Tag Archives: Live

VF Live: Pure Vinyl Records

Hip-hop, soul, jazz, and beyond from the Brixton shop.

In VF Live, artists take you inside their homes, record shops, and studios for intimate selects and mixes.

In Pure Vinyl Records’ first set, the south London shop selects hip-hop, soul, and jazz records from Madlib, Fela Kuti, Nas, and more.

Watch and listen above, check out the tracklist below.

Tracklist:

1. Aston ‘Family Man’ Barret – Soul Constitution
2. Soul Vendors – Discipline
3. Myrna Hague – Touch me Baby
4. Aston ‘Family Man’ Barret – Cell Block 11
5. Russ Henderson and his Caribbean Boys – West Indian Drums
6. Madlib – Deep Instrumental
7. Hustlers of Culture – Flipjack
8. Jaylib – The Official
9. J Dilla – Body Movin’
10. Yesterdays New Quintet – Papa
11. Joe McDuphrey Experience – Solar Waves
12. James Brown – King Heroin
13. Mo Kolours – On My Way
14. Nas – Nas Is Like
15. Boogie Down Productions – The Racist
16. Quasimoto – Tomorrow Never Knows
17. J Dilla – Wild
18. Madlib – Riot Call
19. Yesterdays New Quintet – Prelude
20. Al Dobson Jr – Nankoo on Keys
21. Al Dobson Jr – What it is, Pt.2
22. Fela Kuti – Coffin for Head of State

Original Resource is The Vinyl Factory

VF Live: Dean Bryce

Soul, gospel, and reggae records with the London selector.

In VF Live, collectors take you inside their homes, record shops, and studios for intimate sets and mixes.

Don’t Sleep Music founder Dean Bryce steps up for his firs VF Live set, playing calming records to bring joy.

“This isn’t actually a mix it’s a collection of tracks that I strung together to help us all escape the madness that we’ve been going through this year. The selections include soul, gospel, and some reggae to liven things up.

This is escapism volume 1, and the hope is that it adds a little calmness to life, especially for those who have been solo during lockdown.”

Original Resource is The Vinyl Factory

Restart-19 COVID Concert Experiment Shares Results

Dr. Stefan Moritz, head of Halle University’s clinical infectious diseases department, presents one of the trackers used to record where concertgoers went during their time at the test concerts.
Dr. Stefan Moritz, head of Halle University’s clinical infectious diseases department, presents one of the trackers used
to record where concertgoers went during their time at the Restart-19 test concerts. Halle University

Leipzig, Germany (December 3, 2020)—According to the results of Restart-19, an experiment in Germany, indoor sports and cultural events including music concerts could return soon—under the right conditions. The test was conducted by a team from Leipzig’s Halle University, who report that “seated indoor events, when conducted under hygiene precautions and with adequate ventilation, have small effects on the spread of COVID-19.”

The study was held in August at an 8,000-seat arena in Leipzig, where popular German singer Tim Bendzko and his band played to about 1,200 people. The 10-hour event was designed to test the potential spread of the novel coronavirus through contact and exposure to aerosol droplets. The results, published in November, have not been peer reviewed.

The team, led by Dr. Stefan Moritz, head of the university’s clinical infectious diseases department, designed the event to study three different scenarios: a pre-pandemic concert with no safety measures, an event with some social distancing and a hygiene regimen, and a reduced crowd with concertgoers positioned about six feet apart. The experiment included various entrance and exit scenarios, bathroom breaks and simulated food and drink purchasing.

Attendees, who were required to have tested negative for COVID-19 no more than 48 hours prior to the event, had their temperatures taken on arrival, were given N95 face masks and were provided with tracking devices to measure their social distancing. Fluorescent disinfectants were applied to their hands so that the team could study which surfaces concertgoers touched the most. The results suggest that good ventilation, strict hygiene protocols, limited capacities and social distancing can minimize the potential for spreading the virus. Computer modeling of larger audiences—the organizers had hoped for 4,000 volunteers—showed similar results.

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Adequate ventilation appears to be key to safely hosting mass gatherings of people in indoor venues. Researchers found that the density of viruses in aerosols was decreased through regular air circulation. “We knew that ventilation was important, but we didn’t expect it to be that important,” the team’s Dr. Michael Gekle told The New York Times.

The report stresses the importance of good ventilation: “[I]n scenarios with physical distancing, the resulting contact numbers are rather low and the effective risk depends primarily on the adequacy of the ventilation. Thus, under hygiene protocols and good ventilation, even a substantial number of indoor MGEs [mass gathering events] has only minimal effects on the overall number of infections in the population. However, poor ventilation systems can lead to a considerably higher rate of aerosol expositions and can thereby result in a high number of infections.”

In the experiment, contact was generally less than 15 minutes between participants. Prolonged contact of several minutes was observed during the breaks between performances and during entry to the venue. In the pre-pandemic scenario, contacts tended to accumulate over the duration of the event.

Commenting to The New York Times, Emily Eavis, co-organizer of the Glastonbury Festival, said, “Obviously if masks are going to work for larger gigs, then that’s big progress.” The Leipzig experiment focused on seated events, where social distancing can be managed. Outdoor festivals, though well ventilated, are likely to remain riskier ventures until vaccine use is sufficiently widespread.

The organizers of Spain’s Primavera Sound festival are reportedly helping to conduct research into the efficacy of rapid COVID-19 testing as a method for screening music fans. In the United States, Ticketmaster has floated a plan to vet concertgoers once they have purchased tickets. The scheme would involve third-party testing and vaccine distribution providers and health information reporting companies. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not yet approved any such digital screening services.

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Baseball-Themed ‘Rigoletto’ Covers Bases, Audience

A ground-stacked array of four Kiva enclosures was positioned behind the orchestra section at home plate for center stadium reinforcement for the Tulsa Opera performance.

Tulsa, OK (December 3, 2020)—Mention ballparks and singing to most people and they’ll picture Fenway Park belting “Sweet Caroline,” or maybe a half-sober round of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” at their local field. That’s fine – but what if you added opera singers? In fact, what if you flat-out staged an opera at a ballpark?

That’s what happened in Tulsa, Oklahoma on October 9 at ONEOK Field, home of the Tulsa Drillers minor league team. The Tulsa Opera staged a baseball-themed version of Verdi’s opera Rigoletto with the help of local sound provider Axiom Audio, which fielded an L-Acoustics Kara PA system to cover 1,685 socially-distanced audience members seated in the 2,700-capacity stadium.

Tulsa Opera performs a baseball-themed Rigoletto at ONEOK Field in Tulsa, Oklahoma
Tulsa Opera performs a baseball-themed Rigoletto at ONEOK Field in Tulsa, Oklahoma Shane Bevel

The system consisted of 24 Kara enclosures, six SB18 subs, and three four-speaker clusters of Kiva II used as center and sidefills, all powered by six LA12X and three LA4X amplified controllers. The components were on an Optocore fiber network that also included a DiGiCo SD10 FOH mixing console paired with two SD-Racks.

The event’s PA design was as unique as the venue itself. The stadium management wouldn’t allow rigging to be erected on the field’s grass areas, so the Kara speakers were loaded onto wheeled carts that lined the first and third baselines, four per side, facing the grandstands. A ninth cart was positioned at home plate, just in front of the low risers that were the stage for six orchestra members: two violins, viola, cello, bass and piano. This arrangement provided the necessary coverage for all of the widely-spaced grandstand seating.

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However, it also created the added challenge of putting loudspeakers on the field as the opera vocalists, unfamiliar with wearing wireless microphones, would roam about during the performance, creating the potential for feedback each time they neared a speaker cluster. The solution was to make each cart its own node on the system, putting each of the nine speaker pods on a matrix at the front of house, allowing Front-of-House engineer Steve Colby to turn off individual loudspeaker clusters as a performer approached one.

“We made the speakers individually controllable through the matrix,” said Axiom Audio president Ben Bruce. “Performers were moving all across the infield, and they’re opera singers, so they would be loud. Having individual control over the elements in what was essentially a distributed audio system greatly reduced the potential for gain-before-feedback. The Kara speakers were a perfect fit, in terms of size and power, for this.”

Colby added, “Kara’s coverage properties allowed for a large and effective stereo field between any two of the arrays deployed around the field,” he says. “As a result, we could pan vocals and effects a little farther apart than usual without diminishing the experience for audience members who were not centered between the arrays. In particular, this was noticeable with the amount of artificial acoustic ‘space’ we created using a touch of reverb. The available SPL and overall fidelity of the speakers are quite amazing given the compact size and light weight of the product.”

Tulsa Opera’s Rigoletto • www.tulsaopera.com/rigoletto

Axiom Audio • www.axiom.audio

L-Acoustics • www.l-acoustics.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

VF Live: Poly Ritmo #6

Samba, jazz funk, Italo soul, boogie, and more.

In VF Live, collectors take you inside their homes, record shops, and studios for intimate sets and mixes.

London DJ Poly-Ritmo returns for her latest show direct in her London HQ – playing samba, jazz funk, Italo soul, boogie, and more.

Watch and listen to the set above, check out the tracklist below.

Tracklist:

1. Key Tronics Ensemble – Calypso Of House (Paradise Mix)
2. Mighty Ryeders – Evil Vibrations
3. Mandisa – Summer Love
4. Sunny Boy – Love Affaire
5. Sergio Mendes – If I Ever Lose This Heaven
6. Ruy Maurity – Xango, O Vencedor
7. Sivuca – Asa Branca

Original Resource is The Vinyl Factory

Floating the Audio of the World Rowing Championships

 

The audio needs at this year’s World Rowing Championships included live and streaming sound, eight commentary channels in multiple languages, wireless mics for the medal ceremonies and music playback—all handled on one console.
The audio needs at this year’s World Rowing Championships included live and streaming sound, eight commentary channels in multiple languages, wireless mics for the medal ceremonies and music playback—all handled on one console.

Poznan, Poland (November 30, 2020)—There are nautical enthusiasts who may row, row, row their boat gently down the stream—but they are nowhere to be found at the World Rowing Championships. The word “gently” doesn’t appear either, because the event draws the best athletic rowers from around the world and the competition is fierce. The three-day rowing regatta is the annual culmination of the sport, bringing with it all the drama and excitement that one might expect as boats tear their way across aquatic expanses in record time. Ensuring that all in-person spectators at this year’s edition, held on Lake Malta in Poznan, Poland in October, could hear the commentary and become immersed in the experience was audio engineer Marcin Baran of MTS Studio, who mixed the event on an Allen & Heath SQ-5 console.

Baran chose the SQ-5 to handle all live and streaming sound, including eight commentary channels in multiple languages, wireless mics for the medal ceremonies and music playback. The SQ-5 was fitted with an SLink card, giving Baran the extra SLink port needed to deploy independent GX4816 and DX168 I/O expanders. One expander fed the various zones of the lakeside complex, while the second fed the main PA in the medals area as well as multiple speaker zones in the stands, with help from the built-in delays on the SQ’s busses. Further mixes were sent to commentators’ headphones, to two separate livestreams and to an OB van.

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As heats started on the far side of the lake and ended 2 km from the spectators, a key challenge was to give fans in the grandstands and viewers at home a sense of immersion in the races. A submix of ambient mics captured the waterside sounds and starting signal from the start line, sent via old analog cables laid under the lakebed many years ago. The signal proved quite noisy, so Marcin connected a laptop running Waves X-Noise Native via the SQ’s USB port to identify and tackle the problem frequencies. Once the boats were underway, feeds from ambient mics from cameras mounted on a boat that followed the athletes, keeping the audience in contact with the action on the lake.

With so many different elements to stay across, automation and streamlining of workflows were essential, as Baran noted, “I created one group for all commentators that didn’t feed into any of the mixes, but triggered the duckers on all music inputs. I used an analog Bettermaker mastering limiter for the streaming and I used eight instances of SQ’s DynEQ4 dynamic EQ on all the commentator channels. With the mixer set up in this way, everything practically mixed itself, leaving my hands free to look after the music. For me, the SQ is a small, handy mixer with enormous possibilities. I love using this mixer on tour with bands, also SQ-5 is the heart of my mobile recording studio setup.”

Allen & Heath • www.allen-heath.com

Rowing World Championship • www.worldrowing.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

MS Church Expands with New Sanctuary, Audio System

Heritage Apostolic Church’s new sanctuary is covered by a sizable Fulcrum Acoustic line array system.
Heritage Apostolic Church built a new sanctuary, covered by a sizable Fulcrum Acoustic line array system.

Holly Springs, MS (November 30, 2020) — Heritage Apostolic Church in Holly Springs, MS recently built a new a new sanctuary for its growing congregation, opting for an open two-story space with tiered seating along the stairways on either side. Covering then entire space is a new Fulcrum Acoustic line array as part of a larger system designed and installed by Simon Productions

The acoustically complex room features stairways that lead to a small balcony wrapping around the back of the room with two rows of seating. That’s not to say that concerns about acoustics were thrown to the wind; when designing the church, room geometries were developed to reduce standing waves, and padded chairs and carpeting were chosen to help reduce reverberation.

Nonetheless, there were multiple levels of seating and a large, open space that would require strict pattern control to concentrate sound on the congregation. Also, the location and shallow depth of the altar required broad band directional control to keep sound energy off the altar.

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Terry Stewart from Simon Productions flew 16 Fulcrum Acoustic FL283T Dual 8″ subcardioid line array modules in two separate arrays of eight on either side of the altar as the main loudspeakers. The FL283T provides the throw and tight vertical dispersion needed to distribute uniform coverage to the floor, stairway, and balcony seats without energizing the full vertical expanse of the space. Meanwhile, FW15 coaxial cardioid stage monitors were selected for use on the altar.

Stewart installed four of Fulcrum’s US221-2 Dual 21″ direct radiating subwoofers directly into the front of the altar in their own insulated wall niches; two of the US221-2s were coupled in the center of the room while the other two were deployed on either side.

Also part of the house system is an Allen & Heath Avantis console, and the various loudspeaker systems are powered by Linea Research amplifiers.

“We are absolutely thrilled with the sound of this Fulcrum system” said Pastor Kyle Flowers. “We had lots of guests from different churches that came to be with us for our first service and everyone was remarking on the clarity and high quality.”

Fulcrum Acoustic • https://www.fulcrum-acoustic.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

VF Live: Nabihah Iqbal

Uplifting reggae records from her London HQ.

In VF Live, our favourite collectors take you inside their homes, record shops, and studios, for intimate mixes and performances.

Artist, DJ, and producer Nabihah Iqbal plays her first VF Live set from her London HQ, with sonic sunshine tunes:

“This is a selection of some of my favourite reggae records – I decided on that theme because I’ve been listening to a lot of reggae recently. The music gets inside your body and makes you feel good, and it provides a nice contrast to the doom and gloom of this wintery lockdown!”

Watch and listen to the set above, check out the tracklist below.

1. Motion – Walk On By
2. The Capital Letters – Smokin’ My Ganja
3. Mikey Mao Chung – Work All Day
4. Dennis Brown – Money In My Pocket
5. Wailing Soul – Back Out
6. Al Campbell – Have You Been Making Out OK?
7. Errol Dunkley – Movie Star
8. Lennie Hibbert – Chinese Beauty
9. Tinga Stewart – Simple Beautiful
10. Cedric Brooks – Songbird
11. Mike Brooks – On The Ice
12. Count Ossie Band – Ethiopian Kingdom
13. Gregory Isaacs – Poor and Clean
14. Fabian – Prophecy
15. Steel Pulse – Tightrope
16. Bob Marley and the Wailers – Get Up Stand Up

Original Resource is The Vinyl Factory

VF Live: The Other Records #2 with Kyle Russoux

With downtempo, house, and broken beat records from the Cape Town shop.

In VF Live, our favourite collectors take you inside their homes, record shops, and studios, for intimate mixes and performances.

For Cape Town shop The Other Records’ second VF Live set, Kyle Russoux plays downtempo, house, and broken beat – featuring music from St Germain, Scott Grooves, Hanna, Kai Alice, and Dego & 2000 Black Family.

Watch and listen to the set above, check out the tracklist below.

Tracklist:

1. St Germain – Sure Thing
2. Spirit Level featuring Lorraine Chambers – Good Feeling
3. Soel – My Singing Soul
4. Scott Groves – Mono Waltz – 3/4 Part
5. Hanna – Punk
6. Chicagodeep – Kinetic Energy
7. Future Sound Of London – While Others Cry
8. Various Artists – White Label
9. Kai Alice – Quiet Revenge
10. Dego & 2000 Black Family – The Way It Should Be

Original Resource is The Vinyl Factory

Louisiana Phil Streams Through Rupert Neve Preamps

Mischa Kachkachishvili used a remote setup of 32 channels of Rupert Neve Designs’ class-A RMP-D8 preamplifiers to record the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra.
Mischa Kachkachishvili used a remote setup of 32 channels of Rupert Neve Designs’ class-A RMP-D8 preamplifiers to record the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra.

New Orleans, LA (November 13, 2020)—Mischa Kachkachishvili, owner of Esplanade Studios, opted to use a remote setup of 32 channels of Rupert Neve Designs’ class-A RMP-D8 Dante-connected microphone preamplifiers when tasked with recording the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra’s virtual season during the coronavirus pandemic.

Given the performance restrictions of 2020, the current season of the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra is being presented virtually this year and is available to stream on demand. For the first week of sessions, Kachkachishvili initially assembled a massive rig consisting of 24 channels of Rupert Neve Designs Shelford 5052 microphone preamplifiers, which normally occupy slots in his studio’s 48-channel RND 5088 console, coupled with an Apogee Symphony mk1.

“The gain, sound and EQ of the 5052 is fantastic, but it’s a [hassle] to take modules from the console, rack and install them in remote cases. Plus, all the downtime of doing that and extra cabling — I was losing an entire work day just doing that. The week after, I switched to the RMP-D8s,” he says.

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“At first, I was a little skeptical,” he reports, “but the system is super stable, and I’m so happy with the flexibility of the RMP-D8s, and the sound difference is almost negligible between my two setups. Even better, I’m enjoying the extra clarity that the RMP-D8 converters are adding to my recordings. There’s extra air — not brightness — that the RMP-D8 converters have delivered.”

Microphones used for the sessions include four Neumann M150s for room back and front, Neumann KM84s, KM86s, U87s, and Schoeps CMC-6-Us with various capsules. The RMP-D8s are controlled by a Focusrite RedNet HD32R and clocked by an Apogee Big Ben at 96 kHz.

“The system is very stable and allows me to record eight or more hours straight to a 12-core Mac Pro via HDX card. It sounds big and open, with plenty of low end and smooth, ‘analog’ highs, and very quiet. Ideal for classical music and film scoring. I love the sound.”

Rupert Neve Designs • www.rupertneve.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com