversely, much of the environmental noise causing us trouble is found down in the low frequencies (ie. heating/cooling rumble, passing jets, appliance rumble, foot steps, traffic noise, the mic placed too close etc.) so a high-pass filter is essential. Engaging one around 80 Hz will remove noise without reducing “chesty-ness” but don’t be afraid to filter up to almost 200 Hz if severe low-frequency noise is persistent. The cumulative positive effects across multiple mics can be amazingly effective!

Many trained speakers are quite talented at maintaining ideal levels; knowing how to “stage whisper” or “half yell” for maximum effect without issue. Most people are terrible at such skills, so try to capture voice with a touch of compression to smooth out levels as you record. If your minimal set-up doesn’t allow this consider getting a mic preamp and a compressor (or all in one), or the purchase of a modern recording interface that allows software-based compression as you record. Then, still compress the track liberally in your DAW and apply limiting (severe compression) when stray peaks are stubbornly popping into the red.

Perhaps most importantly, you should automate levels in key moments to maintain consistent thematic focus. Like riding a physical fader for volume, automation can truly feature the right persons at the right moments; I aim to reduce volume on any given track that is not currently in use (or is relegated to only “ok’s” and “uh-huh’s) by about -4 to -8 dB. This maintains a consistent “air” and “presence” even as speakers take turns, but can still focus attention where you want it. If your noise problems were minimal to start, with only occasional major disruptions (ie. sirens or sneezes), such automation might be enough to fore-go the use of any corrective software.

 

Software Handles the Rest

If problems still persist, there is more we could do with surgical editing, extreme EQ and extreme automation, but why dig that deep when intelligent software can do the job more quickly, with less effort and with likely better results.

The HVAC of summer and winter makes more noise than is acceptable to reach Amazon/Audible’s audio book technical standards, so I clean each voice track with iZotope Rx 8 Advanced using the Voice De-noise module. This process requires a brief sample of the noise problem, so I use few seconds of pre-roll audio for analysis. Once De-noise has “learned” both the noise and the vocal timbre it can neatly remove noise for the entirety of the track. I often find -12 dB of reduction (set for Dialogue and Gentle) to be sufficient to achieve noise-floor standards, but a second less-intense pass can be done for bad problems. Leave a few seconds of each track’s pre-roll noisy so you can clearly verify the improvement the processing has made and check for “liquid” artifacts (if so, you’ll need to undo and process less severely). Remember to clean each track with its own uniquely learned noise profile, as there can are significant differences from track to track.

Popping P plosives and prominent breaths are horrible when monitored via today’s subwoofers and earbuds, so make sure you’ve removed all of them … or should I say reduced them to proper levels, as P’s, B’s and W’s require a little burst of air to function. The De-plosive module sure is quick and effective. Simply highlight the offensive plosives only (they are usually easily seen, with a big ole wave of low-frequency energy in the waveform) and adjust Sensitivity and Strength parameters dependent on severity of the issue. A second pass can be done, but you’ll seldom need it. De-breath is similarly useful in that it does a great job of moderating the problem without the stark removing of breath(ing). Beats the heck out of severe editing and placing “room tone” in the gaps!

The opposite of plosives, excessive sibilance can make S’s, C’s and K’s sound like little knives in your ears and they only get worse with bad earbuds and distorted playback devices. Treble reduction won’t cut it and side-chained compression is too complicated, but many de-esser plug-in’s will quite effectively manage sibilance. However, since Rx8 has a De-ess module it’s faster to make the fixes there. You’ll likely only need adjustments to Threshold and Cut-Off Frequency to get great results. Like the De-plosive module, only process the moments with problems, not the whole track top-to-tail like with Voice De-noise.

If you just couldn’t get the room right, or recorded in a big reverby space, the Dialogue De-reverb module works miracles. More importantly, I have found that this module works quite well at reducing short ambiences that are far quicker than reverb tails, in places like bedrooms, offices and meeting rooms. Some expertise and experimenting will be in order here with adjustments to Reduction, Sensitivity and Ambience Preservation and stereo “linkage”. Fear not, with a little practice it works way better than it ought to.

Austrian Audio Hi-X50 and Hi-X55 Headphones – A Real-World Review

BABY Audio Parallel Aggressor Plug-In—A Real-World Review

De-hum and De-rustle are both effective at their respective eponymous functions and easy enough to use, but Mouth De-click deserves the MVP award. My bane are those nasty, irritating mouth clicks/snaps that permeate vocal tracks from under-hydrated talent, so I’m elated that these modules actually work! You won’t need to adjust the Sensitivity or Click Widening that much, but do expect to require two, even three passes, on the worst offenders.

I routinely use all of the above modules to achieve compliance, but sometimes situations call for even more aggressive processing. Spectral Repair allows the targeted removal and replacement of unwanted sonic events (closing doors, dropped objects, sneezes etc.) in accordance with the time domain and the frequency domain. That is, you can select a lasso tool and neatly draw around the problem noise using a waveform and a spectrograph to clearly see the issue, then either simply attenuate it or replace the problem with audio from before or after the disturbance. Once you’ve experimented with Strength and Bands you’ll find this easier than my descriptions and miraculous.

There are three other highly specialized modules that use machine-learning for the odd difficult tasks that you may rarely if ever, encounter. For multi-location productions or (especially) interviews where the locations sound distractingly different, Ambience Match is a life-saver. You’ll need to teach the track the ambience you desire from another track, but it’s worth the effort to reduce such issues. If you receive audio from another location that is digitally ruined (ie. lossy encoding or low sample rate) Spectral Recovery can actually replace lost high-end information intelligently. Finally, Dialogue Isolate can save really poor audio (surely not recorded by you!) that suffers too much background noise. Careful adjustments must be made to Sensitivity and Ambience Preservation and multiple passes may be required, but this was your last stop … if your voice audio isn’t clean enough after all this you might need to refocus on better tracking.

One For the Road

It takes a lot of effort to ensure voice audio good enough that the audio itself becomes a non-factor, invisible and not even thought of. It is only then that we can truly maximize the goal of enabling communication and conveying ideas. You know that you’ve run your sessions right and used iZotope Rx 8 Advanced to edit/process/clean properly when all anyone can talk about is the actual content itself.

iZotope Rx 8 Advanced • www.izotope.com/en/products/rx.html

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com