Author Archives: Clive Young

Pro Sound News’ Top 10 Stories of All-Time

PSN Top 10 Stories of 2021Here are PSN‘s Top 10 most popular stories of all-time, as ranked by Google Analytics. PSN has merged with Mix over at Mixonline.com; find us there, and also check out the revamped Mix weekday newsletter (get your free subscription at https://bit.ly/3gVh4Gf).

10. Software Tech: 96 kHz vs. 44.1 kHz—Let’s Settle This By Craig Anderton. Ever since we’ve had a choice of sample rates, there’s been controversy over whether higher sample rates sound better.

9. Bringing the Grateful Dead’s Wall of Sound Back to Life By Clive Young. Tribute act Dead On Live teams with Asbury Audio to replicate the legendary Wall of Sound concert audio system.

8. Timbaland’s VA Studio Hits the Market By Clive Young. The R&B megaproducer’s Virginia Beach studio complex is up for sale, along with its gear.

7. Monitor Engineer Michael Mule, Dead at 57 By Clive Young. Monitor engineer Michael Mule worked with everyone from Iron Maiden to Anita Baker across a nearly 40-year career that began at CBGB.

6. Seen on the Scene: 2019 NAMM Show, Day One By Clive Young. Dive into our huge photo gallery for all the new products, sights and hoopla of Day One.

5. Bose S1 Pro Multi-Position P.A. System – A Real-World Review By Jordan Kaplan. Bose’s first portable PA under $1,000 delivers considerable bang for the buck.

4. Behind the Scenes of the Grammys’ Live Sound By Steve Harvey. Providing live sound for an audience composed of the top music artists and executives is no easy task.

3. AKM Factory Fire—A Pro-Audio Industry Disaster By Clive Young. An 82-hour fire in AKM’s semiconductor factory is already hurting numerous top pro-audio manufacturers around the globe.

2. Finneas on Producing Billie Eilish’s Hit Album in his Bedroom By Steve Harvey. Finneas O’Connell—Billie Eilish’s co-writer, producer, older brother and an artist in his own right—discusses recording her sonically adventurous debut at their family home.

1. Police Photos Reveal First Look Inside Prince’s Legendary Tape Vault By Clive Young. Prince’s tape vault, rumored to contain thousands of unreleased songs, was a musical urban myth until his 2016 death, when photos taken by police investigators revealed that the rumors were true.

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Pro Sound News’ Top 5 Live Sound Stories of All-Time

PSN Top 5 Live Sound Stories of All-TimeHere are PSN‘s Top 5 most popular live sound stories of all-time, as ranked by Google Analytics. PSN has merged with Mix over at Mixonline.com; find us there, and also check out the revamped Mix weekday newsletter (get your free subscription at https://bit.ly/3gVh4Gf).

5. Tool Tours with Intricate, Immersive Sound By Steve Harvey. Touring the world behind Fear Inoculum, Tool’s first album in 13 years, the prog-metal heroes are filling arenas with a massive audio system that takes a new approach to immersive live sound.

4. Exclusive: Yamaha Launches Rivage PM5, PM3 Desks, DSPs, More By Clive Young. Take an exclusive sneak peek of Yamaha’s most ambitious expansion for the Rivage series yet, as the company introduces two new consoles—the PM5 and PM3—as well as a pair of new DSP engines—DSP-RX and DSP-RX-EX—and Version 4 firmware.

3. Bringing the Grateful Dead’s Wall of Sound Back to Life By Clive Young. Tribute act Dead On Live teams with Asbury Audio to replicate the legendary Wall of Sound concert audio system.

2. Monitor Engineer Michael Mule, Dead at 57 By Clive Young. Monitor engineer Michael Mule worked with everyone from Iron Maiden to Anita Baker across a nearly 40-year career that began at CBGB.

1. Behind the Scenes of the Grammys’ Live Sound By Steve Harvey. Providing live sound for an audience composed of the top music artists and executives is no easy task.

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Pro Sound News’ Top 5 Recording Stories of All-Time

PSN Top 5 Recording Stories of All-TimeHere are PSN‘s Top-5 most popular recording stories of all-time, as ranked by Google Analytics. PSN has merged with Mix over at Mixonline.com; find us there, and also check out the revamped Mix weekday newsletter (get your free subscription at https://bit.ly/3gVh4Gf).

5. Software Tech: 96 kHz vs. 44.1 kHz—Let’s Settle This By Craig Anderton. Ever since we’ve had a choice of sample rates, there’s been controversy over whether higher sample rates sound better.

4. Recording Studios Are Not Dying By Clive Young. USA Today says recording studios are a dying industry. That’s dead wrong—and here’s why.

3. Timbaland’s VA Studio Hits the Market By Clive Young. The R&B megaproducer’s Virginia Beach studio complex is up for sale, along with its gear.

2. Finneas on Producing Billie Eilish’s Hit Album in his Bedroom By Steve Harvey. Finneas O’Connell—Billie Eilish’s co-writer, producer, older brother and an artist in his own right—discusses recording her sonically adventurous debut at their family home.

1. Police Photos Reveal First Look Inside Prince’s Legendary Tape Vault By Clive Young. Prince’s tape vault, rumored to contain thousands of unreleased songs, was a musical urban myth until his 2016 death, when photos taken by police investigators revealed that the rumors were true.

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Pro Sound News’ Top 5 Stories of 2021 (So Far)

PSN Top 5 Stories of 2021 (so far)Here are PSN‘s Top-5 most popular articles of 2021 so far, as ranked by Google Analytics. PSN has merged with Mix over at Mixonline.com; find us there, and also check out the revamped Mix weekday newsletter (get your free subscription at https://bit.ly/3gVh4Gf).

5. From Purge to Perfection: Illangelo on Producing The Weeknd’s After Hours By Keith Nelson. After selling off his studio gear in order to leave the music business, Grammy-winning producer Illangelo returned to the fold, spending a year working on The Weeknd’s hit album After Hours.

4. The Lost Treasure of Joe Meek’s Tea Chest Tapes By Steve Harvey. Legendary UK producer Joe Meek left behind nearly 1,900 tapes when he committed suicide in the 1960s. After sitting in storage for 50-plus years, the ‘lost’ tapes are being digitized in a mammoth 18-month project, saving unheard early work by David Bowie, Ray Davies, Ritchie Blackmore, Marc Bolan, Steve Marriott, Gene Vincent and more.

3. Audacity Acquired By Muse Group By Clive Young. Audacity, the long-running open source, cross-platform audio editor, has been acquired by Muse Group.

2. Pirate Sees Self-Service Studio Market for the Taking By Steve Harvey. Having conquered the UK, Pirate aims to build 4,000 unattended, self-service studios across North America by 2024.

1. Capitol Riot Loots, Damages Live Sound Systems By Clive Young. In January, rioters at the U.S. Capitol stole and vandalized live sound equipment that Maryland Sound International had onsite for the presidential inauguration.

 

 

 

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

PRO SOUND NEWS MOVES TO MIX

Dear Pro Sound News Reader—

PSN and Mix are merging. We are combining both iconic pro-audio news brands, bringing together the best features of each under the Mix name.

Starting in July, you’ll find all the great stuff you come here for—our Real-World Reviews, our trademark live sound coverage, industry analysis and more—over at mixonline.com.

To be clear, PRO SOUND NEWS is still bringing you the latest pro-audio coverage, just over at Mix. Same staff, same crucial news, different website and magazine.

PSN subscribers will start receiving Mix with its July, 2021 issue. Since we’re cramming two magazines into one, Mix will be growing in size, giving you even more to read and discover.

Also, starting July 6, the Mix SmartBrief email newsletter will increase to FIVE days a week to add all of PSN‘s coverage. Set up your free subscription now at https://bit.ly/3gVh4Gf so you can keep up on the latest pro audio news.

We’re looking forward to bringing you more of the great content you read PSN for, so we’ll see you in the pages of Mix!

Clive Young

Content Director, Pro Sound News (and now Mix!)

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Avid Reaps Rewards

Avid CEO/president Jeff Rosica
Avid CEO/president Jeff Rosica

Boston, MA (June 23, 2021)—Avid Technology had a solid first quarter in 2021, despite—and in some ways, due to—the pandemic. The company reported a net income of $4.4 million, a bounce forward after reporting a loss during the same quarter a year earlier; the company’s stock price more than tripled over the intervening 12 months.

“Our Q1 performance was really, really quite strong and the music space has been a large contributor to that,” Avid CEO/president Jeff Rosica told PSN in mid-May, pointing additionally to the late 2019 release of the S1 control surface and late 2020 release of its Carbon interface, as products that beat internal sales projections during the pandemic.

Innovations: Avid VENUE S6L Unified Platform

Avid’s first-quarter total revenue increased 9.2% year-over-year, powered in large part by recurring revenue components—which is to say subscriptions to software products like Pro Tools, Sibelius and Media Composer. Q1 saw subscription revenue of $24.9 million, marking a 78.2% year-over-year growth and a net increase of roughly 28,000 paid subscriptions during the quarter.

“Our confidence is growing because we see the end [of the pandemic]—the market’s recovering,” Rosica added. “On one end, you have ‘music at home’—the project studio at home [technology market] has just been going crazy the whole time. It was already strong and the pandemic seems to have only increased the energy there. I think audio post to starting to come back now and is getting pretty strong, and live sound, we’re just starting to see the embers of that start to light up and go, so it’s been pretty good.”

Avid • www.avid.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Brooklyn Bowl Nashville is Ready to Roll

A d&b audiotechnik Vi line array system brings concert performances to multiple floors—and 19 lanes of bowling—at Brooklyn Bowl Nashville.
A d&b audiotechnik Vi line array system brings concert performances to multiple floors—and 19 lanes of bowling—at Brooklyn Bowl Nashville. Rick Smith

Nashville, TN (June 18, 2021)—They say that bad things happen in threes, but for the team behind Brooklyn Bowl Nashville, two was more than enough.

“Our grand opening was scheduled for Friday, March 13, 2020,” recalls Carl Gatti, head of production for the venue. “After the first day of orientation on March 1, we had a horrible tornado come through North Nashville. Structures across the street and behind us were totaled, but our only damage was a broken window, some smashed patio furniture and a knocked-over HVAC on the roof. We encouraged staff to volunteer in the neighborhood for the cleanup, and pushed orientation to the following week—we still had the VIP grand opening party set for Friday night. Thursday, as we were finishing the video install and running some lines for lighting world, we got the call to send staff home because of the coronavirus. We got the double whammy.”

A full 16 months later, Brooklyn Bowl Nashville will hold its long-awaited grand opening June 25 and 26 with a pair of Old Crow Medicine Show concerts, finally seeing the 1,200-capacity venue throw open its doors to the public. Coming 12 years after the original Brooklyn Bowl opened in New York City, the new LEED-certified venue serves up live music, 19 lanes of bowling and a patio overlooking third base of First Horizon Park, the next-door home of the Triple-A Nashville Sounds baseball team.

Tour pros who pull up to the venue can expect to use an audio system outfitted with Avid VENUE S6L-24C consoles at FOH and monitor world, while the crowd is covered via a sizable d&b audiotechnik rig based around Vi8 and Vi12 speakers, Vi SUB and B22 subwoofers, and various Y10p fill speakers; monitoring includes a passel of M4 wedges, V-GSubs and V8 sidefills. Available miking includes usual suspects from Shure, Sennheiser and Audio-Technica, and a variety of Radial DIs are on-hand as well.

There’s also plenty of streaming gear in-house, all of which has been put to good use. “It ended up being our saving grace to get us through this pandemic,” says Gatti. Over the last year, the venue hosted major livestreams by Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, Larkin Poe, Maren Morris, Margo Price and Billy Strings among others, and also became a movie studio for a day when Dierks Bentley filmed the video for his hit “Gone” there, using the stage for performance footage while commandeering the kitchen, bar and other areas to film send-ups of classic movies and sitcoms.

The livestreams will continue, but the venue’s looking forward to hosting live audiences—and bowling, which continues during shows. “The pins are on strings so they’re significantly quieter and dampened; you don’t hear pins crashing or being reset while the show is happening,” says Gatti. “Headliners go on around 9:30, play 90 minutes, maybe a two-hour set, and then while people are partying until we close at 2, we do what we call the Disco Load-Out.”

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

EAW Launches NTX Line Array, SBX Subwoofer

EAW's NTX201L Line Array speaker
EAW’s NTX201L Line Array speaker

Whitinsville, MA (June 15, 2021)—Eastern Acoustic Works has unveiled its new NTX Series Line Array and SBX Series Subwoofer.

The NTX201L is a 2×10” articulated array with an integrated 1,600 W two-channel amplifier and universal PFC power supply. The NTX210L operates in the 55 Hz – 18 kHz range with a max SPL of 140 dB, and additionally has a 90° horizontal and 12° vertical nominal beamwidth. The NTX201L uses EAW’s OptiLogic technology, providing automatic array self-detection via onboard infrared sensors and accelerometers, and optimization including air loss compensation and more. The NTX series features integrated Dante networking including analog redundancy capability, allowing the analog input to be set to automatically enable if the Dante signal is lost.

Meanwhile, the SBX Series high output subwoofers are also debuting with two models—the SBX218, capable of a total 5,000 watts, and the SBX118, capable of 2,500 watts. Both operate in the 25 Hz–120 Hz frequency range with a max SPL of 141 dB for the SBX218 and 135 dB for the SBX118. Both models feature exclusive 18-inch neodymium woofers with 4-inch voice coils. Designed to complement the NTX210L Line Array, they can support other systems as well.

EAW Brings MKD Speaker Production Back to U.S.

The SBX Series subs sport hefty grills with large openings to protect the woofers and resist damage, while the large port, inspired by aircraft design, is intended to prevent port noise. EAW’s DynO dynamic optimization processing technology is also applied.

The NXT and SBX series both integrate with EAW’s Resolution 2 software, which provides system optimization, as well as room design and prediction, in a single application.

Eastern Acoustic Works • www.eaw.com

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

View From the Top: Philippe Depallens, VP/GM, Ultimate Ears Pro

Philippe Depallens, VP/GM, Ultimate Ears Pro
Philippe Depallens, VP/GM, Ultimate Ears Pro

“Music has always been part of my life,” says Philippe Depallens, vice president and general manager of Ultimate Ears Pro. Music and the fundamental understanding of its importance—emotionally, culturally and economically—was always present in the small Swiss city where he grew up, as it was home to the famed Montreux Jazz Festival. Great artists from around the world would travel there to create intimate musical moments for rapturous audiences. Perhaps it was only appropriate then that years later, Depallens would champion Ultimate Ears Pro’s in-ear monitors (IEMs)—products intended to both help musicians create those live moments, and imbue even casual listeners with that same sense of aural intimacy.

Fascinated tinkering with audio gear at a young age, Depallens went on to apprentice in electrical engineering before eventually earning an engineering degree and heading overseas. “Moving to the U.S. right after school continued my exposure to the diversity and richness of a global perspective,” he feels. While he joined Logitech—itself a Swiss entity—in the 1990s, it wasn’t until the consumer electronics powerhouse acquired Ultimate Ears in 2008 that Depallens finally began working in pro audio.

Ultimate Ears Bluetooth Cable – A Real-World Review

“When I joined Ultimate Ears Pro, I was able to combine my passion for music, my engineering knowledge and everything that I had previously learned at Logitech about creating meaningful and impactful experiences around our products,” he says today. “This was well before the global headphone revolution was underway, and way before the dominance of true wireless. Actually, this was during the early stages of the smartphone, when everyone was predicting the imminent death of the PC. I volunteered to oversee the acquisition because I knew that I could retain Ultimate Ears’ pro-audio roots and heritage while helping commercialize the core in-ear technology that is now ubiquitous today.”

Since then, both Depallens and Ultimate Ears Pro have re-envisioned the company’s approach to custom IEMs; whereas once it focused almost exclusively on product specs, today, the brand takes a larger view of the customer experience, and has put considerable effort into simplifying and accelerating the customization process. Early on, that meant creating mobile demo stations that allowed users to discover their preferred sound signature. Later, the company pioneered 3D scanning and 3D printing for custom in-ears—a move that reduced lead times from weeks to days. All the while, Ultimate Ears Pro continued to evolve its product designs based on user feedback, aiming to make its in-ears as reliable and sweatproof as possible.

Ultimate Ears Fitkit, 18+ CSX IEM – A Real-World Review

With Ultimate Ears Pro well-established in the live sound industry, Depallens looked to put that brand awareness to use. “We fostered very different types of partnerships to expand the market and to cater to the needs of more pro audio segments,” he recalls. “We were the first to partner with Capitol Studios to address the needs of recording engineers. Inevitably, we helped expand the idea that in-ears are for everyone, not just for top touring musicians.”

Of course, bringing a product to “everyone” means being accessible to them; in that regard, Depallens notes, “We are lucky to be based in Southern California, very close to our customers and partners; that helps us stay grounded and connected. We also have the luxury of being part of Logitech, a multinational team with a huge global footprint that provides access to technology, engineering capability and operational competencies around the globe. By combining these two aspects, we are able to organize around obsessing over the customer and their experiences, no matter where they are located.”

The latest result of the company’s fixation is its new UE FITS true wireless instant fit custom earbuds line for consumers, which Depallens cites as an example of the brand’s focus on continuous process improvement. Meanwhile, for pros, the company now offers a line of premium UE CSX custom-made earphones that include an at-home Fit Kit to capture the user’s earprint in a few minutes. Taking custom-fitting processes created for pro IEMs and adapting them to a consumer experience for the UE FITS and CSX lines is part of a larger remit to ultimately help raise the bar—and consumer expectations—for all listeners when it comes to in-ear audio experiences. “Just like how Mercedes invests in Formula One to push the limits of performance, safety and technological advancement for all cars, we see a very clear parallel in what we do for experiencing music,” says Depallens. “The developments pioneered onstage radiate out for all music lovers.”

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com

Why are PSN and Mix Merging?

psn and mix

I’m writing this editorial the night before we go to press with the June 2021 issue of Pro Sound News, and by the time you read it, you may have already heard about what’s happening here at PSN. It’s big: Pro Sound News and Mix are merging.

Starting in July, you’re going to find the news, content and feel of Pro Sound News infused into everything Mix does—its magazine, website, social media, email newsletter, events and more.

It’s a big step—and no simple trick when you’re dealing with two iconic brands, each with its own viewpoint and way of doing things. Still, the word I want to emphasize here is “merging.” As an industry, we all like to interpret or tell ourselves we can “read between the lines” when major news breaks (certainly that’s a big part of what PSN does), but this is a case of WYSIWYG—what you see is what you get. PSN is not shutting down and no one is getting axed. We’re merging.

Beginning with its July issue, Mix magazine will be larger, because we’re going to cram two magazines’ worth of content into it. Pro Sound News has always served up news and insight, particularly in live sound, and pros everywhere trust our Real-World Reviews. Meanwhile, Mix has always been known for its longer, deep-dive features and heavy focus on the recording world. Each brand has always played to its strengths—and now all those strengths are going to be under one banner.

Another example: PSN’s email newsletter comes out three times a week, while Mix’s comes out twice weekly; put them together and you get the new Mix SmartBrief newsletter. Starting July 6, it’ll move to a full weekday schedule (amazingly, 3+2=5). It will also adopt the format of PSN’s newsletter to bring you the latest pro-audio news, reviews and more, along with relevant articles from around the internet, hand-curated by audio pros, not algorithms.

Both brands started as magazines back in the 1970s, with Pro Sound News based in New York City and Mix set up in the Bay Area. You could probably make an argument that each one was a product of its surroundings, with PSN reflecting the scrappy, get-to-the-point attitude of the Big Apple and Mix sporting an immersive West Coast vibe captured in its longer articles and rich photography.

Of course, the industry changed dramatically in the decades that followed, and so did the two magazines. Mix and PSN were always competitive, but for the last nine years, we’ve actually been under the same corporate roof. In 2012, our parent company at the time bought Mix and told both brands to get along in a state of “co-opertition.” As time wore on, our editorial staffs discovered we had a lot in common … starting with a distaste for corporate jargon like “co-opertition.”

Now we get to be colleagues instead of competitors. Mix’s longtime leader, Tom Kenny, is rightfully respected across the industry, and going forward, we’ll be co-editors for all of Mix’s print, digital, social and event platforms. Things will be different, but they’ll also be exciting: We’re taking the best parts of Pro Sound News and Mix and creating a next-generation brand that can lead the industry for the next 40 years.

And that’s just the start. See you next month.

Original Resource is ProSoundNetwork.com