Tag Archives: Beyerdynamic

The Pro Sound News Holiday Gift Guide 2020

PSN Gift Guide 2020

Coming off of what could easily be described as the craziest year in my lifetime, the holidays will hopefully give us all an escape from the current Covid-19 reality. And to help the escape be even more successful, dig into our latest holiday gift guide — you’ll find a host of great new products (and a couple of older ones) that can make for the perfect gift for your favorite producer, engineer or musician.

Every Pro Sound News Holiday Gift Guide Ever!
Earthworks Audio ICON USB mic
Earthworks Audio ICON USB mic

USB mics are a dime a dozen these days and the majority of them feel (and sadly sound) like they are disposable. Not true with the Earthworks Audio ICON USB mic (www.earthworksaudio.com); this thing is made to last a lifetime. If there’s a USB mic whose look, feel and performance can be compared to driving a Ferrari, the ICON is it! The mic has a built-in pop filter, looks fantastic on camera and incorporates the legendary low-noise, non-colored, musical sound that has made Earthworks famous. The cardioid mic has a 20 Hz – 20 kHz frequency response, and after spending time recording with it, I found that besides voice, it beautifully captures virtually any instrument or sound source.

To top it off, the mic includes a custom Triad-Orbit base, and based on its impressive specs, you’d be hard pressed to think you weren’t recording with a high-dollar studio microphone rather than an affordable USB mic. Speaking of the studio, I should mention that there is also an ICON PRO studio version of the mic, equipped with an XLR connector rather than a USB port.

pro audio gift guide - Sonic Presence SP15 USB-C Spatial Microphone
Sonic Presence SP15 USB-C Spatial Microphone

At only $149, the Sonic Presence SP15 USB-C Spatial Microphone (www.sonicpresence.com) is absolutely the best way to capture stereo recordings, and using it is a complete blast. I fell in love with the first version of the Sonic Presence mic a couple of years ago and the current USB-C version is as close to perfect as imaginable. The stereo microphone set incorporates two small, omnidirectional mics that hang over your ears, sitting just in front of the ear canal so you can still use AirPods or IEMs for monitoring if desired. The Sonic Presence website has recommended apps depending on the desired quality, as the mic supports 24-bit/96 kHz. I’ve loved recording with the mic and it’s discrete enough to easily sneak into a concert (don’t tell anyone I said that, though). The SP15 is compatible with Android, Windows, USB-C equipped iOS devices and Mac OS. The mic can be used with USB-A computers by utilizing a USB-C to USB-A adapter cable.

pro audio gift guide - AcoustiTools
AcoustiTools

AcoustiTools from Acoustic Masterminds (www.acousticmasterminds.com) is an awesome iOS audio analysis app. The $24.99 module-based app allows four modules to be viewed and utilized simultaneously. Modules bundled with the basic application include Augmented Reality (allows the user to tag specific locations in an acoustic space and calculate the volume level, distance and delay for each tag), dB Meter and Real-Time Analyzer modules.

The RTA module looks fantastic and can be switched between spectrum color and solid blue displays; it includes a red problem frequency line that allows you to instantly find a problem frequency that has a tendency to feedback. The Diagnostic PEQ and Diagnostic GEQ are accessed via in-app purchases and each cost $14.99. The Diagnostic PEQ uses an innovative, real-time Diagnostic Parametric Equalizer module to analyze pink noise played through a system and then recommends a corrective parametric EQ setting for the system. The Diagnostic GEQ is essentially the same feature, but it recommends a corrective graphic EQ setting for the system rather than a parametric setting. The number of bands in the software is adjustable, so it can be set to match the number of bands on the system’s GEQ.  Besides configuring a space for sound reinforcement, this feature is also great for setting up a home theater or tweaking a car stereo.

UE SWITCH
UE SWITCH

In-ear monitors have become as much of a fashion statement as a tool for many artists and musicians. Ultimate Ears (www.ultimateears.com) was at the forefront of allowing users to customize the look of their IEMs, and now the new UE SWITCH system takes customization one-step further by allowing users to swap out custom-designed faceplates, providing unlimited visual options. SWITCH-equipped IEMs look identical to previous models, but their face plates are easily removed and replaced by using the SWITCH’s simple twist-lock mechanism and simply rotating the faceplate, removing it and replacing it with another in seconds.

The new interchangeable faceplates are just like the current faceplates, except for the twist-lock mount on the back. The SWITCH faceplates can incorporate any of the faceplate colors, materials and design options offered with standard IEMs. The UE SWITCH option includes three Faceplates and is available with any new UE Pro or CSX model for $199. The UE SWITCH upgrade is available for any existing UE Pro or CSX model for $199. This upgrade includes a three pack of faceplates.

Beyerdynamic TG D70 and TG I51

Beyerdynamic (www.beyerdynamic.com) has a pair of useful new mics that are worth checking out. The TG D70 utilizes the legendary M88 capsule and is designed specifically for kick drum, and it works extremely well for that purpose. It’s quite versatile as well, as I had good results using it on floor tom, bass and guitar cabinets, and trombone. Meanwhile, the TG I51 is an amazingly affordable workhorse microphone that lends itself to electric guitars, but also sounds great on snare, toms and bass guitar. Both mics are well made, include a carry bag and feature a built-in mounting system.

Patch & Tweak with Moog

Nothing beats a great book and there are a couple of fantastic ones that simply can’t be missed. Patch & Tweak with Moog (www.bjooks.com) is a beautifully designed book and a fantastic read. The book was written and designed by electronic musician Kim Bjørn and features a foreword by Hans Zimmer. The book covers a wide range of Moog synthesizer-oriented topics, including professional artist interviews, creative patch ideas, sound design tips, in-depth discussions with Moog engineers and an overview of Moog’s history.

There’s also a view of the Moog factory in Asheville, North Carolina which I’m fortunate to have visited multiple times. It truly is an amazing experience to see the precision and finesse that goes into building a synthesizer by hand, and if you can’t visit the factory in person, this book is the next best thing. Patch & Tweak with Moog is the ultimate studio coffee table book!

Sound Man: A Life Recording Hits with The Rolling Stones, The Who, Led Zeppelin, the Eagles, Eric Clapton, the Faces...

Sound Man: A Life Recording Hits with The Rolling Stones, The Who, Led Zeppelin, the Eagles, Eric Clapton, the Faces… by Glyn Johns (www.penguinrandomhouse.com) is a stunningly good read. The book sucks you in like a great novel, while secretly feeding you tons of wisdom in regards to producing, engineering and knowing how to interact with artists, managers and labels. I somehow missed the book when it was released in 2014 [It was in our Holiday Gift Guide that year! – Ed.], but thankfully superstar engineer Doug Sarrett turned me onto it last summer and I couldn’t be more grateful. Glyn Johns played a strong hand in the creation of many of my all-time favorite albums, and hearing the stories gives you a fly on the wall perspective as to what went into creating many of these masterpieces.

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

New Studio Microphone Wrap-Up : Fall 2020

Studio Microphone Wrap-Up, Fall 2020
Sift through our Studio Microphone Wrap-Up, Fall 2020, to see the latest offerings for recordists of all levels.

Recording microphones have been flying off the shelves at retail all year, but that hasn’t stopped pro-audio manufacturers from introducing a new studio microphone every few weeks this Fall. Some are high-end products aimed at the upper echelons of the recording world, while others are intended for down-and-dirty use in home studios, but they’re all worth finding out about, because every new mic is a potential new tonal flavor for your sonic stew. Sift through our ICYMI rundown of new mics from the last six months and see what’s new!

 

Aston Element Microphone

Aston Element
Aston Element

Aston Microphones has clearly had a blast this year developing its new Aston Element by having potential users vote on sound samples to determine the way the microphone would ultimately sound. The Element incorporates new capsule technology, a new chassis design, a magnetic pop filter and custom shock mount, and a backlit-LED logo 48V phantom power indicator. According to Aston, the studio microphone has been rated by NTi Audio as the world’s quietest mic and the frequency response, which extends far below 20Hz and above 20kHz, as the widest of any electromagnetic microphone.

Aston Microphones • www.astonmics.com

 

Audio-Technica Limited-Edition AT2020 Mics

Audio-Technica Limited-Edition AT2020 Mics
Audio-Technica Limited-Edition AT2020 Mics

Audio-Technica has released new limited-edition AT2020 Series microphones—the AT2020V (standard) and the AT2020USB+V (USB model), each featuring a reflective silver finish. The side-address condensers are equipped with low-mass diaphragms custom-engineered for extended frequency response and transient response. The mics’ cardioid polar pattern reduces pickup of sounds from the sides and rear, improving isolation of desired sound source. All models in the AT2020 mic line are aimed to provide a wide dynamic range and handle high SPLs. Both of the limited-edition V models come with AT8458a shock mounts to attenuate noise, shock, or vibration transmitted through a mic stand, boom or mount.

Audio-Technica • www.audio-technica.com

 

Avantone Pro Kick Drum Mic

Avantone Pro Kick Drum Mic
Avantone Pro Kick Drum Mic

Aiming to help drummers capture the ultra-low end of their sound, Avantone Pro has introduced Kick, a sub-frequency kick drum microphone that aims to capture the subsonic signature by using a low-frequency driver. The AV-10 MLF sports a single continuous press-formed cone, and in the Kick’s case, the 18 cm cone acts as a microphone element. The microphone itself is of a moving coil dynamic type, with a 50 Hz to 2 kHz frequency response, 6.3 Ω output impedance and figure-eight pattern, plus a male XLR connector.

Avantone • http://www.avantonepro.com

 

Beyerdynamic TG D70 and TG 151 Mics

Beyerdynamic TG D70 and TG 151 Mics
Beyerdynamic TG D70 (left) and TG 151 Mics

Beyerdynamic has introduced two new additions to its TG series. The second-generation TG D70 dynamic kickdrum mic is meant for capturing the impact of bass drums and similar low-frequency intensive instruments, while the TG 151 instrument mic is a lean microphone with a short shaft that can be used on everything from snares and toms to brass instruments and guitar amplifiers.

Beyerdynamic • www.beyerdynamic.com

 

IsoVox IsoMic Studio Microphone

 IsoVox IsoMic Studio Microphone
IsoVox IsoMic Studio Microphone

Swedish audio manufacturer IsoVox has introduced IsoMic, a new studio microphone created in conjunction with fellow Swedish company Research Electronics AB, owners of the Ehrlund Microphones brand. The new microphone is based around a triangular capsule with a 7 Hz to 87 kHz frequency range. The IsoMic itself features an aluminum body with glass bead-blasting finish. Its triangular capsule reportedly has a SNR (Signal-to-Noise Ratio) of 87 dBA, DR (Dynamic Range) of 115 dB, and a maximum SPL (Sound Pressure Level) peak performance of 0.5% THD (Total Harmonic Distortion) at 116 dB or 1% THD at 122 dB.

IsoVox • www.isovoxbooth.com

 

MXL Microphones Revelation Mini FET

MXL Microphones Revelation Mini FET
MXL Microphones Revelation Mini FET

Hot on the heels of introducing its Revelation II studio microphone in the Spring, MXL Microphones has launched its new Revelation Mini FET, aiming to provide intimacy and warmth of a tube mic, but built around a FET circuit with a smaller footprint. MXL’s Revelation Mini FET utilizes a 32 mm center terminating, gold-sputtered capsule combined with a low noise circuit. The mic focuses on the midrange and lower frequencies, resulting in recordings with less hum and more music. Additionally, the inclusion of a three-stage pad (0, -10 dB, -20 dB) is intended to provide the flexibility needed for recording high SPL sources, such as horns and kickdrums. The mic features black chrome accents as well as hand-selected FET and capacitors

MXL • www.mxlmics.com

Sanken CUX-100K Microphone

Sanken CUX-100K Microphone
Sanken CUX-100K Microphone

First announced earlier in the year, Sanken Microphones is now shipping its new CUX-100K Cardioid or Omnidirectional super wide range professional microphone. The new microphone builds on the history of the company’s Chromatic omni-mode CO-100K, adding the ability to change modes with three settings: Cardioid (Far), Cardioid (Near) and Omni modes. The CUX-100K is intended for a variety of high-resolution, high-sample rate recordings, both in spatial or close-miking applications.

Sanken • www.sankenchromatic.com

How To Choose Your Next Studio Microphone – The Complete Guide

Scope Labs Periscope Microphone

Scope Labs Periscope Microphone
Scope Labs Periscope Microphone

Scope Labs, a new pro-audio manufacturer based in Finland and operating globally, has introduced its first mic, the Periscope Microphone — an omni-condenser microphone with a built-in compressor that gives the mic a unique character. The Periscope is based around an omni capsule followed by a compression circuit intended to highlight textural nuances that the mic captures, with the aim of providing a hyper-realistic sound. The Periscope is manufactured in-house at Scope Labs Ltd. in Finland.

Scope Labs • www.scopelabs.eu

 

Sennheiser MD 435 and MD 445 Vocal Microphones

Sennheiser MD 435 and MD 445 Vocal Microphones
Sennheiser MD 435, MD 445

Sennheiser has introduced two new vocal microphones—the MD 435 large-diaphragm microphone, bringing the company’s dynamic MD 9235 capsule to a wired vocal microphone for the first time; and the MD 445, an LDC with a tight super-cardioid pick pattern. Ostensibly intended for live sound use, they reportedly hold their own in the studio as well. The MD 435’s lightweight aluminum-copper voice coil is intended to provide fast transient response, according to Sennheiser, in an effort to provide detailed, transparent sound. The large-diaphragm microphone features dynamics of 146 dB(A) and can handle sound pressure levels of up to 163 dB/1 kHz. The MD 445 is designed with a high-rejection, super-cardioid pick-up pattern, it reportedly offers uses considerable gain before feedback. Dynamics are wide at 146 dB(A) and the microphone is said to be able to handle sound pressure levels of up to 163 dB/1 kHz.

Sennheiser • www.sennheiser.com

 

Telefunken TF11 Microphone

Telefunken TF11 Microphone
Telefunken TF11 Microphone NICHOLAS SONSINI

The TF11 is the company’s first large diaphragm phantom-powered condenser mic. The CK12-style edge-terminated capsule is a single membrane version of the capsule featured in the TF51, and the amplifier is a proprietary take on the FET mic amplifier similar to the M60, coupled with a custom large format nickel-iron core transformer by OEP/Carnhill made in the UK. The mic’s through-hole components include UK-made polystyrene film capacitors, Nichicon Fine Gold electrolytic capacitors, and a high-performance, ultra-low-noise JFET amplifier.

Telefunken Elektroakustik • www.telefunken-elektroakustik.com

 

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Inside Recording Robert Plant’s ‘Digging Deep’ Podcast

Episodes of the Digging Deep with Robert Plant podcast have been recorded in a variety of settings, including at Rough Trade record store in London.
Episodes of the ‘Digging Deep with Robert Plant’ podcast, co-hosted by Matt Everitt (right) have been recorded in a variety of settings, including at Rough Trade record store in London.

United Kingdom (November 12, 2020)—Where does a rock legend record his podcast? Anywhere he wants to. That’s certainly been the case with Digging Deep with Robert Plant, where the famed Led Zeppelin frontman and solo artist discusses his work across his long and storied career. Every podcast recording session is held in a different location with distinctive acoustics, such as Plant’s favorite pub, one of his homes or in front of an audience of 200 people at a London record store.

Faced with recording in such diverse environments, Matt Everitt, the producer and co-host of Digging Deep, sticks to hard-and-fast rules for microphone placement when tracking the music legend’s stories about songs he recorded with Led Zeppelin and his many post-Zep projects.

“When it comes to singing, obviously he’s got incredible microphone technique, but [for the podcast] we spend quite a bit of time beforehand making sure that wherever we’re going to be sitting, there’s a good kind of catchment area,” says Everitt. “You’ve got to keep an eye on the mic positioning—never handheld, always boom, always between the nose and the chin point.”

While the recording sites might occasionally pose a challenge, the reward, says Everitt, is that they foster engaging discussion. “We’re going to make sure the production standards are good, but it’s also about creating a space where Robert can really relax,” he says. “Part of the production is making it feel natural—not feel like you’re sitting in a chair under a spotlight being interrogated, because he’s not interested in that and neither are we. [We try] to make it a place where you feel like you are eavesdropping.”

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Achieving uniformity in such a range of spaces can be difficult, so Everitt records Plant with a Beyerdynamic M201 microphone that has a hypercardioid pattern. “They’re pretty directional, which means that sometimes people are a bit scared of using them because the catchment is quite narrow, but they sound so warm.”

Another mainstay of Everitt’s on-location setup is to use extra-thick cables: “The thicker the cable, the more reliable it is, the better it sounds—simple as that,” he says. He tracks to a Zoom H6 portable recorder for its ability to maintain separation between channels.

Robert Plant (center) and producer/co-host Matt Everitt (in blazer at left) with Rough Trade staff after the podcast recording session.
Robert Plant (center) and producer/co-host Matt Everitt (in blazer at left) with Rough Trade staff after the podcast recording session. Naz Stone

During post production, Everitt and the audio team work up a fairly completed product for Plant to review, even if it’s only a first cut. Everitt compiles the audio so the mastering and EQ pros can clean it up and take out any clicks and hisses, and then he assembles a “version one” edit, occasionally moving pieces around to maintain story pacing. Plant then listens and gives his input on what does and doesn’t work.

“He’s more knowledgeable than anyone about how he wants the show to sound,” Everitt says. “A lot of that’s worked out pre-interview. We don’t talk too much about what’s going to be in it because it takes away the spontaneity, but we’ll know why this song is really interesting.

“I think one of the reasons it works is that there’s a real honesty,” he adds. “He takes his music very seriously, but I don’t think he always takes the world around showbiz particularly seriously, so he’s happy to puncture some of the myths around the kind of ‘rock god’ world.”

While Robert Plant favors an old-school Shure SM58 mic in concert, he's been behind a Beyerdynamic M201 for his podcast.
While Robert Plant favors an old-school Shure SM58 mic in concert, he’s been using a Beyerdynamic M201 for his podcast.

While many podcasts are leaning into the limitations of COVID culture and adapting to audio recorded over a videoconferencing platform or iPhone, Everitt is playing a longer game with Digging Deep and creating a podcast that isn’t tied to a particular moment in time.

“It’s great doing podcasts over Zoom, it’s fantastic, but we’ve spent a lot of time and effort investing in microphones and audio equipment to get people sounding great because the ears deserve a really well-produced show,” he says.

“They’re all good, all those approaches. Sometimes you need to listen to Fugazi, sometimes you need to listen to Steely Dan. Whether it’s a garage band or a beautifully produced L.A. session thing, both are good depending on what you want. That’s the power of the format, isn’t it? The power of podcasting.”

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Beyerdynamic Debuts New TG Series Mics

Beyerdynamic's new TG D70 kick drum mic (left) and TG 151 instrument mic (right).
Beyerdynamic’s new TG D70 kick drum mic (left) and TG 151 instrument mic (right).

New York, NY (September 28, 2020)—beyerdynamic has launched two new microphones, updating its long-running Touring Gear (TG) series with the introduction of a new dynamic kick-drum microphone‚ the TG D70, and an instrument microphone, the TG 151.

Manufactured at the company’s factory in Heilbronn, Germany, both TG Series microphones have a die-cast zinc housing and compact design, and are intended for use in both the studio and on stage.

The second generation of the TG D70 large diaphragm microphone was designed to record the kick drum in action, so it’s designed to be small and fit right into every hole on a typical kick drum as a result. The microphone can also be set up on a cajon or bass guitar amplifiers to optimally record the instruments’ sound.

Pro Audio Veteran Goes Viral (on YouTube)

An update of beyerdynamic’s M88 capsule can be found inside the new D70, kept isolated via an elastic suspension, a feature that aims to keep impacts from the floor from being transmitted through the stand. The hypercardioid features of the TG D70 are intended to provide isolation from ambient noises and prevent acoustic feedback, suppressing rear sound and capturing minimal side sound.

Meanwhile, the TG 151 can be used on a variety of instruments, from snares and toms to brass instruments and guitar amplifiers. A lean microphone with a short shaft is a snap to attach to the stand or a snare drum with the help of beyerdynamic’s highly popular microphone holder MKV 87. The microphone enhances the tool box used by producers and sound engineers while making their lives much easier.

The TG D70 ($249) and the TG 151 ($129) are available now.

Beyerdynamic • www.beyerdynamic.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Pro Audio Veteran Goes Viral (on YouTube)

As COVID-19 has brought much of the music industry to a halt, it has also unleashed a tidal wave of musical creativity onto the internet as superstars and unknowns alike have livestreamed and posted homebrew performances during quarantine. Some of the clips are cute and others are inept, but after you’ve seen a couple, very few stand out—so let me tell you a bit about one that does, not only for the performance but also the resourceful story behind it. Both amusing to watch and musically satisfying, it’s a viral video of top L.A. session musicians remotely covering the 1980s hit “Easy Lover” by Philip Bailey and Phil Collins.

First off, they nail it—and even if your ears or taste in music don’t agree, they can statistically prove it: At press time, the jubilant clip has amassed more than 145,000 views on YouTube in just two weeks, allowing the behind-the-scenes players—guitarist Jay Gore, drummer Chad Wright, keyboardist Noriko Olling and legendary bassist Leland Sklar—to step into the limelight. Fronting it all on vocals is pro audio industry veteran Gussie Miller, who takes on both Bailey and Collins’ parts with suitable aplomb.

Re-creating the vibe of “Easy Lover” in their viral video are (clockwise from top left): Gussie Miller, Leland Sklar, Gussie Miller, Noriko Olling, Chad Wright and Jay Gore.
Re-creating the vibe of “Easy Lover” in their viral video are (clockwise from top left): Gussie Miller, Leland Sklar, Gussie Miller, Noriko Olling, Chad Wright and Jay Gore.

The “Easy Lover” clip was the brainchild of longtime friends and session pros Gore (Lauryn Hill, Michael McDonald) and Wright (The Jacksons, Bruce Hornsby). Getting Olling (Chaka Khan, Pink, Teena Marie) onboard to play keyboards was easy, as she’s married to Wright. Still, they needed vocals, and Miller quickly came to mind.

While he’s a journeyman audio pro who’s worked everywhere from Sam Ash to NASA—not to mention stints with Steinberg and TC Electronic—Miller is really a singer, having toured as a background vocalist for Lavern Baker, Seal and Cher, in addition to releasing his own album, Forever Plan, a few years ago. Miller recalls, “Jay got ahold of me and said, ‘Dude, Chad and I want to redo “Easy Lover.” Are you down?’ I said sure, but who’s gonna sing the other part? ‘Sing both.’”

The need for a bassist remained, but Miller had an idea. Having befriended Sklar at a Recording Academy event, he called up the renowned bass player, who, in addition to having played on hundreds of hit records over the years, has been Collins’ go-to studio/live bassist for the last 35 years. These days, Sklar has his own group, The Immediate Family, with fellow music legends Waddy Wachtel, Russ Kunkel, Danny Kortchmar and Steve Postell, but when asked to play on the video, he was immediately in, later joking on YouTube, “Gussie recommended me because he said I have a chart to it.”

One thing Sklar didn’t have, however, was a way to record his part. Miller explained, “I called him up and Lee said, ‘Yeah, I’ll do it, but I don’t have any recording gear at home. Never had it—no interest. If you can help me through that, fine.’ I said, let me call some people.” Within minutes, Miller was on the phone with Phil Wagner, senior vice president of Solid State Logic, who recommended the company’s new SSL 2+ interface. “Lee needed an interface, so we made sure he had one in time to complete the track,” said Wagner. “We’re pleased it worked out as I’m a huge fan.” Set up with the SSL 2+ and a copy of Avid Pro Tools Free, “he cut the track and did an amazing job, because he’s Lee Sklar,” laughed Miller.

For his own contributions, Miller not only dressed the part(s) for the viral clip, recalling the sartorial finesse of Bailey and Collins in the original MTV-era “Easy Lover” video, but also got some inside vocal help from an unlikely source: longtime friend and fellow vocalist Valerie Bailey—aka Mrs. Philip Bailey—who sang on Miller’s album a few years ago. “You hear my record, anybody that’s singing above me, that’s Val,” grinned Miller.

Quickly drafting her as a coach, Miller sent Bailey sections of his vocal and got line-by-line feedback: “She was like, ‘Okay, you’re a little ahead of the beat. You gotta lay back; he’s more smooth than that,’ and she would literally talk me through it,” said Miller. “I cut his vocal with a U87, and while Phil Collins always used a Beyer M88, I own one but couldn’t find it, so I ended up cutting his part with a M69. It really made the sound because they’re radically different-sounding microphones. It helped find that urgency with the Phil Collins side.”

Once Miller filmed his cheery impersonations with an iPad (“I live in a condo, so my neighbors must hate me now from hearing the song a million times.”), he sent the footage to Olling, who used the project as an opportunity to teach herself video editing in Adobe Premiere, knocking out the edit in two days while husband Wright mixed the project in Steinberg Nuendo. Uploaded to Sklar’s YouTube account on June 30, the clip gained traction right away, to the delight of all involved.

“We’ve been overjoyed at how it’s blown up,” said Miller. “It has literally freaked me out, because I get email and cool comments, and people are following me or bought my CD. You can’t pay for this kind of advertising.” Indeed, Miller’s next album, My Name Is Gussie, will come out later this year, and he’s hoping the video’s success becomes a launch pad for the collection. For now, the thrill of seeing the clip go viral has given even its naysayers a bit of a shine for Miller: “11,000 people have ‘liked’ the video on YouTube, but 87 people just weren’t feeling it. I think that’s hilarious!”

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com