Tag Archives: Gear and Technology

New Studio Microphone Wrap-Up : Fall 2020

Studio Microphone Wrap-Up, Fall 2020
Sift through our Studio Microphone Wrap-Up, Fall 2020, to see the latest offerings for recordists of all levels.

Recording microphones have been flying off the shelves at retail all year, but that hasn’t stopped pro-audio manufacturers from introducing a new studio microphone every few weeks this Fall. Some are high-end products aimed at the upper echelons of the recording world, while others are intended for down-and-dirty use in home studios, but they’re all worth finding out about, because every new mic is a potential new tonal flavor for your sonic stew. Sift through our ICYMI rundown of new mics from the last six months and see what’s new!

 

Aston Element Microphone

Aston Element
Aston Element

Aston Microphones has clearly had a blast this year developing its new Aston Element by having potential users vote on sound samples to determine the way the microphone would ultimately sound. The Element incorporates new capsule technology, a new chassis design, a magnetic pop filter and custom shock mount, and a backlit-LED logo 48V phantom power indicator. According to Aston, the studio microphone has been rated by NTi Audio as the world’s quietest mic and the frequency response, which extends far below 20Hz and above 20kHz, as the widest of any electromagnetic microphone.

Aston Microphones • www.astonmics.com

 

Audio-Technica Limited-Edition AT2020 Mics

Audio-Technica Limited-Edition AT2020 Mics
Audio-Technica Limited-Edition AT2020 Mics

Audio-Technica has released new limited-edition AT2020 Series microphones—the AT2020V (standard) and the AT2020USB+V (USB model), each featuring a reflective silver finish. The side-address condensers are equipped with low-mass diaphragms custom-engineered for extended frequency response and transient response. The mics’ cardioid polar pattern reduces pickup of sounds from the sides and rear, improving isolation of desired sound source. All models in the AT2020 mic line are aimed to provide a wide dynamic range and handle high SPLs. Both of the limited-edition V models come with AT8458a shock mounts to attenuate noise, shock, or vibration transmitted through a mic stand, boom or mount.

Audio-Technica • www.audio-technica.com

 

Avantone Pro Kick Drum Mic

Avantone Pro Kick Drum Mic
Avantone Pro Kick Drum Mic

Aiming to help drummers capture the ultra-low end of their sound, Avantone Pro has introduced Kick, a sub-frequency kick drum microphone that aims to capture the subsonic signature by using a low-frequency driver. The AV-10 MLF sports a single continuous press-formed cone, and in the Kick’s case, the 18 cm cone acts as a microphone element. The microphone itself is of a moving coil dynamic type, with a 50 Hz to 2 kHz frequency response, 6.3 Ω output impedance and figure-eight pattern, plus a male XLR connector.

Avantone • http://www.avantonepro.com

 

Beyerdynamic TG D70 and TG 151 Mics

Beyerdynamic TG D70 and TG 151 Mics
Beyerdynamic TG D70 (left) and TG 151 Mics

Beyerdynamic has introduced two new additions to its TG series. The second-generation TG D70 dynamic kickdrum mic is meant for capturing the impact of bass drums and similar low-frequency intensive instruments, while the TG 151 instrument mic is a lean microphone with a short shaft that can be used on everything from snares and toms to brass instruments and guitar amplifiers.

Beyerdynamic • www.beyerdynamic.com

 

IsoVox IsoMic Studio Microphone

 IsoVox IsoMic Studio Microphone
IsoVox IsoMic Studio Microphone

Swedish audio manufacturer IsoVox has introduced IsoMic, a new studio microphone created in conjunction with fellow Swedish company Research Electronics AB, owners of the Ehrlund Microphones brand. The new microphone is based around a triangular capsule with a 7 Hz to 87 kHz frequency range. The IsoMic itself features an aluminum body with glass bead-blasting finish. Its triangular capsule reportedly has a SNR (Signal-to-Noise Ratio) of 87 dBA, DR (Dynamic Range) of 115 dB, and a maximum SPL (Sound Pressure Level) peak performance of 0.5% THD (Total Harmonic Distortion) at 116 dB or 1% THD at 122 dB.

IsoVox • www.isovoxbooth.com

 

MXL Microphones Revelation Mini FET

MXL Microphones Revelation Mini FET
MXL Microphones Revelation Mini FET

Hot on the heels of introducing its Revelation II studio microphone in the Spring, MXL Microphones has launched its new Revelation Mini FET, aiming to provide intimacy and warmth of a tube mic, but built around a FET circuit with a smaller footprint. MXL’s Revelation Mini FET utilizes a 32 mm center terminating, gold-sputtered capsule combined with a low noise circuit. The mic focuses on the midrange and lower frequencies, resulting in recordings with less hum and more music. Additionally, the inclusion of a three-stage pad (0, -10 dB, -20 dB) is intended to provide the flexibility needed for recording high SPL sources, such as horns and kickdrums. The mic features black chrome accents as well as hand-selected FET and capacitors

MXL • www.mxlmics.com

Sanken CUX-100K Microphone

Sanken CUX-100K Microphone
Sanken CUX-100K Microphone

First announced earlier in the year, Sanken Microphones is now shipping its new CUX-100K Cardioid or Omnidirectional super wide range professional microphone. The new microphone builds on the history of the company’s Chromatic omni-mode CO-100K, adding the ability to change modes with three settings: Cardioid (Far), Cardioid (Near) and Omni modes. The CUX-100K is intended for a variety of high-resolution, high-sample rate recordings, both in spatial or close-miking applications.

Sanken • www.sankenchromatic.com

How To Choose Your Next Studio Microphone – The Complete Guide

Scope Labs Periscope Microphone

Scope Labs Periscope Microphone
Scope Labs Periscope Microphone

Scope Labs, a new pro-audio manufacturer based in Finland and operating globally, has introduced its first mic, the Periscope Microphone — an omni-condenser microphone with a built-in compressor that gives the mic a unique character. The Periscope is based around an omni capsule followed by a compression circuit intended to highlight textural nuances that the mic captures, with the aim of providing a hyper-realistic sound. The Periscope is manufactured in-house at Scope Labs Ltd. in Finland.

Scope Labs • www.scopelabs.eu

 

Sennheiser MD 435 and MD 445 Vocal Microphones

Sennheiser MD 435 and MD 445 Vocal Microphones
Sennheiser MD 435, MD 445

Sennheiser has introduced two new vocal microphones—the MD 435 large-diaphragm microphone, bringing the company’s dynamic MD 9235 capsule to a wired vocal microphone for the first time; and the MD 445, an LDC with a tight super-cardioid pick pattern. Ostensibly intended for live sound use, they reportedly hold their own in the studio as well. The MD 435’s lightweight aluminum-copper voice coil is intended to provide fast transient response, according to Sennheiser, in an effort to provide detailed, transparent sound. The large-diaphragm microphone features dynamics of 146 dB(A) and can handle sound pressure levels of up to 163 dB/1 kHz. The MD 445 is designed with a high-rejection, super-cardioid pick-up pattern, it reportedly offers uses considerable gain before feedback. Dynamics are wide at 146 dB(A) and the microphone is said to be able to handle sound pressure levels of up to 163 dB/1 kHz.

Sennheiser • www.sennheiser.com

 

Telefunken TF11 Microphone

Telefunken TF11 Microphone
Telefunken TF11 Microphone NICHOLAS SONSINI

The TF11 is the company’s first large diaphragm phantom-powered condenser mic. The CK12-style edge-terminated capsule is a single membrane version of the capsule featured in the TF51, and the amplifier is a proprietary take on the FET mic amplifier similar to the M60, coupled with a custom large format nickel-iron core transformer by OEP/Carnhill made in the UK. The mic’s through-hole components include UK-made polystyrene film capacitors, Nichicon Fine Gold electrolytic capacitors, and a high-performance, ultra-low-noise JFET amplifier.

Telefunken Elektroakustik • www.telefunken-elektroakustik.com

 

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Podcave Podcast Production Management Platform Debuts

Podcave Podcast Production Management Platform
Podcave Podcast Production Management Platform

Los Angeles, CA (November 19, 2020)—Radio industry veteran Brad Noble has launched Podcave, an all-in-one podcasting management and publishing platform, intended to support users through every step of podcasting, from show planning and guest booking, to publishing and promotion.

PodcaveUsing SaaS technology to provide professional tools and structure on a single platform, Podcast offers audio hosting powered in the background by OmnyStudio with included IAB-certified analytics. Elsewhere in the software is a complete episode planning suite that includes guest management, a segment planner, a music library (powered by radio imaging company Benztown), a trending topic/source finder, and a‘Record Assist’ focus mode for while users are recording an episode.

An internal promotion engine includes scheduling social media, notifying guests of their episode release, email marketing and text/SMS marketing. Users also gert a stable, customizable (including custom domain) website powered by PodcastPage.io. Podcave also offers a 30-day free trial.

Shure Launches MV7 Hybrid XLR/USB Podcast Mic

Podcave’s founding team consists of radio veteran Brad Nolan, who has created radio shows now heard in hundreds of cities, and coached talent at the highest levels of radio broadcasting. John Michael has worked at some of the most influential radio stations in the US, including KROQ, JACK-FM, and AMP Radio in Los Angeles. Nikki Noble has managed online communities in the thousands, ran operations for major companies, and spearheads Podcave’s women in podcasting and social responsibility initiatives.

Podcave • www.podcave.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

iCON Pro Audio Debuts Duo44 Live USB Audio Interface

iCON Pro Audio Duo44 Live
iCON Pro Audio Duo44 Live USB Audio Interface

Nashville, TN (November 19, 2020)—iCON Pro Audio has released its new Duo44 Live portable recording interface, intended for podcasting, home recording, live streaming applications and more.

The Duo44 Live is a four-input/four-output USB recording interface allowing  full duplex simultaneous recording and playback. There are dual mic/instrument preamps accessed via front panel-positioned hybrid connectors (it accepts a standard three-pin XLR plug or a quarter-inch balanced TS connector) alongside potentiometers to control the input level of each of the associated analogue microphone/instrument inputs, while the rear panel also includes MIDI I/O on standard five-pin DIN connectors.

PreSonus Revelator USB Mic Debuts

A Master level potentiometer (to control the master output level of the analogue outputs) is available on the front panel, while the topside-sited singular Monitor knob allows for direct monitoring when turned clockwise and ‘computer’ monitoring (complete with effects while recording by using low-latency ASIO monitoring) when turned anti-clockwise. The unit sports DA/AD convertors delivering 114 dB dynamic range and provides 24-bit/192 kHz conversions.

The Duo44 Live is equipped with a +5V DC power supply connector, enabling external power to be supplied when working with a USB-connected iPad, for example, so no need, necessarily, to work with a computer-hosted DAW (Digital Audio Workstation). But beyond that, iCON Pro Audio’s (Windows-only) proprietary ProDriver 4 software lets users redirect audio from any source on their computer and also hosts VST or DirectX plug-ins without a DAW.

iCON Pro Audio’s Duo44 Live is available at $169.99 USD.

iCON Pro Audio • https://iconproaudio.com

 

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Innovations: NTP Technologies Penta 721s-DNT

NTP Technologies Penta 721s-DNT
NTP Technologies Penta 721s-DNT

Dante audio-over-IP technology has been widely adopted in live sound, broadcast and studio environments. As Dante networks become bigger and start integrating many different types of applications including live sound, broadcast, intercom, P.A., recording and so on, it can be a challenge to match clocking and sample rates.

This challenge can be solved with the new Penta 721s – DNT from NTP Technology, which provides two separate Dante interfaces. The built-in sample rate converter makes it possible to interconnect two Dante networks with different clock sources and/or sample rates. However, the Penta 721s – DNT offers much more than that.

The Penta 721s – DNT is based on the Penta 721s base unit. As standard, the Penta 721s features a 64-channel Dante interface, one coax MADI I/O and eight AES I/O. Further, two MADI I/O, optical or coax, can be added as options. All of these are synchronized to the same clock.

Innovations: Flock Audio PATCH System

The Penta 721s includes a slot where an optional I/O card can be installed. This can be a 128-channel Dante card, a dual MADI I/O card, an eight-channel AES I/O card, a dual SDI embedder/ de-embedder card, an eight-channel analog input card or an eight-channel analog output card. This makes the Penta 721s suitable for a wide range of applications, including conversion between multiple formats.

In the case of the Penta 721s – DNT, the option slot is configured with the 128-channel Dante card, which provides 128 Dante channels at 48 kHz, 64 channels at 96 kHz or 32 channels at 192 kHz. Apart from the high channel count, it also boasts a low-latency sample rate converter, which is used to adapt the clocking and/or sample rate of the Dante interface to the clock and/or sample rate of the Penta 721s base unit.

There is a routing matrix between the main and the option sections that allows the user to patch any input channel to any output channel, and even to multiple outputs simultaneously. The routing matrix includes a 256 x 32 summing engine. This combination allows the user to take, for example, a 96 kHz Dante channel on the option card, samplerate convert it to 48 kHz, and output it on the Dante and MADI interfaces of the base unit, and vice versa.

 

LIVE SOUND: A common issue in live sound is that some desks use 48 kHz sample rate, while others use 96 kHz; the Penta 721s – DNT provides an easy way of interconnecting these. The option section is connected to the 96 kHz desk with up to 64 channels, while the 48 kHz desk is then connected to the main section, either via Dante or MADI, with up to 64 channels. The routing between the main and secondary section is then set up, and even allows the channel sequence to be reordered. Because of the sample rate converter in the Penta 721s – DNT, the two sides do not even need to be synchronized.

 

RECORDING STUDIO: Recording studios can also benefit from the Penta 721s – DNT. Many recording studios use Dantebased personal monitoring systems. Some personal monitoring systems only operate at 48 kHz, for example, making it difficult—if not impossible— to record at other sample rates. And even if the personal monitoring system supports other sample rates, it can be cumbersome to change the sample rate of all Dante devices.

Inserting the Penta 721s – DNT between the recording converter and the personal monitor system provides a separation between the recording sample rate and the sample rate of the personal monitoring system. This allows the recording to be changed at any time without having to worry about the sample rate of the personal monitor system. In short, it provides a quick and efficient way of interconnecting Dante networks with different clocking and/or sample rates.

NTP Technology North America • www.ntp-us.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Sennheiser Launches MD 435 and MD 445 Vocal Microphones

Sennheiser MD 435 Vocal Mic
Sennheiser MD 445 and MD 435 Vocal Mics.

Wedemark, Germany (November 17, 2020)—Sennheiser has introduced two new vocal microphones—the MD 435 large-diaphragm microphone, bringing the company’s dynamic MD 9235 capsule to a wired vocal microphone for the first time; and the MD 445, an LDC with a tight super-cardioid pick pattern.

The MD 435’s lightweight aluminum-copper voice coil is intended to provide fast transient response, according to Sennheiser, in an effort to provide detailed, transparent sound. The large-diaphragm microphone features dynamics of 146 dB(A) and can handle sound pressure levels of up to 163 dB/1 kHz.

How to Pick the Right Mic to Record a Vocalist

Meanwhile, the MD 445 is designed for use in a large, loud, live sound atmosphere. With a high-rejection, super-cardioid pick-up pattern, it reportedly offers uses considerable gain before feedback. Dynamics are wide at 146 dB(A) and the microphone is said to be able to handle sound pressure levels of up to 163 dB/1 kHz. It also features a metal casing and has a shock-mounted capsule, while a hum-compensating coil protects the microphone against electromagnetic interference.

For use with Sennheiser’s wireless transmitters, the capsule of the MD 435 is also available as the MM 435 microphone head, and will soon replace the existing MD 9235 capsule. Likewise, the capsule of the MD 445 is also available as the MM 445 microphone head. Both capsules can be used with Sennheiser wireless series ranging from the evolution wireless G4 and 2000 series to Digital 6000 and Digital 9000.

The MD 435 microphone and MM 435 microphone head retail at EUR 499 (roughly $591 US) each, while the MD 445 microphone and MM 445 microphone head retail at USD $619 each.

Sennheiser • www.sennheiser.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Scope Labs Raises New Periscope Microphone

Scope Labs' Periscope
Marco Melander

Helsinki, Finland (November 17, 2020)—Scope Labs, a new pro-audio manufacturer based in Finland and operating globally, has introduced its first microphone, the Periscope Microphone — an omni- condenser microphone with a built-in compressor that gives the mic a unique character.

The Periscope is based around an omni capsule followed by a compression circuit intended to highlight textural nuances that the mic captures, with the aim of providing a hyper-realistic sound. The Periscope is manufactured in-house at Scope Labs Ltd. in Finland.

Scope Labs Periscope Microphone
Scope Labs Periscope Microphone

Mattia Sartori, co-founder of Scope Labs, noted, “For years, microphone manufacturers have been looking for the most pristine sound, we have our mic lockers full of supposed-to-be-perfect pieces. They can tell us exactly how an instrument sounds, but often they cannot capture the vibe, they cannot tell us the story behind it. That’s why we need new unique tools with character and that’s exactly what the Periscope delivers.”

How To Choose Your Next Studio Microphone – The Complete Guide

Paavo Kurkela, co-founder of Scope Labs, stated, “Our mic is not a clone. It’s a brand-new design developed from the ground up, taking inspiration from tools and techniques that have been used for decades, but that are only now available in a sleek and simple plug-n-play form. Just hook up the mic in front of the source, switch phantom power on and you’re all set…. The obvious question for many is why would you compress or distort a microphone? Because we can, it’s unconventional, and it sounds super cool.”

Beta testers for the Periscope Microphone have included electronic music pioneers Chemical Brothers,   producer   Butch   Vig (Nirvana, Garbage, Foo Fighters), engineer Ricky Damian (Mark Ronson, Lady Gaga) and others. Vig noted, “When I’m looking for character and color, The Periscope is my new go-to microphone…. If you’re looking for instant vibe, the Periscope rocks.

Scope Labs • www.scopelabs.eu

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

REAL-WORLD REVIEW: Avid Pro Tools Carbon Production System

Avid’s new Pro Tools Carbon is a hybrid audio production system based around a hardware interface with onboard HDX DSP acceleration that works in conjunction with your native computer’s CPU.
Avid’s new Pro Tools Carbon is a hybrid audio production system based around a hardware interface with onboard HDX DSP acceleration that works in conjunction with your native computer’s CPU. Mike Taylor

I can honestly say that Pro Tools is a vital tool in my daily workflow, so when Avid sent an advance unit of Pro Tools Carbon my way, I was anxious to put it through its paces and see what it could do on some real-world sessions.

Avid’s Pro Tools Carbon is a new hybrid audio production system starting at $3,999 that combines a hardware interface with onboard HDX DSP acceleration and your native computer’s CPU power. With this Hybrid Engine, you can track and monitor with near-zero latency when using AAX DSP plug-ins. Intelligently, when you put a track into DSP Mode for recording, the chips in Carbon process the AAX DSP plug-ins while the computer plays back your mix in Native mode. Simply switch off the tracks in DSP Mode and the whole session is back in Native Mode, ready for mixdown.

Let’s take a quick look at the Carbon hardware, then get into how it all works together. The sleek 25×34 simultaneous I/O, 19-inch, 1U rack-mountable interface features two variable Z, unbalanced, ¼-inch TS instrument inputs on the front, as well as four separate stereo headphone outputs. There are eight 20 Hz to 20 kHz XLR Mic/Line preamps on the rear (four of which have Variable Impedance), as well as eight channel Line In and Line Out DB25 25-pin D Sub multipin connections. There’s a TRS Monitor L/R Main output, ¼-inch footswitch connector for talkback on/off, WC I/O and two Ethernet connectors. Also on the rear are a pair of ADAT optical inputs and two ADAT optical outputs, offering 16 channels at 44.1 – 96 kHz and eight channels at 176.4 – 192 kHz.

Avid Launches Pro Tools | Carbon

Back to the front panel—you’ve got eight separate LED meters for the Mic/Line inputs and a Main L/R stereo out meter. Input levels are controlled with the Input Encoder knob on the left, which, when pressed, switches between Mic/Line, as instrument input is automatically detected. The Input Level Strip displays input source and amount of gain.

There are buttons for Input Selection, Z for impedance choices, Link, Phase, Phantom Power, Input Metering, Integrated Talkback, Output Metering and another knob for main output and headphone levels, as well as a master Mute button, Headphone button and DIM button. EXT or NET indicators light up on the front when properly connected to their source. The Output Encoder knob controls headphone and monitor (Main/Alt 1/Alt 2) out, indicated with the Level Strip above it.

Under the hood lies the all-important eight HDX DSP processors (2.8 GHz aggregated processing), which allow all of this hybrid production to take place. Note that at launch, all preamp and monitor controls will be from the front panel, but remote control is at the ‘top of the list’ for the upcoming updates.

Since I do production and TV composing from my own studio and in a variety of locations, I have long used my own ‘hybrid’ system of recording. I go ‘Native’ with my mobile rigs, based primarily around a MacBook Pro and several interfaces, and ‘combo’ on my main HDX system, with an HD I/O hooked up to a MacPro. It works, but Native-only production tends to frustrate me with latency and buffer sizes and so on.

That’s why Carbon is a different animal. To integrate it into my system, I simply connected an RJ 45 Ethernet cable from Carbon to my MacPro and selected it in the Network Device Browser on the computer. I then hooked up both the Main L/R outputs and ADAT output 1 into my Grace Design M906 Monitor controller. Since I run a lot of guitar-centric gear and pedal boards into my Manley, Millennia and Universal Audio preamps, they connected via a DB25 to the analog input on the rear of Carbon. My Grace Design m108 8-channel preamp connected via ADAT optical input 1 and now shows up on ADAT 1 of the Input Tab in the I/O setup.

Pro Tools | Carbon
Avid Pro Tools | Carbon

Literally within a few minutes, everything was connected and simply worked. It was remarkably seamless and since it’s connected via AVB Ethernet, you not only get 32-bit end-to-end workflow, but your regular computer audio will play back directly through the converters of Carbon.

Top Guitar Miking Tips—How to Capture a Roaring Guitar Amp

With Carbon, it’s all about DSP Mode. Each track has the ability to switch from Native to DSP Mode, which can be enabled for Audio, Aux, Instrument, Routing Folder and Master Fader Tracks. When selected, the small ‘lightning bolt’ icon turns from gray to bright green and all plug-ins on the track switch from Native to DSP (if a DSP equivalent is available). DSP Compatible plug-ins are identified with a DSP Compatible badge.

At this point, the entire signal path for the track will then run on the HDX DSP mixer in Carbon. Any Native-only plug-ins will be automatically bypassed in DSP Mode. What’s cool is that any tracks associated with a track put into DSP Mode (light green lightning bolt) are automatically also put into DSP Mode (dark green lightning bolt). This would include tracks being bussed to downstream (subgroups, routing folders), as well as effect return tracks from sends.  For effect returns, if a plug in does not have a DSP equivalent, the track can be placed in DSP Mode Safe. This places the track back onto the native mixer with a slight predelay. Note that you can also set DSP Mode to enable automatically when putting a track into record, and you can also set tracks into DSP Mode Safe to prevent DSP Mode from being auto-enabled.

So what this all means is that I was able to track my guitars through DSP plug-ins and some of my favorite effects with virtually zero latency, which is the only way to get that “feel.” Note that you can also use Aux tracks to put external reverbs, delays, etc. that have no DSP equivalent, into DSP Mode Safe. The main record tracks are running DSP with sub ms latency, but the reverb return is still on the Native mixer live, so your playback buffer is still relevant to the plug-in. This all adds up to me using Pro Tools for what it’s for—seamless creativity without technology getting in the way. Yes, it might require some forethought on DSP plug-ins, but it’s worth it.

Carbon is Mac-only at launch, with PC support hopefully added in the future. For those without Ethernet ports on your computer, you’ll need to use a qualified Thunderbolt-to-Ethernet adapter; check Avid’s website for compatibility data. Also, the computer has to be qualified with macOS 10.15.7.

Also included in the package are a one-year subscription to Pro Tools software with its 115 AAX plug-ins (more than 70 AAX DSP plugins), a 5.4 GB sound library and standard support, and there’s also an additional selection of partner plug-ins from Arturia, McDSP, Plugin Alliance, UVI, Native Instruments and Embody.

Essentially, in one hybrid system, Pro Tools Carbon lets users have the best of both worlds: AAX DSP and Native. Carbon is a creative game changer in a lot of ways, and I can’t wait to see—and hear—where this is going.

Rich Tozzoli is an award-winning, Grammy-nominated producer, engineer and composer for programming such as FOX NFL, Pawn Stars and Oprah & Deepak Chopra. www.richtozzoli.com

Avid • www.avid.com/carbon

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Avid Launches Pro Tools | Carbon

Pro Tools | Carbon
Avid Pro Tools | Carbon

Burlington, MA (November 12, 2020)—Avid has introduced Pro Tools | Carbon, a new hybrid audio production system intended to create an improved tracking experience as it integrates Pro Tools with HDX DSP acceleration and the native CPU of the user’s computer.

FIRST REAL-WORLD REVIEW: AVID PRO TOOLS | CARBON

Using Carbon’s onboard HDX DSP, the new Pro Tools Hybrid Engine simultaneously allows users to access on-demand, low-latency channels to record through AAX DSP plug-ins in real time—with sub-1 ms latency monitoring performance. Going between Native Mode and DSP Mode requires only a single button press per track in Pro Tools, allowing users to simplify their workflow for recording and mixing.

Pro Tools | Carbon

AAX DSP, at the core of the Hybrid Engine, delivers the same sound quality in both native and HDX DSP Acceleration domains, enabling users to toggle in and out of DSP Mode while maintaining sound quality. This also enables music creators to disconnect Carbon and physically take their mix elsewhere or collaborate with others who don’t have the interface.

Carbon features double resolution clocking, and what Avid says is its most transparent mic preamp design to date. With four headphone outputs to send individual monitor mixes, eight preamps combined with 16 channels of ADAT inputs and an onboard talkback mi, the unit can handle tracking a full band. Carbon requires an Ethernet connection to the host computer, aiming to preserve the highest possible sound quality from input to output, as well as ‘futureproof’ the unit.

In addition, Pro Tools 2020 introduces a much-requested ‘Dark Mode’-style UI, as well as a new ability to analyze audio and render it as MIDI notes. For audio post professionals, Pro Tools 2020 includes native integration to export ADM files for Dolby Atmos, a new space clips function that lets users arrange a multitude of clips in a fraction of the time, and a reintroduction of the ability to bounce sessions to QuickTime formats in macOS Catalina.

Pro Tools | Carbon is available now, starting at $3,999 USD—that includes a one-year Pro Tools subscription and partner plugins from Arturia, McDSP, Plugin Alliance, UVI, Native Instruments and Embody.

Pro Sound News reviewer, Rich Tozzoli, has put Carbon through its paces for weeks—don’t miss his Real-World Review for the full lowdown!

Avid • www.avid.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Stedman Squarely Adapts to Podcast Usage

Pop filter manufacturer Stedman has introduced a new adapter for square boom arms
Pop filter manufacturer Stedman has introduced a new adapter (left) for square boom arms

Richland, MI (November 11, 2020)—Studio accessory manufacturer Stedman Corporation has introduced its new AD-1 Clamp Adaptor.

The new adaptor attaches to the clamps of Stedman’s Proscreen XL and PS-101 pop filters to allow them to properly attach to square-tubed broadcast microphone boom arms that are a popular part of many podcast studios, such as the Rode PSA1 or the Heil Sound PL-2T.

How to Choose a Voiceover Microphone
How To Choose Your Next Studio Microphone – The Complete Guide

Stedman’s pop filter clamps were originally designed to work only with circular microphone stands and boom arms. This adaptor will allow the PS-XL and PS-101 to be used with any square boom arm with a width of up to 0.65”.

The AD-1 has a retail price of $5.99 USD. All Stedman products are handmade in the U.S. and are backed by a limited lifetime warranty.

Stedman • www.stedmanusa.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Blackmagic Design Expands Fairlight Line

Fairlight Desktop Console
Fairlight Desktop Console

Fremont, CA (November 11, 2020)—Blackmagic Design has launched a new 12-fader Fairlight Desktop Console with integrated HDMI interface.

The Fairlight Desktop Console, available in December, is intended for new users, smaller studios, commercials, online and independent work, according to the manufacturer. It features a familiar mixer design with 12 motorized faders, control knobs and illuminated buttons for channel identification. The built-in HDMI output lets customers connect a display, giving them the same interactive graphical feedback of audio status and metering as larger Fairlight consoles.

The surface includes transport buttons and a jog shuttle wheel, enabling users to move around the timeline and navigate clips, scrub, start or stop playback, or jump to a new position. The controls are logically grouped, says the company, allowing the user to keep a hand in one position to quickly navigate the timeline from end to end or anywhere in between. The search dial can also be used for timeline zooming, clip levels and more.

Blackmagic Update Offers Audio Enhancements

By default, the console works in Strip Mode, giving customers one channel strip per track. Focus Mode lets customers assign all of the select buttons and knobs on the console to work on the parameters or plug-ins for a single track.

Customers can add an HDMI display to see an extensive graphical display of everything happening on the console without having to open pop-up windows on top of their timeline. For example, when customers adjust EQ settings, its interface will be displayed on the screen as customers turn the knob.

Fairlight HDMI monitor interface
Fairlight HDMI monitor interface

Blackmagic Design also announced a new Fairlight HDMI monitor interface that lets customers use any HDMI or SDI television or computer monitor with the large Fairlight Studio Consoles.

“Fairlight LCD monitors have a graphics processing engine built-in,” said Grant Petty, Blackmagic Design’s CEO, “so it means you cannot simply swap out the monitor with a custom monitor. However, now we have taken the graphics processor and packaged it into a low-cost converter that customers can use with any display.”

Blackmagic Design • www.blackmagicdesign.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com