Tag Archives: Bernie Grundman Mastering

Wilson Audio SabrinaX Loudspeakers | REVIEW

Most audiophiles know of the unwavering commitment to accuracy and groundbreaking industrial design baked into the DNA of every Wilson Audio product (website), and the new Wilson Audio SabrinaX loudspeakers are no exception. This was first evident in Dave Wilson’s original assault on the state of the art with his WAMM design circa 1981, and other loudspeaker systems followed over the years. Along with advancements in materials science and simple but visually striking industrial design aesthetics, each loudspeaker system has a unique raison d’etre rather than simply various scaled-down models at different price points. Words and photos by Dave McNair Dave Wilson practically devoted his life to designing a speaker that would precisely reproduce what his ears (and mics) heard on his extraordinary recordings. His recording approach was a simple, purist style used to record musicians playing in natural acoustic spaces. It might seem simple, but there is nothing easy about this kind of approach. So it naturally follows that faithfully reproducing the recording of that event in a home listening room was his ideal. Today, Daryl Wilson and the rest of the great crew at Wilson Audio have maintained those same ideals and goals while simultaneously refining, improving, and [...]

Original Resource is Part-Time Audiophile

Sue Moreno Masters Memphis Sessions with Grundman

Sue Moreno
Moreno’s team worked with vintage equipment (formerly at Nashville’s famed RCA Studio B and the Grand Ole Opry), recording to 16-track analog tape at Memphis Magnetic Recording studios.

Hollywood, CA (January 22, 2021)—Paul Grundman recently mastered The Memphis Soul Sessions, the latest album by Dutch chanteuse Sue Moreno, at Bernie Grundman Mastering in Hollywood.

“After going through personal loss and some very emotional times,” Moreno explains, “I decided to pick myself up and start working on this album, a very personal record. I decided to go back to the States where I first discovered my musical inspiration. ‘I’m Here’ is the first single and it’s a prayer from the heart, translated into song. I also wrote my first gospel for this album, ‘Let’s Rejoice.’ It’s got that unmistakable Memphis vibe with choir and claps. The Memphis Horns underline the emotion.”

Moreno’s team worked with vintage equipment (formerly at Nashville’s famed RCA Studio B and the Grand Ole Opry), recording to 16-track analog tape at Memphis Magnetic Recording studios as she teamed up with musicians of legendary Hi Rhythm and Stax records fame. Mixing and final production was done by Moreno’s team at Legacy Studio in the Netherlands with engineers Joram Pinxteren and Dennis Letnom.

Grundman Masters Herbie Hancock Anthology

“Those legendary musicians for Hi Rhythm and Stax Records and the Memphis sound, who worked closely with artists like Al Green and Isaac Hayes, decided to get together one more time to work on my album,” Moreno continues. “We have LeRoy Hodges on bass, Lester Snell on piano, Joe Restivo on guitar, George Sluppick on drums, Rev. Charles Hodges on Hammond, the sensational Barnes Brothers on backing vocals as well as the Masqueraders.”

“This album is simply amazing,” says mastering engineer Paul Grundman, “as is the story of Sue Moreno losing her mother and then deciding to do these old-style songs of worship in Memphis with the original musicians. Sue’s team in the Netherlands really came here to find that unique musicianship and were able to record some of the best soul music I’ve ever heard. Sue and the players reached so high and they nailed it, making my job very straightforward. It was all there; I just brought in some subtle touches in the final mastering.”

Bernie Grundman Mastering • www.berniegrundmanmastering.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Remastering Classic Grateful Dead for New 14-LP Set

Mastering engineer Chris Bellman worked with the Grateful Dead’s original quarter-inch stereo master tapes at Bernie Grundman Mastering for the new set.
Mastering engineer Chris Bellman worked with the Grateful Dead’s original quarter-inch stereo master tapes at Bernie Grundman Mastering for the new set.

Hollywood, CA (July 22, 2020)—A new box set of four classic studio LPs and four legendary live albums by the Grateful Dead from Vinyl Me Please was cut fully analog by mastering engineer Chris Bellman working with the original quarter-inch stereo master tapes at Bernie Grundman Mastering.

“It’s Triple-A analog all the way,” says Bellman of the newly remastered 14-LP VMP Anthology: The Story of the Grateful Dead. “There is no digital stage whatsoever.”

Working from the original quarter-inch stereo master analog tapes, Bellman explains, “Quality by and large was very good. Some of the splices were a little bit dicey, so I had to reconstruct some splicing. But that’s relatively easy, just time consuming. You have to pull it apart, clean the tape, and then just redo the splice with fresh splicing tape. They’re all mixed down to quarter-inch, 15 i.p.s., some cases Dolby A, some cases, non-Dolby. And actually, there’s one project that was 30 i.p.s., Terrapin Station.”

Creating the 432-Track ‘Woodstock 50’ Box Set
Bringing the Grateful Dead’s Wall of Sound Back to Life

Albums included in the box set are Workingman’s Dead (1970), American Beauty (1970), Live/Dead (1969), Europe ’72 (1972), Wake of the Flood (1973), Terrapin Station (1977), Reckoning (1981) and Without a Net (1990). Bellman cut all the titles fully analog except Without a Net, which was sourced from the original master digital audio. The anthology was pressed on high quality 180g colored vinyl at Quality Record Pressing (QRP) in Salina, KS.

“My basic process for doing reissues of any kind, as well as these, is that I like to hear what it was when first released,” Bellman explains. “In this case, it was vinyl. So VMP gave me all eight albums on vinyl, the earliest pressings they could find, and I referenced our remastering with those. I put up the tape and I play them roughly parallel and kind of dial it back into the tape. And then I go back, and I turn the record off and I just kind of listen again and try to see what I could do to improve the transfer, faithful to the original.

Bellman adds, “I would say that the playback electronics has much improved, especially over the past 50 years. We can pull off a lot more information off of these tapes, in spite of the fact that they’re 50-plus years old. We can get a lot more resolution off the tape, which lends to a better end vinyl product.”

Bernie Grundman Mastering • www.berniegrundmanmastering.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com