Tag Archives: Audio

Orchard Audio Introduces Starkrimson Stereo Ultra

The following is a press release issued by Starkrimson.

June 15, 2021 | Succasunna, New Jersey –  Following the enormous success of the Starkrimson® Mono amplifier, Orchard Audio is introducing the Starkrimson Stereo Ultra amplifier, with the same proprietary dual-feedback modulator and next-generation gallium nitride (GaN) transistors. Unlike its predicesor the Ultra amplifier delivers up to 500WRMS (1000WPEAK) of power and 20A of current while maintaining extremely low noise and distortion.

This latest design, which has already been previewed, tested and highly praised by those who were able to have access to it, fully explores the benefits of the latest GaN transistors, providing less harshness, cleaner highs, and better overall transparency and detail with irrelevant noise levels. The pulse-width modulation is performed completely in the analog domain before being amplified by the GaN power stages. Starkrimson amplifiers use Leo Ayzenshtat’s proprietary DC-coupled, fully balanced dual feedback modulator, which allows the amplifier to be completely balanced from input to output, through the use of bridged GaN power stages.

This design provides the Starkrimson Stereo Ultra amplifiers with a huge reserve of power for extended transients, and the power expands linearly with the load – 125 watts into 16 ohms; 250 watts into 8 ohms; and 500 watts into 4 ohms – for powerful, unrestrained music. The amplifier is packaged in an aluminum and steel chassis with high-end gold-plated binding posts and connectors, with a front panel option of either matte black or brushed aluminum (silver).

Features:

  • Fully balanced from input to output (w/differential input)
  • Differential and single-ended audio inputs
  • Extremely low noise and distortion
  • 2-ohm capable
  • 20A of output current

 

Specifications:

  • Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR): 120dB (A-weighted, 22kHz BW)
  • Frequency response: DC – 80kHz+
  • Gain (balanced input): 19.05dB
  • Gain (single-ended input): 25.05dB
  • Power output into 16/8/4Ω: 125/250/500WRMS

 

Orchard Audio is still offering preorder prices ($1,999.95 USD) on its website until the end of June 2021. Starkrimson Stereo Ultra amplifiers will start shipping in August and are available with differential (XLR) and single-ended (RCA) inputs or both ($150 option). All DIY enthusiasts can also order the Starkrimson Ultra Mono Amp Module and kits separately, in order to build their own systems.

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Original Resource is Articles – The Absolute Sound

Absent Without Leave

We Ignore the Diminishing Value of Interactional Music Performance at Our Peril

With the democratization of music performance, we are all music inventors now. Anybody with a laptop and the ability to whistle a tune may invent the next musical genre without ever finding her way to a rehearsal room. For centuries, however, the music eco-system has entertained the notion of the dedicated performer. This individual plays one or more instruments (including the voice), with the benefit of some training or none. Before the digital world arrived, you were Liszt or Liberace, Satriani or Santana, Hendrix or Holiday, Marley or Madonna, violinist, bassist, or saxophonist, or you aspired to being one of those, or assisted one of them in your role as a skilled support instrumentalist. Now that facsimiles of all these people are in our laptops, are we still making fresh ones? Are they an endangered species? Do we have enough already? Why do we need more?  In brief, why do we need instrumental performers?

Danger Up Ahead

Performance skills seem to be little valued at the point of origin of a track or song (notwithstanding that those skills may acquire more value at the point of its public reproduction), being apparently easily emulated through music technology. Instrumental popular music performance, as evidenced by the laying on of hands to wood, gut, skin, and silicone in real-time collaboration with others, appears to be at something of a digital-age split in the road. One signpost points to ossification and redundancy, the other to re-evaluation and creative utility.

To master a musical instrument to a level that affords minimal creative options is seen as literally unaffordable because it takes too long. A cyclical reduction of skills (fewer are needed so fewer are provided so fewer are needed) condemns the limited performer to the constant repetition of the handful of gestures necessary to invoke the three chords and a backbeat paradigm. Most drummers, for example, are obliged to perform much the same thing most of the time. This is both a wasted resource and an unnecessary reduction to which they have acceded because they both underestimate and are unwilling to assert their cultural importance as catalysts for musical action. 

Drummers are well placed to resuscitate, to breathe life, to bring life to collective performance, but they remain too ready to abandon training, instinct and intuition at a moment’s notice, to accommodate another’s worldview. They tinker away in the engine room of the music to little effect—an abandonment of their traditional area of influence that borders upon a dereliction of duty. Such dereliction cedes power to others (client/producer/programmer) and eliminates the participatory discrepancies that make a performance unique. It halts the interactional scrabbling for the song-specific component that transforms the mechanical into the magical, the uncreative into the creative. To follow that road for a few more years will rightly consign the drummer to oblivion and do a calamitous disservice to popular music. Current practice, thus reduced, is susceptible to imitation by computer. Future value lies in the production of artefacts the computer cannot produce. What can the performer do that the computer cannot? 

It’s About Interaction, Stupid

Reversal is possible, however, given awareness of the situation. Research among expert drummers suggests that the answer lies in their specialist knowledge of rhythmic matters combined with sophisticated collaborative interactional skills that brings life to the music, preserving it from the dead hand of the oscilloscope. To communicate effectively, music needs interaction, be it intra-human, or human-computer. Music that includes interactive performance seems to be more affective than that generated from a technological alternative. Thinking around rhythm and drums has almost completely ossified in “mainstream” drumming, notwithstanding the fact that a thin top slice of expert players embody and exemplify the full range of creative expression possible across all genres.

High-level interactive abilities render performance outcomes effectively irreplaceable and irreducible, less prone to reproduction. I do this because you did that, or are continuing to do this. I may have misinterpreted your intention, but now we’ve both got something that previously did not exist in our imaginations or fact. I never much liked the first thing anyway. I think it’s good; you think it’s hopeless. How to resolve the problem? Let’s agree to disagree, put it on one side and start afresh with the lyric. Why are you stammering about m-m-m-My Generation? Great idea! Why a bass solo break? Because the man has an amazing sound with the Rickenbacker round wire strings. We could use that. From the employer’s point of view she never thought of doing it that way.

Alive to the Situation

Music education can help here. If creativity such as this is to be part of learning, a greater appreciation of what it means and feels like to collaborate creatively should be inculcated within popular music education: too heavily geared to the acquisition of technical ability as a creative tool, too little geared to the socio-cultural framework within which music creativity is typically enacted and distributed. A re-balancing would stimulate a reconsideration of the core purpose and value of performance such as continues to be found at the highest levels in popular music, but whose benefits are not being communicated further down the food-chain.

As digital-age music inventors move further from pre-digital notions of performance, there seems to be an uncomfortable and unspoken feeling that things were somehow “better” in the “old days,” that the analog 8-track Who and the Kinks rocked harder than their over-dubbed and down-loaded contemporary counterparts, and maybe there really was something about this business of playing music together with others that we dispensed with at our peril. Music students might be better introduced to the subtleties of human musical co-operation, that transformation of knowledge that takes place in the rehearsal room that gives life to the artefact at hand. In my mind, that’s what music performance is about.

The Call to Arms

Much of the above has focussed on drumming and the drummer, but is applicable to any instrumental performer. We need these people, and we need them to stand up and be counted. We need them to dive deep into their instruments to mine glistening new sounds and mint fresh possibilities for them. We need them to make a performance both unique and greater than the sum of its parts. We need them like the oyster needs her grit, the irritant that gives access to the previously unimaginable. I doubt Liszt could have imagined Hendrix, nor Mozart Stockhausen. The steps connecting each to the other were rough-hewn in part from the intervening decades of instrumental performance. We need performers to do what the computer cannot. Currently, computers aren’t great at interactional skills, but even that window may shut soon. Notwithstanding all the computer power at our fingertips, it’s hard to imagine four machines producing the Who’s My Generation or Miles’ Bitches Brew. Above all, we need instrumental performers to interact with each other, the producer, the listener, and the world.

Some say a society gets the music it pays for; others that it gets the music that it deserves. I think it gets the music it can imagine. The music inventor needs collaboration with instrumentalists. That way he may be confronted with ways of doing things he’s never imagined before. 

Without such interaction, the music outcome is a lesser thing, bereft of its staff of life. Society ignores the value of interactional music performance at its peril. Video gaming is now replacing music as the most important aspect of youth culture: we musicians have practically invited it to do so. Music can use all the help it can get. Bold, breath-taking, imaginative, and skillful instrumental performance can offer a lot. Come on players, your country needs you. Let’s get to it. 

Bill Bruford, Ph.D., has an international profile as a bandleader, composer and drummer across multiple popular music ensembles over four decades. Retiring from public performance in 2009, he acquired his doctorate from the University of Surrey, UK, in 2016. He has written on the topic of music performance and creativity, and lectured extensively at European and North American institutions. billbruford.com.

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Original Resource is Articles – The Absolute Sound

The Focal powered by Naim Store: The Future of High-End Dealerships?

The Imperative

High end audio faces an imperative: to expand its market before traditional customers age out, young prospects opt for ultimate convenience over superior sonics, and well-heeled, middle-aged professionals succumb to the more discreet aesthetics and intuitive usability of CI. (For those unfamiliar with that last acronym, it stands for “Custom Installation.” CI is a massive field in which the bulk of high-end manufacturers play no role.)

Every producer in our industry is aware of the imperative to expand the customer base. Most are addressing it in the form of new products aimed at attracting new customers. Thus, we see even uber-high-end purveyors like Goldmund offering headphone amps and compact integrateds. Yet while moving into new product categories is clearly a necessary step, is it sufficient?

In particular, is the traditional audio dealer—dimly-lit, dark-hued, bursting with intimidating gear stacked on industrial-looking racks—where Millennials and affluent families really want to go to drop a sizable portion of their discretionary funds? Perhaps not. The younger crowd is accustomed to Best Buy, where they can find Sonos, or Bose shop. And, as already noted, those middle-aged couples building their dream home are highly susceptible to the comfy environs that CI dealers offer. Maybe, then, in addition to a broader product range, high-end expansion also requires a rethink of the traditional dealer.

That’s certainly the premise behind recent moves by the VerVent Audio Group, owner of English electronics manufacturer Naim and French speaker builder Focal. VerVent is working with its worldwide dealer network to create new, dedicated places to showcase and sell Naim and Focal products. The new spaces are called “Focal powered by Naim” stores, and, though they may be located within or adjacent to existing dealers, they are very different from those traditional outlets.

To create a store, VerVent shares the cost and workload with a partner dealer. Specifically, VerVent dictates elements (color scheme, graphics, etc) that define the store’s “look and feel.” The company also generates an initial store layout, optimized for the available space, and proposes an initial equipment configuration. Both are subject to the dealer’s revision and approval. Finally, VerVent provides financial assistance for both constructing the store and populating it with demo gear. The end result is owned, staffed and operated by the dealer. Once the new store is up and running, the relationship between the manufacturer and the dealer reverts to normal.

The benefits of this approach are easy to glean. Because the look of these stores is centrally controlled, Naim and Focal maintain a consistent, recognizable visual presence worldwide. At the same time, the stores cement in the customer’s mind the close relationship between Naim and Focal. Finally, unlike other schemes being tried by some high-end manufacturers, such as direct or online sales, the VerVent approach ensures that it is never in competition with its dealers. Most significantly, this model gives both VerVent and participating dealers an opportunity to create an entirely new environment attuned to the tastes of a broader audience.

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Original Resource is Articles – The Absolute Sound

ELAC Announces the Uni-Fi Reference Line of Home Speakers

The following is a press release issued by ELAC.

Orange, CA | June 7th, 2021 – ELAC, a leading global provider of high-performance speakers and electronics, today announced the Uni-Fi Reference line of home speakers. This new line builds upon the success of the Uni-Fi 2.0 series and incorporates a variety of performance and cosmetic improvements.

“This new line removes the price limitations of the Uni-Fi 2.0 series along with the technical barriers associated with that price point. The Uni-Fi Reference series offers significant performance improvements such as cast chassis for both the concentric and bass drivers, newly developed bass and concentric drivers, enhanced bracing, improved crossover design, along with luxury cosmetics” said James Krodel, senior vice president sales, ELAC.

Some of the notable new features of the Uni-Fi Refence line-up include.

Newly Developed 4” Concentric Driver with Cast Chassis: A wide-surround tweeter enhances its low and high frequency extension allowing for improved blending with the midrange. An entirely new midrange driver with large diameter voice coil, vented rear spider and new neodymium magnet allows for better excursion and control of midrange frequencies. A new cast chassis was designed to minimize reflections back to the cone resulting in better clarity.

Newly developed 5.25” and 6.5” Aluminum Woofers with Cast Chassis: Drastically improving low-end reproduction, this newly developed bass driver features a single piece compound curvature aluminum cone with a large rear vented magnet delivering improved linearity and better low frequency response of any previous Uni-Fi bookshelf speaker.

Sophisticated 3-way Crossover: An entirely new design improves response linearity, improves driver integration, and delivers a true 6-ohm nominal impedance for compatibility with virtually all AV receivers.

Full Perimeter Bracing: Reducing the speaker cabinets influence on audio quality the Uni-Fi Reference line implements full perimeter bracing significantly reducing cabinet vibration and cabinet coloration.

Front Firing Ports – Placing the vents on the front of the bookshelf and center speakers allows for greater freedom of placement, even in restricted places like a cabinet or up close to a wall.

All three new models will be available in late-June at ELAC retailers nationwide.

 

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Original Resource is Articles – The Absolute Sound

Q&A with Jack Sharkey of KEF

What ignited your interest in high-end audio? Did it come from the music side or the electronics side? 

I come from a musical family, so that was the spark, but as I got more involved in music, I became more and more fascinated with sound and eventually the physics of sound. Sound has always been a means to enjoy the art of music, but I do admit that it’s the noise music makes that really interests me.

What do you consider to be your first high-end system?

After college I saved for a little JVC receiver and a turntable from JC Penney, but the crowning jewel was my pair of Acoustic Research AR-18 bookshelves. I went to the shop down the street once a week for three months to listen to them. It was a great start to the journey. There was something very satisfying about putting together the best system I could afford at the time, and I’ve never forgotten the feeling I had the first time I listened to my humble little system.

What kind of education did you receive?

I started school doing audio engineering, and finished my schooling on the 10-year night-school plan in electronics engineering and computer-hardware design.

What differentiates high-end audio from other forms of audio?

The experience. You have to be looking for the emotion and passion only music can provide in order to really “get” high-end audio, whether you approach it from a passion for the art or the science. Music is not a passive experience—you have to be engaged with it even if you’re simply sitting in your living room—so the greater the detail in the performance or the playback, the greater the passion and emotion in your heart and soul.

KEF is placing increasing emphasis on wireless/active loudspeakers. Is this where the industry is going?

Because streaming is the future of music and because the available technology makes super-high-performing active systems affordable, there is a definite trend in that direction. But systems made of separates are always going to have a place in the market.

What interesting fact, philosophy, or aspect about KEF might surprise audiophiles?

The level of engineering we do to make our speakers. We attack our design process from the physics level, with a ground-up approach for every product line. It’s the principle the company was founded on, and we’re privileged to still be able to work that way today.

Looking in your crystal ball, where do you see the high end in the next 10 years?

I think we’re entering a new audio renaissance, so I believe more people will come to appreciate high end. The first 15 years of this century were kind of a low point in music appreciation because we were all so fascinated with convenience over quality, but I think we’re beginning to see that was all just a fad. Whether its food, wine, or music, people crave the best possible sensory experience they can get their hands on, and technology has made it possible for music lovers and audiophiles to get amazing audio reproduction that is also convenient beyond anything we thought possible even ten years ago.

What challenges are the high-end industry facing?

Technology is changing at such a rapid rate that it’s hard to know what will be expected of a product in even three or four years’ time. Couple this with the fact that the digital infrastructure on the consumer and provider’s ends are stressed to saturation, and you’ve got challenges that were unheard of until recently. Right now, bandwidth is the biggest tech hurdle, and re-introducing consumers to music that sounds great is the biggest market challenge.

Outside of audio, what do you do for fun?

I ride motorcycles (I’m currently on an Indian), and I’m trying my hand at gentleman farming, but I never really find myself very far from music or audio in some fashion. That’s what’s fun about riding (or cutting hay)—I go without a radio or sound system and just connect with the machine and the surroundings. It’s very liberating and relaxing.

What inspires you about your work?

Sound. Followed by music. I’m extremely privileged to work in an industry and for a company that shares my same passion. It makes it very easy to get up and go to work in the morning. I started fooling around with speakers when I was 14, and after a few career detours here and there it’s amazing to be right back where my passion has always been. 

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Original Resource is Articles – The Absolute Sound

Now shipping, the 2yu heralds the arrival of a standalone Chord Electronics network bridge

Now shipping, the 2yu heralds the arrival of a standalone Chord Electronics network bridge

1st June 2021, Kent, UK: Chord Electronics’ 2yu digital interface for the 2go streamer/server is now shipping worldwide, following its 2020 reveal. The 2yu connects to the existing 2go streamer/server to create Chord Electronics’ first-ever network bridge, ready for use with DACs, DAC-equipped A/V devices and Chord Electronics’ Hugo M Scaler. 2yu is specifically designed for 2go: the resultant network bridge offers high-resolution streaming from both wired Ethernet and wireless sources (using 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi or A2DP Bluetooth), including popular streaming services such as Qobuz, Tidal and Internet radio; the combination is also Roon Ready. In addition to streaming, 2go’s ...

Original Resource is Hi-Fi+ Articles

WBT – German Innovation Award 2021, Category: Medium-sized Companies

WBT - German Innovation Award 2021, Category: Medium-sized Companies

WBT-Industrie has been nominated for the German Innovation Award 2021 in the medium-sized companies category for its development of the process “3D gold-plating of connectors using PVD plasma” (PVD = Physical Vapour Deposition), internal brand name: WBT-PlasmaProtect™. With this plant technology it has, for the first time, been possible to develop a significantly more environmentally-friendly process to use instead of the electroplating process used previously. The effectiveness was increased from 20 to 80% by a new 3D process, the energy requirements were reduced by around 26% and resource consumption was reduced by about 35%. At the same time, the contact ...

Original Resource is Hi-Fi+ Articles

SNEAK PEEK: Sound of ‘WandaVision’

Take a peek at the Sound for WandaVision panel at Mix Sessions Emmy Awards Season, featuring the Skywalker Sound team of Danielle Dupre, Kim Foscato, Steve Orlando and Gwendolyn Yates Whittle. Moderated by Jennifer Walden, this is just one of the presentations featured at Mix Sessions: Emmy Awards Season, where Mix sits down with audio post teams behind some of the year’s best work in sound for television.

Register for FREE Now at https://www.mixsoundforfilm.com/sessions/virtual

Pros behind the sound and music of some of this year’s biggest television hits will divulge all when they sit down Wednesday, May 26 for the free virtual event, Mix Sessions Emmy Awards Season.

Mix Sessions Emmy Awards Season Set for Wednesday

The free, one-day event will include behind-the-scenes interviews with the leading supervising sound editors, sound designers, re-recording mixers, composers, production sound mixers, editors, technologists and creative talent vying for this year’s Best Sound awards. Meet the women and men who tackled sound and music for Wandavision, Small Axe, The Falcon and The Winter Soldier, The Underground Railroad and Sylvie’s Love.

In addition to a series of profiles on the year’s best dramatic and documentary programs, Mix Sessions: Emmy Awards Season will feature two special roundtable discussions—The Documentary Score: Emotional Reality and Sound Editing and Mixing: Comedy, Drama and In-Between.

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

ARE YOU SCARED OF ROLLERCOASTERS?

ARE YOU SCARED OF ROLLERCOASTERS?

Scotland’s leading hi-fi, home cinema and smart home retailer, Loud & Clear, has again partnered with Racing Awareness Scotland to help support Dementia charities. And as part of this partnership, they are offering the chance to win a passenger ride around the track in an RAS racing car. Are you scared of fast rollercoasters? If you are, don’t enter this competition! Racing Awareness Scotland was founded by Alex Milne in 2019 and works with Race Against Dementia, Alzheimer Scotland and Support in Mind Scotland. The RAS team works to raise awareness for these charities and campaigns to make life easier ...

Original Resource is Hi-Fi+ Articles

Zuma Lumisonic – custom install sound and lighting made easy

Zuma Lumisonic - custom install sound and lighting made easy

We don’t do much in the way of custom install products in Hi-Fi+, pretty much for the same reasons we don’t cover that much home cinema/home theatre equipment… it’s not one of our areas of specialism. Custom Install systems are increasingly integrated with home automation, HVAC, alarms… and lots of modern home sub-systems that require expertise that is often different to the requirements of the audiophile. However, the two paths have a lot in common, and Zuma might just be the perfect bridge between the two worlds. A UK-based tech start-up, Zuma, featuring the design smarts of Morten Warren and ...

Original Resource is Hi-Fi+ Articles